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Title: SU-F-J-151: Evaluation of a Magnetic Resonance Image Gated Radiotherapy System Using a Motion Phantom and Radiochromic Film

Abstract

Purpose: Magnetic resonance image (MRI) guided radiotherapy enables gating directly on target position for soft-tissue targets in the lung and abdomen. We present a dosimetric evaluation of a commercially-available FDA-approved MRI-guided radiotherapy system’s gating performance using a MRI-compatible respiratory motion phantom and radiochromic film. Methods: The MRI-compatible phantom was capable of one-dimensional motion. The phantom consisted of a target rod containing high-contrast target inserts which moved inside a body structure containing background contrast material. The target rod was equipped with a radiochromic film insert. Treatment plans were generated for a 3 cm diameter spherical target, and delivered to the phantom at rest and in motion with and without gating. Both sinusoidal and actual tumor trajectories (two free-breathing trajectories and one repeated-breath hold) were used. Gamma comparison at 5%/3mm was used to measure fidelity to the static target dose distribution. Results: Without gating, gamma pass rates were 24–47% depending on motion trajectory. Using our clinical standard of repeated breath holds and a gating window of 3 mm with 10% of the target allowed outside the gating boundary, the gamma pass rate was 99.6%. Relaxing the gating window to 5 mm resulted in gamma pass rate of 98.6% with repeated breath holds.more » For all motion trajectories gated with 3 mm margin and 10% allowed out, gamma pass rates were between 64–100% (mean:87.5%). For a 5 mm margin and 10% allowed out, gamma pass rates were between 57–98% (mean: 82.49%), significantly lower than for 3 mm by paired t-test (p=0.01). Conclusion: We validated the performance of respiratory gating based on real-time cine MRI images with the only FDA-approved MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Our results suggest that repeated breath hold gating should be used when possible for best accuracy. A 3 mm gating margin is statistically significantly more accurate than a 5 mm gating margin.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22634754
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ABDOMEN; ACCURACY; ANIMAL TISSUES; FILMS; IMAGES; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; RESPIRATION; TRAJECTORIES

Citation Formats

Lamb, J, Ginn, J, O’Connell, D, Thomas, D, Agazaryan, N, Cao, M, Yang, Y, and Low, D. SU-F-J-151: Evaluation of a Magnetic Resonance Image Gated Radiotherapy System Using a Motion Phantom and Radiochromic Film. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956059.
Lamb, J, Ginn, J, O’Connell, D, Thomas, D, Agazaryan, N, Cao, M, Yang, Y, & Low, D. SU-F-J-151: Evaluation of a Magnetic Resonance Image Gated Radiotherapy System Using a Motion Phantom and Radiochromic Film. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956059.
Lamb, J, Ginn, J, O’Connell, D, Thomas, D, Agazaryan, N, Cao, M, Yang, Y, and Low, D. 2016. "SU-F-J-151: Evaluation of a Magnetic Resonance Image Gated Radiotherapy System Using a Motion Phantom and Radiochromic Film". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956059.
@article{osti_22634754,
title = {SU-F-J-151: Evaluation of a Magnetic Resonance Image Gated Radiotherapy System Using a Motion Phantom and Radiochromic Film},
author = {Lamb, J and Ginn, J and O’Connell, D and Thomas, D and Agazaryan, N and Cao, M and Yang, Y and Low, D},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Magnetic resonance image (MRI) guided radiotherapy enables gating directly on target position for soft-tissue targets in the lung and abdomen. We present a dosimetric evaluation of a commercially-available FDA-approved MRI-guided radiotherapy system’s gating performance using a MRI-compatible respiratory motion phantom and radiochromic film. Methods: The MRI-compatible phantom was capable of one-dimensional motion. The phantom consisted of a target rod containing high-contrast target inserts which moved inside a body structure containing background contrast material. The target rod was equipped with a radiochromic film insert. Treatment plans were generated for a 3 cm diameter spherical target, and delivered to the phantom at rest and in motion with and without gating. Both sinusoidal and actual tumor trajectories (two free-breathing trajectories and one repeated-breath hold) were used. Gamma comparison at 5%/3mm was used to measure fidelity to the static target dose distribution. Results: Without gating, gamma pass rates were 24–47% depending on motion trajectory. Using our clinical standard of repeated breath holds and a gating window of 3 mm with 10% of the target allowed outside the gating boundary, the gamma pass rate was 99.6%. Relaxing the gating window to 5 mm resulted in gamma pass rate of 98.6% with repeated breath holds. For all motion trajectories gated with 3 mm margin and 10% allowed out, gamma pass rates were between 64–100% (mean:87.5%). For a 5 mm margin and 10% allowed out, gamma pass rates were between 57–98% (mean: 82.49%), significantly lower than for 3 mm by paired t-test (p=0.01). Conclusion: We validated the performance of respiratory gating based on real-time cine MRI images with the only FDA-approved MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Our results suggest that repeated breath hold gating should be used when possible for best accuracy. A 3 mm gating margin is statistically significantly more accurate than a 5 mm gating margin.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956059},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: In this study, the authors have quantified the two-dimensional (2D) perspective of skin dose increase using EBT film dosimetry in phantom in the presence of patient immobilization devices during conventional and IMRT treatments. Methods: For 6 MV conventional photon field, the authors evaluated and quantified the 2D bolus effect on skin doses for six different common patient immobilization/support devices, including carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, Orfit carbon fiber base plate, balsa wood board, Styrofoam, perforated AquaPlast sheet, and alpha-cradle. For 6 and 15 MV IMRT fields, a stack of two film layers positioned above a solid phantom wasmore » exposed at the air interface or in the presence of a patient alpha-cradle. All the films were scanned and the pixel values were converted to doses based on an established calibration curve. The authors determined the 2D skin dose distributions, isodose curves, and cross-sectional profiles at the surface layers with or without the immobilization/support device. The authors also generated and compared the dose area histograms (DAHs) and dose area products from the 2D skin dose distributions. Results: In contrast with 20% relative dose [(RD) dose relative to d{sub max} on central axis] at 0.0153 cm in the film layer for 6 MV 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, the average RDs at the same depth in the film layer were 71%, 69%, 55%, and 57% for Orfit, balsa wood, Styrofoam, and alpha-cradle, respectively. At the same depth, the RDs were 54% under a strut and 26% between neighboring struts of a carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, and between 34% and 56% for stretched perforated AquaPlast sheet. In the presence of the alpha-cradle for the 6 MV (15 MV) IMRT fields, the hot spot doses at the effective measurement depths of 0.0153 and 0.0459 cm were 140% and 150% (83% and 89%), respectively, of the isocenter dose. The enhancement factor was defined as the ratio of a given DAH parameter (minimum dose received in a given area) with and without the support device. For 6 MV conventional 10x10 cm{sup 2} field, the enhancement factor was the highest (3.4) for the Orfit carbon fiber plate. As for the IMRT field, the enhancement factors varied with the size of the area of interest and were as high as 3.8 (4.3) at the hot spot of 5 cm{sup 2} area in the top film layer (0.0153 cm) for 6 MV (15 MV) beams. Conclusions: Significant 2D bolus effect on skin dose in the presence of patient support and immobilization devices was confirmed and quantified with EBT film dosimetry. Furthermore, the EBT film has potential application for in vivo monitoring of the 2D skin dose distributions during patient treatments.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured inmore » the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging.« less
  • Purpose: 4D-CT is often limited by motion artifacts, low temporal resolution, and poor phase-based target definition. We recently developed a novel k-space self-gated 4D-MRI technique with high spatial and temporal resolution. The goal here is to geometrically validate 4D-MRI using a MRI-CT compatible respiratory motion phantom and comparison to 4D-CT. Methods: 4D-MRI was acquired using 3T spoiled gradient echo-based 3D projection sequences. Respiratory phases were resolved using self-gated k-space lines as the motion surrogate. Images were reconstructed into 10 temporal bins with 1.56×1.56×1.56mm3. A MRI-CT compatible phantom was designed with a 23mm diameter ball target filled with highconcentration gadolinium(Gd) gelmore » embedded in a 35×40×63mm3 plastic box stabilized with low-concentration Gd gel. The whole phantom was driven by an air pump. Human respiratory motion was mimicked using the controller from a commercial dynamic phantom (RSD). Four breathing settings (rates/depths: 10s/20mm, 6s/15mm, 4s/10mm, 3s/7mm) were scanned with 4D-MRI and 4D-CT (slice thickness 1.25mm). Motion ground-truth was obtained from input signals and real-time video recordings. Reconstructed images were imported into Eclipse(Varian) for target contouring. Volumes and target positions were compared with ground-truth. Initial human study was investigated on a liver patient. Results: 4D-MRI and 4D-CT scans for the different breathing cycles were reconstructed with 10 phases. Target volume in each phase was measured for both 4D-CT and 4D-MRI. Volume percentage difference for the 6.37ml target ranged from 6.67±5.33 to 11.63±5.57 for 4D-CT and from 1.47±0.52 to 2.12±1.60 for 4D-MRI. The Mann-Whitney U-test shows the 4D-MRI is significantly superior to 4D-CT (p=0.021) for phase-based target definition. Centroid motion error ranges were 1.35–1.25mm (4D-CT), and 0.31–0.12mm (4D-MRI). Conclusion: The k-space self-gated 4D-MRI we recently developed can accurately determine phase-based target volume while avoiding typical motion artifacts found in 4D-CT, and is being further studied for use in GI targeting and motion management. This work supported in part by grant 1R03CA173273-01.« less
  • Purpose: To validate an automated image processing algorithm designed to detect the center of radiochromic film used for in vivo film dosimetry against the current gold standard of manual selection. Methods: An image processing algorithm was developed to automatically select the region of interest (ROI) in *.tiff images that contain multiple pieces of radiochromic film (0.5x1.3cm{sup 2}). After a user has linked a calibration file to the processing algorithm and selected a *.tiff file for processing, an ROI is automatically detected for all films by a combination of thresholding and erosion, which removes edges and any additional markings for orientation.more » Calibration is applied to the mean pixel values from the ROIs and a *.tiff image is output displaying the original image with an overlay of the ROIs and the measured doses. Validation of the algorithm was determined by comparing in vivo dose determined using the current gold standard (manually drawn ROIs) versus automated ROIs for n=420 scanned films. Bland-Altman analysis, paired t-test, and linear regression were performed to demonstrate agreement between the processes. Results: The measured doses ranged from 0.2-886.6cGy. Bland-Altman analysis of the two techniques (automatic minus manual) revealed a bias of -0.28cGy and a 95% confidence interval of (5.5cGy,-6.1cGy). These values demonstrate excellent agreement between the two techniques. Paired t-test results showed no statistical differences between the two techniques, p=0.98. Linear regression with a forced zero intercept demonstrated that Automatic=0.997*Manual, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.999. The minimal differences between the two techniques may be explained by the fact that the hand drawn ROIs were not identical to the automatically selected ones. The average processing time was 6.7seconds in Matlab on an IntelCore2Duo processor. Conclusion: An automated image processing algorithm has been developed and validated, which will help minimize user interaction and processing time of radiochromic film used for in vivo dosimetry.« less
  • Purpose: To demonstrate the viability of radiochromic film as an in vivo, two-dimensional dosimeter for the measurement of underdosed areas in patients undergoing total skin electron beam (TSEB) radiotherapy. The results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements. Methods and Materials: Dosimetry results are reported for an inframammary fold of 2 patients treated using a modified version of the Stanford six-position (i.e., six-field and dual-beam) TSEB technique. The results are presented as contour plots of film optical density and percentage of dose. A linear dose profile measured from film was compared with the thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements. Results: The results showed thatmore » the percentage doses as measured by film are in good agreement with those measured by the thermoluminescent dosimeters. The isodose contour plots provided by film can be used as a two-dimensional dose map for a patient when determining the size of the supplemental patch fields. Conclusion: Radiochromic film is a viable dosimetry tool that the radiation oncologist can use to understand the surface dose heterogeneity better across complex concave regions of skin to help establish more appropriate margins to patch underdosed areas. Film could be used for patients undergoing TSEB for disorders such as mycosis fungoides or undergoing TSEB or regional skin electron beam for widespread skin metastases from breast cancer and other malignancies.« less