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Title: SU-F-J-157: Effect of Contouring Uncertainty in Post Implant Dosimetry of Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Permanent Seed Brachytherapy

Abstract

Purpose: There is strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate seed brachytherapy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge due to the lack of soft tissue contrast in order to identify the prostate borders. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to uncertainty in the contouring of prostate. Methods: CT images, post-op plans and contours of a cohort of patients (n=43) (low risk=55.8%, intermediate risk=39.5%, high risk=4.7%), who had received prostate seed brachytherapy, were imported into MIM Symphony treatment planning system. The prostate contours in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00 mm, ±2.00 mm, ±3.00 mm, ±4.00 mm and ±5.00 mm. The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: Significant changes were observed in the values of D90 and V100 as well as the number of suboptimal plans for expansion or contraction margins of only few millimeters. Evaluation of coverage based on D90 was found to be less sensitive to expansion errors compared to V100. D90 led to a lower number of implants incorrectly identified with insufficient coverage for expandedmore » contours which increases the accuracy of post-implant QA using CT images compared to V100. Conclusion: In order to establish a successful post implant QA for LDR prostate seed brachytherapy, it is necessary to identify the low and high thresholds of important dose metrics of the target volume such as D90 and V100. Since these parameters are sensitive to target volume definition, accurate identification of prostate borders would help to improve accuracy and predictive value of the post-implant QA process. In this respect, use of imaging modalities such as MRI where prostate is well delineated should prove useful.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada)
  2. (Canada)
  3. Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22634758
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BRACHYTHERAPY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DOSE RATES; DOSIMETRY; IMAGE PROCESSING; NMR IMAGING; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS

Citation Formats

Mashouf, S, Merino, T, Ravi, A, Morton, G, Song, W, University of Toronto, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, ON, Safigholi, H, and Soliman, A. SU-F-J-157: Effect of Contouring Uncertainty in Post Implant Dosimetry of Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Permanent Seed Brachytherapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956065.
Mashouf, S, Merino, T, Ravi, A, Morton, G, Song, W, University of Toronto, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, ON, Safigholi, H, & Soliman, A. SU-F-J-157: Effect of Contouring Uncertainty in Post Implant Dosimetry of Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Permanent Seed Brachytherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956065.
Mashouf, S, Merino, T, Ravi, A, Morton, G, Song, W, University of Toronto, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, ON, Safigholi, H, and Soliman, A. 2016. "SU-F-J-157: Effect of Contouring Uncertainty in Post Implant Dosimetry of Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Permanent Seed Brachytherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956065.
@article{osti_22634758,
title = {SU-F-J-157: Effect of Contouring Uncertainty in Post Implant Dosimetry of Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Permanent Seed Brachytherapy},
author = {Mashouf, S and Merino, T and Ravi, A and Morton, G and Song, W and University of Toronto, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, ON and Safigholi, H and Soliman, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: There is strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate seed brachytherapy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge due to the lack of soft tissue contrast in order to identify the prostate borders. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to uncertainty in the contouring of prostate. Methods: CT images, post-op plans and contours of a cohort of patients (n=43) (low risk=55.8%, intermediate risk=39.5%, high risk=4.7%), who had received prostate seed brachytherapy, were imported into MIM Symphony treatment planning system. The prostate contours in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00 mm, ±2.00 mm, ±3.00 mm, ±4.00 mm and ±5.00 mm. The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: Significant changes were observed in the values of D90 and V100 as well as the number of suboptimal plans for expansion or contraction margins of only few millimeters. Evaluation of coverage based on D90 was found to be less sensitive to expansion errors compared to V100. D90 led to a lower number of implants incorrectly identified with insufficient coverage for expanded contours which increases the accuracy of post-implant QA using CT images compared to V100. Conclusion: In order to establish a successful post implant QA for LDR prostate seed brachytherapy, it is necessary to identify the low and high thresholds of important dose metrics of the target volume such as D90 and V100. Since these parameters are sensitive to target volume definition, accurate identification of prostate borders would help to improve accuracy and predictive value of the post-implant QA process. In this respect, use of imaging modalities such as MRI where prostate is well delineated should prove useful.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956065},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: There is a strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for permanent seed prostate brachytherpy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge as it is difficult to confidently identify the prostate borders from soft tissue surrounding it. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to prostate contouring uncertainty. Methods: The post-implant CT images and plans for a cohort of 43 patients, who have received I–125 permanent prostate seed implant in our centre, were exported to MIM Symphony LDR brachytherapy treatment planning system (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH).more » The prostate contours in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00mm, ±2.00mm, ±3.00mm, ±4.00mm and ±5.00mm (±0.01mm). The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: The mean value of V100 and D90 was obtained as 92.3±8.4% and 108.4±12.3% respectively (Rx=145Gy). V100 was reduced by −3.2±1.5%, −7.2±3.0%, −12.8±4.0%, −19.0±4.8%, − 25.5±5.4% for expanded contours of prostate with margins of +1mm, +2mm, +3mm, +4mm, and +5mm, respectively, while it was increased by 1.6±1.2%, 2.4±2.4%, 2.7±3.2%, 2.9±4.2%, 2.9±5.1% for the contracted contours. D90 was reduced by −6.9±3.5%, −14.5±6.1%, −23.8±7.1%, − 33.6±8.5%, −40.6±8.7% and increased by 4.1±2.6%, 6.1±5.0%, 7.2±5.7%, 8.1±7.3% and 8.1±7.3% for the same set of contours. Conclusion: Systematic expansion errors of more than 1mm may likely render a plan sub-optimal. Conversely contraction errors may Result in labeling a plan likely as optimal. The use of MRI images to contour the prostate should results in better delineation of prostate organ which increases the predictive value of post-op plans. Since observers tend to overestimate the prostate volume on CT, compared with MRI, the impact of the contouring uncertainty on V100 and D90 fortunately, has a conservative effect of underestimating the prostate coverage.« less
  • Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB)more » trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir <=0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or CPBRTB.« less
  • Brachytherapy using permanent seed implants has been an effective treatment for prostate cancer. However, seeds will migrate after implant, thus making the evaluation of post-implant dosimetry difficult. In this study, we developed a computer program to simulate seed migration and analyzed dosimetric changes due to seed migration at various migration amounts. The study was based on 14 patients treated with Pd-103 at the James Cancer Hospital. Modeling of seed migration, including direction, distance as well as day of migration, was based on clinical observations. Changes of commonly used dosimetric parameters as a function of migration amount (2, 4, 6 mmmore » respectively), prostate size (from 20 to 90 cc), and prostate region (central vs peripheral) were studied. Change of biological outcome (tumor control probability) due to migration was also estimated. Migration reduced prostate D90 to 99{+-}2% of original value in 2 mm migration, and the reduction increased to 94{+-}6% in 6 mm migration. The reduction of prostate dose led to a 14% (40%) drop in the tumor control probability for 2 mm (6 mm) migration, assuming radiosensitive tumors. However, migration has less effect on a prostate implanted with a larger number of seeds. Prostate V100 was less sensitive to migration than D90 since its mean value was still 99% of original value even in 6 mm migration. Migration also showed a different effect in the peripheral region vs the central region of the prostate, where the peripheral mean dose tended to drop more significantly. Therefore, extra activity implanted in the peripheral region during pre-plan can be considered. The detrimental effects of migration were more severe in terms of increasing the dose to normal structures, as rectum V50 may be 70% higher and urethra V100 may be 50% higher in the case of 6 mm migration. Quantitative knowledge of these effects is helpful in treatment planning and post-implant evaluation.« less
  • The variation of permanent prostate brachytherapy dosimetry as a function of seed detection rates was investigated for I125 implants with seed activities commonly employed in contemporary practice. Post-implant imaging and radiation dosimetry data from nine patients who underwent PPB served as the basis of this simulation study. One-thousand random configurations of detected seeds were generated for each patient dataset using various seed detection levels from 30% to 99%. Dose parameters, including D90, were computed for each configuration and compared with the actual dosimetry data. A total of 108 000 complete sets of post-PPB dose volume statistics were computed. The resultsmore » demonstrated that although the average D90 differed from the true value by less than 5% when 70% or more seeds were identified, the D90 of an individual case could deviate up to 13%. The 95% confidence interval (CI) of estimated D90 values differ by less than 5% from the actual value when 95% or more seeds are detected, or approximately a 7 Gy difference in the D90 value for a prescription dose of 144 Gy. Estimated target volume dose parameters tended to decrease with reduced seed detection rates. The most variable dose parameter was the prostate V100 in absolute scale while the urethral V100 was most variable in a relative sense. Based on this comprehensive simulation study, it is suggested that 95% or more seeds need to be localized in order to provide an accurate estimation of dose parameters for contemporary iodine 125 permanent prostate brachytherapy.« less
  • Purpose: To compare stranded seeds (SSs) with loose seeds (LSs) in terms of prostate edema, dosimetry, and seed loss after {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of 20 men participated in an institutional review board-approved protocols to study postimplant prostate edema and its effect on dosimetry. The LS cohort underwent brachytherapy between September 2002 and July 2003 and the SS cohort between April 2006 and January 2007. Both cohorts were evaluated sequentially using computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging fusion-based dosimetry on Days 0, 7, and 30. No hormonal therapy or supplemental beam radiotherapy was used. Results: Prostate edemamore » was less in the SS cohort at all points (p = NS). On Day 0, all the prostate dosimetric factors were greater in the LS group than in the SS group (p = 0.003). However, by Days 7 and 30, the dosimetry was similar between the two cohorts. No seeds migrated to the lung in the SS cohort compared with a total of five seeds in 4 patients in the LS cohort. However, the overall seed loss was greater in the SS cohort (24 seeds in 6 patients; 1.1% of total vs. 0.6% for LSs), with most seeds lost through urine (22 seeds in 5 patients). Conclusion: Despite elimination of venous seed migration, greater seed loss was observed with SSs compared with LSs, with the primary site of loss being the urinary tract. Modification of the technique might be necessary to minimize this. Prostate dosimetry on Days 7 and 30 was similar between the SS and LS cohorts.« less