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Title: SU-F-J-68: Deformable Dose Accumulation for Voxel-Based Dose Tracking of PTV Cold Spots for Adaptive Radiotherapy of the Head and Neck

Abstract

Purpose: To utilize deformable dose accumulation (DDA) to determine how cold spots within the PTV change over the course of fractionated head and neck (H&N) radiotherapy. Methods: Voxel-based dose was tracked using a DDA platform. The DDA process consisted of B-spline-based deformable image registration (DIR) and dose accumulation between planning CT’s and daily cone-beam CT’s for 10 H&N cancer patients. Cold spots within the PTV (regions receiving less than the prescription, 70 Gy) were contoured on the cumulative dose distribution. These cold spots were mapped to each fraction, starting from the first fraction to determine how they changed. Spatial correlation between cold spot regions over each fraction, relative to the last fraction, was computed using the Jaccard index Jk (Mk,N), where N is the cold spot within the PTV at the end of the treatment, and Mk the same region for fraction k. Results: Figure 1 shows good spatial correlation between cold spots, and highlights expansion of the cold spot region over the course of treatment, as a result of setup uncertainties, and anatomical changes. Figure 2 shows a plot of Jk versus fraction number k averaged over 10 patients. This confirms the good spatial correlation between cold spots overmore » the course of treatment. On average, Jk reaches ∼90% at fraction 22, suggesting that possible intervention (e.g. reoptimization) may mitigate the cold spot region. The cold spot, D99, averaged over 10 patients corresponded to a dose of ∼65 Gy, relative to the prescription dose of 70 Gy. Conclusion: DDA-based tracking provides spatial dose information, which can be used to monitor dose in different regions of the treatment plan, thereby enabling appropriate mid-treatment interventions. This work is supported in part by Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22632198
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BEAMS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRELATIONS; HEAD; IMAGES; NECK; NEOPLASMS; PARTICLE TRACKS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Liu, C, Chetty, I, Mao, W, Kumarasiri, A, Zhong, H, Brown, S, and Siddiqui, F. SU-F-J-68: Deformable Dose Accumulation for Voxel-Based Dose Tracking of PTV Cold Spots for Adaptive Radiotherapy of the Head and Neck. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955976.
Liu, C, Chetty, I, Mao, W, Kumarasiri, A, Zhong, H, Brown, S, & Siddiqui, F. SU-F-J-68: Deformable Dose Accumulation for Voxel-Based Dose Tracking of PTV Cold Spots for Adaptive Radiotherapy of the Head and Neck. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955976.
Liu, C, Chetty, I, Mao, W, Kumarasiri, A, Zhong, H, Brown, S, and Siddiqui, F. 2016. "SU-F-J-68: Deformable Dose Accumulation for Voxel-Based Dose Tracking of PTV Cold Spots for Adaptive Radiotherapy of the Head and Neck". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955976.
@article{osti_22632198,
title = {SU-F-J-68: Deformable Dose Accumulation for Voxel-Based Dose Tracking of PTV Cold Spots for Adaptive Radiotherapy of the Head and Neck},
author = {Liu, C and Chetty, I and Mao, W and Kumarasiri, A and Zhong, H and Brown, S and Siddiqui, F},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To utilize deformable dose accumulation (DDA) to determine how cold spots within the PTV change over the course of fractionated head and neck (H&N) radiotherapy. Methods: Voxel-based dose was tracked using a DDA platform. The DDA process consisted of B-spline-based deformable image registration (DIR) and dose accumulation between planning CT’s and daily cone-beam CT’s for 10 H&N cancer patients. Cold spots within the PTV (regions receiving less than the prescription, 70 Gy) were contoured on the cumulative dose distribution. These cold spots were mapped to each fraction, starting from the first fraction to determine how they changed. Spatial correlation between cold spot regions over each fraction, relative to the last fraction, was computed using the Jaccard index Jk (Mk,N), where N is the cold spot within the PTV at the end of the treatment, and Mk the same region for fraction k. Results: Figure 1 shows good spatial correlation between cold spots, and highlights expansion of the cold spot region over the course of treatment, as a result of setup uncertainties, and anatomical changes. Figure 2 shows a plot of Jk versus fraction number k averaged over 10 patients. This confirms the good spatial correlation between cold spots over the course of treatment. On average, Jk reaches ∼90% at fraction 22, suggesting that possible intervention (e.g. reoptimization) may mitigate the cold spot region. The cold spot, D99, averaged over 10 patients corresponded to a dose of ∼65 Gy, relative to the prescription dose of 70 Gy. Conclusion: DDA-based tracking provides spatial dose information, which can be used to monitor dose in different regions of the treatment plan, thereby enabling appropriate mid-treatment interventions. This work is supported in part by Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955976},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the anatomical changes and associated dosimetric consequences to the pharyngeal constrictor (PC) that occurs during head and neck radiotherapy (H&N RT). Methods: A cohort of 13 oro-pharyngeal cancer patients, who had daily CBCT’s for localization, was retrospectively studied. On every 5th CBCT, PC was manually delineated by a radiation oncologist. The anterior-posterior PC thickness was measured at the C3 level. Delivered dose to PC was estimated by calculating daily doses on CBCT’s, and accumulating to corresponding planning CT images. For accumulation, a parameter-optimized B- spline-based deformable image registration algorithm (Elastix) was used, in conjunction with an energy-massmore » mapping dose transfer algorithm. Mean and maximum dose (Dmean, Dmax) to PC was determined and compared with corresponding planned quantities. Results: The mean (±standard deviation) volume increase (ΔV) and thickness increase (Δt) over the course of 35 total fractions were 54±33% (11.9±7.6 cc), and 63±39% (2.9±1.9 mm), respectively. The resultant cumulative mean dose increase from planned dose to PC (ΔDmean) was 1.4±1.3% (0.9±0.8 Gy), while the maximum dose increase (ΔDmax) was 0.0±1.6% (0.0±1.1 Gy). Patients with adaptive replanning (n=6) showed a smaller mean dose increase than those without (n=7); 0.5±0.2% (0.3±0.1 Gy) vs. 2.2±1.4% (1.4±0.9 Gy). There was a statistically significant (p<0.0001) strong correlation between ΔDmean and Δt (Pearson coefficient r=0.78), and a moderate-to-strong correlation (r=0.52) between ΔDmean and ΔV. Correlation between ΔDmean and weight loss ΔW (r=0.1), as well as ΔV and ΔW (r=0.2) were negligible. Conclusion: Patients were found to undergo considerable anatomical changes to pharyngeal constrictor during H&N RT, resulting in non-negligible dose deviations from intended dose. Results are indicative that pharyngeal constrictor thickness, measured at C3 level, is a good predictor for the dose change to the organ. Daily deformable registration and dose accumulation provide a reliable means to assess important anatomical and dosimetric changes to pharyngeal constrictor occurring during treatment. This work was supported in part by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of using computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) for the application of calculating the “dose of the day” received by a head and neck patient. Methods: NiftyReg is an open-source registration package implemented in our institution. The affine registration uses a Block Matching-based approach, while the deformable registration is a GPU implementation of the popular B-spline Free Form Deformation algorithm. Two independent tests were performed to assess the suitability of our registrations methodology for “dose of the day” calculations in a deformed CT. Amore » geometric evaluation was performed to assess the ability of the DIR method to map identical structures between the CT and CBCT datasets. Features delineated in the planning CT were warped and compared with features manually drawn on the CBCT. The authors computed the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transformation, and centre of mass distance between features. A dosimetric evaluation was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of the registrations errors in the application proposed and to identify the limitations of the approximations used. Dose calculations for the same intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan on the deformed CT and replan CT were compared. Dose distributions were compared in terms of dose differences (DD), gamma analysis, target coverage, and dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses calculated in a rigidly aligned CT and directly in an extended CBCT were also evaluated. Results: A mean value of 0.850 in DSC was achieved in overlap between manually delineated and warped features, with the distance between surfaces being less than 2 mm on over 90% of the pixels. Deformable registration was clearly superior to rigid registration in mapping identical structures between the two datasets. The dose recalculated in the deformed CT is a good match to the dose calculated on a replan CT. The DD is smaller than 2% of the prescribed dose on 90% of the body's voxels and it passes a 2% and 2 mm gamma-test on over 95% of the voxels. Target coverage similarity was assessed in terms of the 95%-isodose volumes. A mean value of 0.962 was obtained for the DSC, while the distance between surfaces is less than 2 mm in 95.4% of the pixels. The method proposed provided adequate dose estimation, closer to the gold standard than the other two approaches. Differences in DVH curves were mainly due to differences in the OARs definition (manual vs warped) and not due to differences in dose estimation (dose calculated in replan CT vs dose calculated in deformed CT). Conclusions: Deforming a planning CT to match a daily CBCT provides the tools needed for the calculation of the “dose of the day” without the need to acquire a new CT. The initial clinical application of our method will be weekly offline calculations of the “dose of the day,” and use this information to inform adaptive radiotherapy (ART). The work here presented is a first step into a full implementation of a “dose-driven” online ART.« less
  • Purpose: The aims of this work were to evaluate the performance of several deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms implemented in our in-house software (NiftyReg) and the uncertainties inherent to using different algorithms for dose warping. Methods: The authors describe a DIR based adaptive radiotherapy workflow, using CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The transformations that mapped the anatomy between the two time points were obtained using four different DIR approaches available in NiftyReg. These included a standard unidirectional algorithm and more sophisticated bidirectional ones that encourage or ensure inverse consistency. The forward (CT-to-CBCT) deformation vector fields (DVFs) were used tomore » propagate the CT Hounsfield units and structures to the daily geometry for “dose of the day” calculations, while the backward (CBCT-to-CT) DVFs were used to remap the dose of the day onto the planning CT (pCT). Data from five head and neck patients were used to evaluate the performance of each implementation based on geometrical matching, physical properties of the DVFs, and similarity between warped dose distributions. Geometrical matching was verified in terms of dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transform, false positives, and false negatives. The physical properties of the DVFs were assessed calculating the harmonic energy, determinant of the Jacobian, and inverse consistency error of the transformations. Dose distributions were displayed on the pCT dose space and compared using dose difference (DD), distance to dose difference, and dose volume histograms. Results: All the DIR algorithms gave similar results in terms of geometrical matching, with an average DSC of 0.85 ± 0.08, but the underlying properties of the DVFs varied in terms of smoothness and inverse consistency. When comparing the doses warped by different algorithms, we found a root mean square DD of 1.9% ± 0.8% of the prescribed dose (pD) and that an average of 9% ± 4% of voxels within the treated volume failed a 2%pD DD-test (DD{sub 2%-pp}). Larger DD{sub 2%-pp} was found within the high dose gradient (21% ± 6%) and regions where the CBCT quality was poorer (28% ± 9%). The differences when estimating the mean and maximum dose delivered to organs-at-risk were up to 2.0%pD and 2.8%pD, respectively. Conclusions: The authors evaluated several DIR algorithms for CT-to-CBCT registrations. In spite of all methods resulting in comparable geometrical matching, the choice of DIR implementation leads to uncertainties in dose warped, particularly in regions of high gradient and/or poor imaging quality.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreementmore » of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours.” Conclusions: Use of DIR-based contour propagation in the routine clinical setting is expected to increase the efficiency of H and N replanning, reducing the amount of time needed for manual target and organ delineations.« less