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Title: SU-F-J-111: A Novel Distance-Dose Weighting Method for Label Fusion in Multi- Atlas Segmentation for Prostate Radiation Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: A novel distance-dose weighting method for label fusion was developed to increase segmentation accuracy in dosimetrically important regions for prostate radiation therapy. Methods: Label fusion as implemented in the original SIMPLE (OS) for multi-atlas segmentation relies iteratively on the majority vote to generate an estimated ground truth and DICE similarity measure to screen candidates. The proposed distance-dose weighting puts more values on dosimetrically important regions when calculating similarity measure. Specifically, we introduced distance-to-dose error (DDE), which converts distance to dosimetric importance, in performance evaluation. The DDE calculates an estimated DE error derived from surface distance differences between the candidate and estimated ground truth label by multiplying a regression coefficient. To determine the coefficient at each simulation point on the rectum, we fitted DE error with respect to simulated voxel shift. The DEs were calculated by the multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry training model previously developed in our research group. Results: For both the OS and the distance-dose weighted SIMPLE (WS) results, the evaluation metrics for twenty patients were calculated using the ground truth segmentation. The mean difference of DICE, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance (MAD) between OS and WS have shown 0, 0.10, and 0.11, respectively. In partial MAD of WSmore » which calculates MAD within a certain PTV expansion voxel distance, the lower MADs were observed at the closer distances from 1 to 8 than those of OS. The DE results showed that the segmentation from WS produced more accurate results than OS. The mean DE error of V75, V70, V65, and V60 were decreased by 1.16%, 1.17%, 1.14%, and 1.12%, respectively. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the method can increase the segmentation accuracy in rectum regions adjacent to PTV. As a result, segmentation using WS have shown improved dosimetric accuracy than OS. The WS will provide dosimetrically important label selection strategy in multi-atlas segmentation. CPRIT grant RP150485.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)
  2. Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22634718
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; DISTANCE; DOSIMETRY; ERRORS; GROUND TRUTH MEASUREMENTS; ITERATIVE METHODS; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; RECTUM; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Chang, J, Gu, X, Lu, W, Jiang, S, and Song, T. SU-F-J-111: A Novel Distance-Dose Weighting Method for Label Fusion in Multi- Atlas Segmentation for Prostate Radiation Therapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956019.
Chang, J, Gu, X, Lu, W, Jiang, S, & Song, T. SU-F-J-111: A Novel Distance-Dose Weighting Method for Label Fusion in Multi- Atlas Segmentation for Prostate Radiation Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956019.
Chang, J, Gu, X, Lu, W, Jiang, S, and Song, T. 2016. "SU-F-J-111: A Novel Distance-Dose Weighting Method for Label Fusion in Multi- Atlas Segmentation for Prostate Radiation Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956019.
@article{osti_22634718,
title = {SU-F-J-111: A Novel Distance-Dose Weighting Method for Label Fusion in Multi- Atlas Segmentation for Prostate Radiation Therapy},
author = {Chang, J and Gu, X and Lu, W and Jiang, S and Song, T},
abstractNote = {Purpose: A novel distance-dose weighting method for label fusion was developed to increase segmentation accuracy in dosimetrically important regions for prostate radiation therapy. Methods: Label fusion as implemented in the original SIMPLE (OS) for multi-atlas segmentation relies iteratively on the majority vote to generate an estimated ground truth and DICE similarity measure to screen candidates. The proposed distance-dose weighting puts more values on dosimetrically important regions when calculating similarity measure. Specifically, we introduced distance-to-dose error (DDE), which converts distance to dosimetric importance, in performance evaluation. The DDE calculates an estimated DE error derived from surface distance differences between the candidate and estimated ground truth label by multiplying a regression coefficient. To determine the coefficient at each simulation point on the rectum, we fitted DE error with respect to simulated voxel shift. The DEs were calculated by the multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry training model previously developed in our research group. Results: For both the OS and the distance-dose weighted SIMPLE (WS) results, the evaluation metrics for twenty patients were calculated using the ground truth segmentation. The mean difference of DICE, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance (MAD) between OS and WS have shown 0, 0.10, and 0.11, respectively. In partial MAD of WS which calculates MAD within a certain PTV expansion voxel distance, the lower MADs were observed at the closer distances from 1 to 8 than those of OS. The DE results showed that the segmentation from WS produced more accurate results than OS. The mean DE error of V75, V70, V65, and V60 were decreased by 1.16%, 1.17%, 1.14%, and 1.12%, respectively. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the method can increase the segmentation accuracy in rectum regions adjacent to PTV. As a result, segmentation using WS have shown improved dosimetric accuracy than OS. The WS will provide dosimetrically important label selection strategy in multi-atlas segmentation. CPRIT grant RP150485.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956019},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Background: There are no well-established normal tissue sparing dose–volume histogram (DVH) criteria that limit the risk of urinary toxicity from prostate radiation therapy (RT). The aim of this study was to determine which criteria predict late toxicity among various DVH parameters when contouring the entire solid bladder and its contents versus the bladder wall. The area under the histogram curve (AUHC) was also analyzed. Methods and Materials: From 1993 to 2000, 503 men with prostate cancer received 3-dimensional conformal RT (median follow-up time, 71 months). The whole bladder and the bladder wall were contoured in all patients. The primary endpointmore » was grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity occurring ≥3 months after completion of RT. Cox regressions of time to grade ≥2 toxicity were estimated separately for the entire bladder and bladder wall. Concordance probability estimates (CPE) assessed model discriminative ability. Before training the models, an external random test group of 100 men was set aside for testing. Separate analyses were performed based on the mean age (≤ 68 vs >68 years). Results: Age, pretreatment urinary symptoms, mean dose (entire bladder and bladder wall), and AUHC (entire bladder and bladder wall) were significant (P<.05) in multivariable analysis. Overall, bladder wall CPE values were higher than solid bladder values. The AUHC for bladder wall provided the greatest discrimination for late bladder toxicity when compared with alternative DVH points, with CPE values of 0.68 for age ≤68 years and 0.81 for age >68 years. Conclusion: The AUHC method based on bladder wall volumes was superior for predicting late GU toxicity. Age >68 years was associated with late grade ≥2 GU toxicity, which suggests that risk-adapted dose constraints based on age should be explored.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of daily dose monitoring using a patient specific atlas-based autosegmentation method on diagnostic quality verification images.Methods: Seven patients, who were treated for prostate cancer with intensity modulated radiotherapy under daily imaging guidance of a CT-on-rails system, were selected for this study. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on the first six and last seven sets of daily verification images. For each patient, three patient specific atlases were constructed using manual contours from planning CT alone (1-image atlas), planning CT plus first three verification CTs (4-image atlas), and planning CT plus first six verificationmore » CTs (7-image atlas). These atlases were subsequently applied to the last seven verification image sets of the same patient to generate the auto-contours. Daily dose was calculated by applying the original treatment plans to the daily beam isocenters. The autocontours and manual contours were compared geometrically using the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and dosimetrically using the dose to 99% of the prostate CTV (D99) and the D5 of rectum and bladder.Results: The DSC of the autocontours obtained with the 4-image atlases were 87.0%± 3.3%, 84.7%± 8.6%, and 93.6%± 4.3% for the prostate, rectum, and bladder, respectively. These indices were higher than those from the 1-image atlases (p < 0.01) and comparable to those from the 7-image atlases (p > 0.05). Daily prostate D99 of the autocontours was comparable to those of the manual contours (p= 0.55). For the bladder and rectum, the daily D5 were 95.5%± 5.9% and 99.1%± 2.6% of the planned D5 for the autocontours compared to 95.3%± 6.7% (p= 0.58) and 99.8%± 2.3% (p < 0.01) for the manual contours.Conclusions: With patient specific 4-image atlases, atlas-based autosegmentation can adequately facilitate daily dose monitoring for prostate cancer.« less
  • Purpose: To report late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical and clinical outcomes, and overall survival after hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Three institutions included 113 patients with T1 to T3N0M0 PC in a phase II study. Patients were treated with 56 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks. Late toxicity was scored using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria extended with additional symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Results: The incidence of late GI and GU toxicity was low. Themore » 3-year actuarial risk of developing late GU and GI toxicity of grade {>=}2 was 13% and 8% respectively. Five-year biochemical non-evidence of disease (bNED) was 94%. Risk group, T stage, and deviation from planned hormone treatment were significant predictive factors for bNED. Deviation from hormone treatment remained significant in multivariate analysis. Five-year clinical non evidence of disease and overall survival was 95% and 91% respectively. No patient died from PC. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose radiation therapy is a valuable treatment option for patients with PC, with excellent biochemical and clinical outcome and low toxicity.« less
  • Purpose: To characterize the effect of a prostate-rectum spacer on dose to rectum during external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer and to assess for factors correlated with rectal dose reduction. Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients at 4 institutions were enrolled into a prospective pilot clinical trial. Patients underwent baseline scans and then were injected with perirectal spacing hydrogel and rescanned. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created on both scans for comparison. The objectives were to establish rates of creation of ≥7.5 mm of prostate-rectal separation, and decrease in rectal V70 of ≥25%. Multiple regression analysis was performed tomore » evaluate the associations between preinjection and postinjection changes in rectal V70 and changes in plan conformity, rectal volume, bladder volume, bladder V70, planning target volume (PTV), and postinjection midgland separation, gel volume, gel thickness, length of PTV/gel contact, and gel left-to-right symmetry. Results: Hydrogel resulted in ≥7.5-mm prostate-rectal separation in 95.8% of patients; 95.7% had decreased rectal V70 of ≥25%, with a mean reduction of 8.0 Gy. There were no significant differences in preinjection and postinjection prostate, PTV, rectal, and bladder volumes. Plan conformities were significantly different before versus after injection (P=.02); plans with worse conformity indexes after injection compared with before injection (n=13) still had improvements in rectal V70. In multiple regression analysis, greater postinjection reduction in V70 was associated with decreased relative postinjection plan conformity (P=.01). Reductions in V70 did not significantly vary by institution, despite significant interinstitutional variations in plan conformity. There were no significant relationships between reduction in V70 and the other characteristics analyzed. Conclusions: Injection of hydrogel into the prostate-rectal interface resulted in dose reductions to rectum for >90% of patients treated. Rectal sparing was statistically significant across a range of 10 to 75 Gy and was demonstrated within the presence of significant interinstitutional variability in plan conformity, target definitions, and injection results.« less
  • Purpose: To determine whether a dose-response relationship exists for salvage radiation therapy (RT) of biochemical failure after prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Individual data from 1108 patients who underwent salvage RT at 10 academic centers were pooled. The cohort was enriched for selection criteria more likely associated with tumor recurrence in the prostate bed (margin positive and pre-RT prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level of ≤2.0 ng/mL) and without the confounding of planned androgen suppression. The cumulative incidence of biochemical failure and distant metastasis over time was computed, and competing risks hazard regression models were used to investigate the association betweenmore » potential predictors and these outcomes. The association of radiation dose with outcomes was the primary focus. Results: With a 65.2-month follow-up duration, the 5- and 10-year estimates of freedom from post-RT biochemical failure (PSA level >0.2 ng/mL and rising) was 63.5% and 49.8%, respectively, and the cumulative incidence of distant metastasis was 12.4% by 10 years. A Gleason score of ≥7, higher pre-RT PSA level, extraprostatic tumor extension, and seminal vesicle invasion were associated with worse biochemical failure and distant metastasis outcomes. A salvage radiation dose of ≥66.0 Gy was associated with a reduced cumulative incidence of biochemical failure, but not of distant metastasis. Conclusions: The use of salvage radiation doses of ≥66.0 Gy are supported by evidence presented in the present multicenter pooled analysis of individual patient data. The observational reporting method, limited sample size, few distant metastasis events, modest follow-up duration, and elective use of salvage therapy might have diminished the opportunity to identify an association between the radiation dose and this endpoint.« less