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Title: SU-F-J-80: Deformable Image Registration for Residual Organ Motion Estimation in Respiratory Gated Treatments with Scanned Carbon Ion Beams

Abstract

Purpose: At the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO, Pavia, Italy) C-ions respiratory gated treatments of patients with abdominal tumours started in 2014. In these cases, the therapeutic dose is delivered around end-exhale. We propose the use of a respiratory motion model to evaluate residual tumour motion. Such a model requires motion fields obtained from deformable image registration (DIR) between 4DCT phases, estimating anatomical motion through interpolation. The aim of this work is to identify the optimal DIR technique to be integrated in the modeling pipeline. Methods: We used 4DCT datasets from 4 patients to test 4 DIR algorithms: Bspline, demons, log-domain and symmetric log domain diffeomorphic demons. We evaluate DIR performance in terms of registration accuracy (RMSE between registered images) and anatomical consistency of the motion field (Jacobian) when registering end-inhale to end-exhale. We subsequently employed the model to estimate the tumour trajectory within the ideal gating window. Results: Within the liver contour, the RMSE is in the range 31–46 HU for the best performing algorithm (Bspline) and 43–145 HU for the worst one (demons). The Jacobians featured zero negative voxels (which indicate singularities in the motion field) for the Bspline fields in 3 of 4 patients, whereas diffeomorphicmore » demons fields showed a non-null number of negative voxels in every case. GTV motion in the gating window measured less than 7 mm for every patient, displaying a predominant superior-inferior (SI) component. Conclusion: The Bspline algorithm allows for acceptable DIR results in the abdominal region, exhibiting the property of anatomical consistency of the computed field. Computed trajectories are in agreement with clinical expectations (small and prevalent SI displacements), since patients lie wearing semi-rigid immobilizing masks. In future, the model could be used for retrospective estimation of organ motion during treatment, as guided by the breathing surrogate signal.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [1];  [3]
  1. Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)
  2. Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy)
  3. (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22632207
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; ALGORITHMS; CARBON; CARBON IONS; DATASETS; IMAGES; ION BEAMS; LIVER; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PERFORMANCE; RADIATION DOSES; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Meschini, G, Seregni, M, Pella, A, Baroni, G, Riboldi, M, and Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia. SU-F-J-80: Deformable Image Registration for Residual Organ Motion Estimation in Respiratory Gated Treatments with Scanned Carbon Ion Beams. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955988.
Meschini, G, Seregni, M, Pella, A, Baroni, G, Riboldi, M, & Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia. SU-F-J-80: Deformable Image Registration for Residual Organ Motion Estimation in Respiratory Gated Treatments with Scanned Carbon Ion Beams. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955988.
Meschini, G, Seregni, M, Pella, A, Baroni, G, Riboldi, M, and Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia. Wed . "SU-F-J-80: Deformable Image Registration for Residual Organ Motion Estimation in Respiratory Gated Treatments with Scanned Carbon Ion Beams". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955988.
@article{osti_22632207,
title = {SU-F-J-80: Deformable Image Registration for Residual Organ Motion Estimation in Respiratory Gated Treatments with Scanned Carbon Ion Beams},
author = {Meschini, G and Seregni, M and Pella, A and Baroni, G and Riboldi, M and Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia},
abstractNote = {Purpose: At the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO, Pavia, Italy) C-ions respiratory gated treatments of patients with abdominal tumours started in 2014. In these cases, the therapeutic dose is delivered around end-exhale. We propose the use of a respiratory motion model to evaluate residual tumour motion. Such a model requires motion fields obtained from deformable image registration (DIR) between 4DCT phases, estimating anatomical motion through interpolation. The aim of this work is to identify the optimal DIR technique to be integrated in the modeling pipeline. Methods: We used 4DCT datasets from 4 patients to test 4 DIR algorithms: Bspline, demons, log-domain and symmetric log domain diffeomorphic demons. We evaluate DIR performance in terms of registration accuracy (RMSE between registered images) and anatomical consistency of the motion field (Jacobian) when registering end-inhale to end-exhale. We subsequently employed the model to estimate the tumour trajectory within the ideal gating window. Results: Within the liver contour, the RMSE is in the range 31–46 HU for the best performing algorithm (Bspline) and 43–145 HU for the worst one (demons). The Jacobians featured zero negative voxels (which indicate singularities in the motion field) for the Bspline fields in 3 of 4 patients, whereas diffeomorphic demons fields showed a non-null number of negative voxels in every case. GTV motion in the gating window measured less than 7 mm for every patient, displaying a predominant superior-inferior (SI) component. Conclusion: The Bspline algorithm allows for acceptable DIR results in the abdominal region, exhibiting the property of anatomical consistency of the computed field. Computed trajectories are in agreement with clinical expectations (small and prevalent SI displacements), since patients lie wearing semi-rigid immobilizing masks. In future, the model could be used for retrospective estimation of organ motion during treatment, as guided by the breathing surrogate signal.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955988},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To compare the performance of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for contour propagation and to evaluate the accuracy of DIR for use with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Methods: Five patients undergoing HDR ring and tandem brachytherapy were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent CT simulation and replanning prior to each fraction (3–5 fractions total). CT-to-CT DIR was performed using two commercially available software platforms: SmartAdapt, Varian Medical Systems (Demons) and Velocity AI, Velocity Medical Solutions (B-spline). Fraction 1 contours were deformed and propagated to each subsequent image set and compared tomore » contours manually drawn by an expert clinician. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC), defined as, DSC(A,B)=2(AandB)/(A+B) were calculated to quantify spatial overlap between manual (A) and deformed (B) contours. Additionally, clinician-assigned visual scores were used to describe and compare the performance of each DIR method and ultimately evaluate which was more clinically acceptable. Scoring was based on a 1–5 scale—with 1 meaning, “clinically acceptable with no contour changes” and 5 meaning, “clinically unacceptable”. Results: Statistically significant differences were not observed between the two DIR algorithms. The average DSC for the bladder, rectum and rectosigmoid were 0.82±0.08, 0.67±0.13 and 0.48±0.18, respectively. The poorest contour agreement was observed for the rectosigmoid due to limited soft tissue contrast and drastic anatomical changes, i.e., organ shape/filling. Two clinicians gave nearly equivalent average scores of 2.75±0.91 for SmartAdapt and 2.75±0.94 for Velocity AI—indicating that for a majority of the cases, more than one of the three contours evaluated required major modifications. Conclusion: Limitations of both DIR algorithms resulted in inaccuracies in contour propagation in the pelvic region, thus hampering the clinical utility of this technology. Further work is required to optimize these algorithms and take advantage of the potential of DIR for HDR brachytherapy planning.« less
  • Purpose: Respiratory Correlated CT (RCCT) scans to assess intra-fraction motion among pancreatic cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy allow for dose sparing of normal tissues, in particular for the duodenum. Contour propagation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from one reference respiratory phase to 9 other phases is time consuming. Deformable image registration (DIR) has been successfully used for high contrast disease sites but lower contrast for pancreatic tumors may compromise accuracy. This study evaluates the accuracy of Fast Free Form (FFF) registration-based contour propagation of the GTV on RCCT scans of pancreas cancer patients. Methods: Twenty-four pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectivelymore » studied; 20 had tumors in the pancreatic head/neck, 4 in the body/tail. Patients were simulated with RCCT and images were sorted into 10 respiratory phases. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the GTV for 5 phases (0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 90%). The FFF algorithm was used to map deformations between the EE (50%) phase and each of the other 4 phases. The resultant deformation fields served to propagate GTV contours from EE to the other phases. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), which measures agreement between the DIR-propagated and manually-delineated GTVs, was used to quantitatively examine DIR accuracy. Results: Average DSC over all scans and patients is 0.82 and standard deviation is 0.09 (DSC range 0.97–0.57). For GTV volumes above and below the median volume of 20.2 cc, a Wilcoxon rank-sum test shows significantly different DSC (p=0.0000002). For the GTVs above the median volume, average +/− SD is 0.85 +/− 0.07; and for the GTVs below, the average +/− SD is 0.75 +/−0.08. Conclusion: For pancreatic tumors, the FFF DIR algorithm accurately propagated the GTV between the images in different phases of RCCT, with improved performance for larger tumors.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate correlation of displacement vector fields (DVF) calculated by deformable image registration algorithms with motion parameters in helical axial and cone-beam CT images with motion artifacts. Methods: A mobile thorax phantom with well-known targets with different sizes that were made from water-equivalent material and inserted in foam to simulate lung lesions. The thorax phantom was imaged with helical, axial and cone-beam CT. The phantom was moved with a cyclic motion with different motion amplitudes and frequencies along the superior-inferior direction. Different deformable image registration algorithms including demons, fast demons, Horn-Shunck and iterative-optical-flow from the DIRART software were usedmore » to deform CT images for the phantom with different motion patterns. The CT images of the mobile phantom were deformed to CT images of the stationary phantom. Results: The values of displacement vectors calculated by deformable image registration algorithm correlated strongly with motion amplitude where large displacement vectors were calculated for CT images with large motion amplitudes. For example, the maximal displacement vectors were nearly equal to the motion amplitudes (5mm, 10mm or 20mm) at interfaces between the mobile targets lung tissue, while the minimal displacement vectors were nearly equal to negative the motion amplitudes. The maximal and minimal displacement vectors matched with edges of the blurred targets along the Z-axis (motion-direction), while DVF’s were small in the other directions. This indicates that the blurred edges by phantom motion were shifted largely to match with the actual target edge. These shifts were nearly equal to the motion amplitude. Conclusions: The DVF from deformable-image registration algorithms correlated well with motion amplitude of well-defined mobile targets. This can be used to extract motion parameters such as amplitude. However, as motion amplitudes increased, image artifacts increased significantly and that limited image quality and poor correlation between the motion amplitude and DVF was obtained.« less
  • Purpose: Deformable Image Registration (DIR) is gaining wider clinical acceptance in radiation oncology. The aim of this work is to characterise a DIR algorithm on publically available 4DCT lung images, such that comparison can be performed against other algorithms. We propose an evaluation method of registration accuracy that takes into account the initial misregistration of the datasets. Methods: The “DIR Validation dataset” ( http://www.creatis.insa-lyon.fr/rio/dir{sub v}alidation{sub d}ata ) provides benchmark data for evaluating 3D CT registration algorithms. It consists of six 4DCT lung datasets (1x1x2mm resolution) with 100 landmarks identified on the end-exhalation and end-inhalation phases. Images were registered to end-inhalationmore » using proprietary form of optical flow in commercial software (Mirada RTx, Mirada Medical, UK). Target registration error was measured before and after DIR, referred to as Initial Registration Error (IRE) and Final Registration Error (FRE). Results: The mean FRE over all landmarks was 1.37±1.81mm. FRE increased with IRE. Mean FRE of 0.86, 0.86, 1.53, 3.38, 4.45, 7.58mm was observed for IRE in the ranges 0–5, 5–10, 10–15, 15–20, 20–25, >25 mm. Higher FRE was observed at the inferior lung, where IRE was greater. Out-of-plane motion contributed more to IRE, and therefore to FRE. Maximum FRE of 20.6mm was observed for IRE of 32.1mm, located at the posterior of the middle lobe for dataset 2. Sub-voxel registration accuracy was achieved for up to 10mm IRE, and increased linearly at 0.3mm FRE/mm IRE thereafter. Conclusion: Publicly available clinical datasets enable algorithms to be compared objectively between publications. However, only reporting average TRE after registration can be misleading as the ability of an algorithm to correct for displacements varies with the IRE or position within the patient. Consequently, algorithms should be characterized using the entire range of initial displacements. For the algorithm assessed, clinically acceptable error within one voxel was achieved for IRE of up to 15mm. TK, AL, and MG are employees of Mirada Medical.« less
  • Purpose: Existing reports on gated radiation therapy focus mainly on optimizing dose delivery to the target structure. This work investigates the motion effects on radiation dose delivered to organs at risk (OAR) in respiratory gated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A new algorithmic tool of dose analysis is developed to evaluate the optimality of gating phase for dose sparing on OARs while ensuring adequate target coverage. Methods: Eight patients with pancreatic cancer were treated on a phase I prospective study employing 4DCT-based SBRT. For each patient, 4DCT scans are acquired and sorted into 10 respiratory phases (inhale-exhale- inhale). Treatment planningmore » is performed on the average CT image. The average CT is spatially registered to other phases. The resultant displacement field is then applied on the plan dose map to estimate the actual dose map for each phase. Dose values of each voxel are fitted to a sinusoidal function. Fitting parameters of dose variation, mean delivered dose and optimal gating phase for each voxel over respiration cycle are mapped on the dose volume. Results: The sinusoidal function accurately models the dose change during respiratory motion (mean fitting error 4.6%). In the eight patients, mean dose variation is 3.3 Gy on OARs with maximum of 13.7 Gy. Two patients have about 100cm{sup 3} volumes covered by more than 5 Gy deviation. The mean delivered dose maps are similar to plan dose with slight deformation. The optimal gating phase highly varies across the patient, with phase 5 or 6 on about 60% of the volume, and phase 0 on most of the rest. Conclusion: A new algorithmic tool is developed to conveniently quantify dose deviation on OARs from plan dose during the respiratory cycle. The proposed software facilitates the treatment planning process by providing the optimal respiratory gating phase for dose sparing on each OAR.« less