skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-F-J-153: ACR MRI Phantom Test On a 1.5T MR-Simulator with Flexible Coils Setting and Performance Comparison to Volumetric Head Coil Setting

Abstract

Purpose: To accommodate head-and-neck (HN) RT simulation scan with immobilization, sub-optimized flexible radiofrequency coils have to be used on an MR-sim rather than a volumetric head coil for diagnostic radiological (DR) applications. In this study, we present and compare ACR MRI phantom test with flexible coils setting (RT-setting) and volumetric head coil setting (DR-setting). Methods: Two 8-channel array coils were wrapped close to an ACR MRI phantom placed on a flat couch-top in RT-setting for acquisition. ACR MRI phantom tests were conducted 10 times for each setting on a 1.5T MR-sim. Sagittal localizer (TE/TR=20/200ms), axial T1 (TE/TR=20/500ms) and T2 scans (2TEs/TR=20,80/2000ms) were acquired (NEX=1). Acqusition and image analysis were conducted following ACR guidelines. Extra 10 RT-setting acquisitions were obtained by enabling prescan normalization. Results: For RT-setting without prescan normalization, all tests passed the ACR recommended criteria but image intensity uniformity. Geometric accuracy was 147.8±0.3mm and 191.0±0.4mm. Spatial resolution was 0.9mm. Slice thickness was 5.2mm±0.1mm (T1) and 5.1±0.1mm (T2). Slice position accuracy was 1.4±0.6mm, −2.2±0.3mm (T1), and 1.5±0.2mm, −2.2±0.2mm (T2). Image uniformity was 80.6%±2.6% (T1) and 80.2%±3.1% (T2) (criteria: ≥87.5% for 1.5T). Ghosting ratio was 0.0006±0.0004. Low contrast detectability was 30.7±1.7 (T1) and 22.6±3.0 (T2). Image uniformity (91.4%±4.2% and 91.8%±4.3%) andmore » low contrast detectability (36.5±1.4 and 31.6±2.2) of DR-setting were better than RT-setting. Prescan normalization substantially improved image uniformity to 93.4%±0.2% and 93.4%±0.3%, but slightly compromised ghosting (0.0033±0.0004) and spatial resolution (0.9mm or 1.0mm) for RT-setting. Conclusion: Flexible coils setting for HN-RT simulation scan could successfully pass ACR criteria (prescan normalization enabled) and generally achieve comparable performance to volumetric coil setting, although compromise on low contrast detectability was observed probably due to the lower signal-to-noise ratio of the flexible coils. Our results could also serve as a reference baseline of high-field MR-sim QA performance under ACR guideline.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital (Hong Kong)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22634756
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; HEAD; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; NECK; NMR IMAGING; PERFORMANCE; PHANTOMS; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; RECOMMENDATIONS; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; SIMULATION; SIMULATORS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; THICKNESS

Citation Formats

Yuan, J, Wong, O, Cheung, K, and Yu, S. SU-F-J-153: ACR MRI Phantom Test On a 1.5T MR-Simulator with Flexible Coils Setting and Performance Comparison to Volumetric Head Coil Setting. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956061.
Yuan, J, Wong, O, Cheung, K, & Yu, S. SU-F-J-153: ACR MRI Phantom Test On a 1.5T MR-Simulator with Flexible Coils Setting and Performance Comparison to Volumetric Head Coil Setting. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956061.
Yuan, J, Wong, O, Cheung, K, and Yu, S. 2016. "SU-F-J-153: ACR MRI Phantom Test On a 1.5T MR-Simulator with Flexible Coils Setting and Performance Comparison to Volumetric Head Coil Setting". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956061.
@article{osti_22634756,
title = {SU-F-J-153: ACR MRI Phantom Test On a 1.5T MR-Simulator with Flexible Coils Setting and Performance Comparison to Volumetric Head Coil Setting},
author = {Yuan, J and Wong, O and Cheung, K and Yu, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To accommodate head-and-neck (HN) RT simulation scan with immobilization, sub-optimized flexible radiofrequency coils have to be used on an MR-sim rather than a volumetric head coil for diagnostic radiological (DR) applications. In this study, we present and compare ACR MRI phantom test with flexible coils setting (RT-setting) and volumetric head coil setting (DR-setting). Methods: Two 8-channel array coils were wrapped close to an ACR MRI phantom placed on a flat couch-top in RT-setting for acquisition. ACR MRI phantom tests were conducted 10 times for each setting on a 1.5T MR-sim. Sagittal localizer (TE/TR=20/200ms), axial T1 (TE/TR=20/500ms) and T2 scans (2TEs/TR=20,80/2000ms) were acquired (NEX=1). Acqusition and image analysis were conducted following ACR guidelines. Extra 10 RT-setting acquisitions were obtained by enabling prescan normalization. Results: For RT-setting without prescan normalization, all tests passed the ACR recommended criteria but image intensity uniformity. Geometric accuracy was 147.8±0.3mm and 191.0±0.4mm. Spatial resolution was 0.9mm. Slice thickness was 5.2mm±0.1mm (T1) and 5.1±0.1mm (T2). Slice position accuracy was 1.4±0.6mm, −2.2±0.3mm (T1), and 1.5±0.2mm, −2.2±0.2mm (T2). Image uniformity was 80.6%±2.6% (T1) and 80.2%±3.1% (T2) (criteria: ≥87.5% for 1.5T). Ghosting ratio was 0.0006±0.0004. Low contrast detectability was 30.7±1.7 (T1) and 22.6±3.0 (T2). Image uniformity (91.4%±4.2% and 91.8%±4.3%) and low contrast detectability (36.5±1.4 and 31.6±2.2) of DR-setting were better than RT-setting. Prescan normalization substantially improved image uniformity to 93.4%±0.2% and 93.4%±0.3%, but slightly compromised ghosting (0.0033±0.0004) and spatial resolution (0.9mm or 1.0mm) for RT-setting. Conclusion: Flexible coils setting for HN-RT simulation scan could successfully pass ACR criteria (prescan normalization enabled) and generally achieve comparable performance to volumetric coil setting, although compromise on low contrast detectability was observed probably due to the lower signal-to-noise ratio of the flexible coils. Our results could also serve as a reference baseline of high-field MR-sim QA performance under ACR guideline.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956061},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • A model pulse coil with a stored energy of 0.45 MJ at 6 T has been built and tested in order to meet the requirements of superconducting poloidal coils of a medium size tokamak of the Reacting Plasma Project. The inner and outer diameters of the coil (RPC-I) are 19.0 and 46.8 cm, respectively, with an axial length of 41.4 cm. The pulsing test was performed by a condenser discharge method with a clamp circuit. By applying a terminal voltage of 7.0 kV, the coil was charged up to 3.84 T in 26 msec and discharged to zero with amore » time constant of 100 msec. The average and maximum of pulsing rates in charge-up period were 147 T/sec and 231 T/sec, respectively. The associated a.c. loss per pulse was approximately 1 kJ which was only 0.57 % of the energy stored in the coil. These results have shown for the first time the scientific feasibility of superconducting pulse coils with a pulsing rate of about 200 T/sec. As the next step, the authors are constructing a new coil (RPC-II) with a winding composed of wider helium cooling channels and insulation sheets between layers.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the 3D geometric distortion of four potential MR sequences for radiotheraptic applications, and its dependency on sequence-type, acquisition-orientation and receiver-bandwidth from a dedicated 1.5T 700mm-wide bore MR-simulator (Magnetom-Aera, Sienmens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany), using a large customized geometric accuracy phantom. Methods: This work studied 3D gradient-echo (VIBE) and spin-echo (SPACE) sequences for anatomical imaging; a specific ultra-short-TE sequence (PETRA) potentially for bone imaging and MR-based dosimetry; and a motion-insensitive sequence (BLADE) for dynamic applications like 4D-MRI. Integrated geometric-correction was employed, three orthogonal acquisition-orientations and up to three receiver-bandwidths were used, yielding 27 acquisitions for testing (Table 1a).A customizedmore » geometric accuracy phantom (polyurethane, MR/CT invisible, W×L×H:55×55×32.5cm3) was constructed and filled with 3892 spherical markers (6mm diameter, MR/CT visible) arranged on a 25mm-interval 3D isotropic-grid (Fig.1). The marker positions in MR images were quantitatively calculated and compared against those in the CT-reference using customized MatLab scripts. Results: The average distortion within various diameter-of-spherical-volumes (DSVs) and the usable DSVs under various distortion limits were measured (Tables 1b-c). It was observed that distortions fluctuated when sequence-type, acquisition-orientation or receiver-bandwidth changed (e.g. within 300mm-DSV, the lowest/highest average distortions of VIBE were 0.40mm/0.59mm, a 47.5% difference). According to AAPM-TG66 (<1mm distortion, left-most column of Table 1c), PETRA (Largest-DSV:253.9mm) has the potential on brain treatment, while BLADE (Largest-DSV:207.2mm) may need improvement for thoracic/abdominal applications. The results of VIBE (Largest-DSVs:294.3mm, the best among tested acquisitions) and SPACE (Largest-DSVs:267.7mm) suggests their potentials on head and neck applications. These Largest-DSVs were attained on different acquisition-orientations and receiver-bandwidths. Conclusion: Geometric distortion was shown to be dependent on sequence-type, acquisition-orientation and receiver-bandwidth. In the experiment, no configuration in any one of these factors could consistently reduce distortion while the others were varying. The distortion analysis result is a valuable guideline for sequence selection and optimization for MR-aided radiotherapy applications.« less
  • We present design and test results of a superconducting persistent current switch (PCS) for pancake coils of rare-earth-barium-copper-oxide, REBCO, high-temperature superconductor (HTS). Here, a REBCO double-pancake (DP) coil, 152-mm ID, 168-mm OD, 12-mm high, was wound with a no-insulation technique. We converted a ∼10-cm long section in the outermost layer of each pancake to a PCS. The DP coil was operated in liquid nitrogen (77–65 K) and in solid nitrogen (60–57 K). Over the operating temperature ranges of this experiment, the normal-state PCS enabled the DP coil to be energized; thereupon, the PCS resumed the superconducting state and the DP coil fieldmore » decayed with a time constant of 100 h, which would have been nearly infinite, i.e., persistent-mode operation, were the joint across the coil terminals superconducting.« less
  • Purpose: Optical surface imaging has been applied to radiation therapy patient setup. This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the surface registration of the optical surface imaging compared with that of the conventional method of volumetric registration for patient setup in head and neck radiation therapy. Methods: Clinical datasets of planning CT and treatment Cone Beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare the surface and volumetric registrations in radiation therapy patient setup. The Iterative Closest Points based on point-plane closest method was implemented for surface registration. We employed 3D Slicer for rigid volumetric registration of planning CT and treatmentmore » CBCT. 6 parameters of registration results (3 rotations and 3 translations) were obtained by the two registration methods, and the results were compared. Digital simulation tests in ideal cases were also performed to validate each registration method. Results: Digital simulation tests showed that both of the registration methods were accurate and robust enough to compare the registration results. In experiments with the actual clinical data, the results showed considerable deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations. The average root mean squared translational error was 2.7 mm and the maximum translational error was 5.2 mm. Conclusion: The deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations was considerable. Special caution should be taken in using an optical surface imaging. To ensure the accuracy of optical surface imaging in radiation therapy patient setup, additional measures are required. This research was supported in part by the KIST institutional program (2E24551), the Industrial Strategic technology development program (10035495) funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE, KOREA), and the Radiation Safety Research Programs (1305033) through the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission, and the NIH (R01EB016777)« less
  • Purpose: Proton radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) aims to improve organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing over photon radiotherapy. However, it may be less robust for setup and range uncertainties. The authors investigated OAR sparing and plan robustness for spot-scanning proton planning techniques and compared these with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) photon plans. Methods: Ten HNC patients were replanned using two arc VMAT (RapidArc) and spot-scanning proton techniques. OARs to be spared included the contra- and ipsilateral parotid and submandibular glands and individual swallowing muscles. Proton plans were made using Multifield Optimization (MFO, using three, five, and seven fields) and Single-field Optimizationmore » (SFO, using three fields). OAR sparing was evaluated using mean dose to composite salivary glands (Comp{sub Sal}) and composite swallowing muscles (Comp{sub Swal}). Plan robustness was determined for setup and range uncertainties (±3 mm for setup, ±3% HU) evaluating V95% and V107% for clinical target volumes. Results: Averaged over all patients Comp{sub Sal}/Comp{sub Swal} mean doses were lower for the three-field MFO plans (14.6/16.4 Gy) compared to the three-field SFO plans (20.0/23.7 Gy) and VMAT plans (23.0/25.3 Gy). Using more than three fields resulted in differences in OAR sparing of less than 1.5 Gy between plans. SFO plans were significantly more robust than MFO plans. VMAT plans were the most robust. Conclusions: MFO plans had improved OAR sparing but were less robust than SFO and VMAT plans, while SFO plans were more robust than MFO plans but resulted in less OAR sparing. Robustness of the MFO plans did not increase with more fields.« less