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Title: SU-F-J-41: Experimental Validation of a Cascaded Linear System Model for MVCBCT with a Multi-Layer EPID

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the use of a cascaded linear system model for MV cone-beam CT (CBCT) using a multi-layer (MLI) electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and provide experimental insight into image formation. A validated 3D model provides insight into salient factors affecting reconstructed image quality, allowing potential for optimizing detector design for CBCT applications. Methods: A cascaded linear system model was developed to investigate the potential improvement in reconstructed image quality for MV CBCT using an MLI EPID. Inputs to the three-dimensional (3D) model include projection space MTF and NPS. Experimental validation was performed on a prototype MLI detector installed on the portal imaging arm of a Varian TrueBeam radiotherapy system. CBCT scans of up to 898 projections over 360 degrees were acquired at exposures of 16 and 64 MU. Image volumes were reconstructed using a Feldkamp-type (FDK) filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm. Flat field images and scans of a Catphan model 604 phantom were acquired. The effect of 2×2 and 4×4 detector binning was also examined. Results: Using projection flat fields as an input, examination of the modeled and measured NPS in the axial plane exhibits good agreement. Binning projection images was shown tomore » improve axial slice SDNR by a factor of approximately 1.4. This improvement is largely driven by a decrease in image noise of roughly 20%. However, this effect is accompanied by a subsequent loss in image resolution. Conclusion: The measured axial NPS shows good agreement with the theoretical calculation using a linear system model. Binning of projection images improves SNR of large objects on the Catphan phantom by decreasing noise. Specific imaging tasks will dictate the implementation image binning to two-dimensional projection images. The project was partially supported by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc. and grant No. R01CA188446-01 from the National Cancer Institute.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]; ; ;  [3]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. (United States)
  2. Varian Medical Systems, Dattwil, Aargau (Switzerland)
  3. Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22632173
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ALGORITHMS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGES; NEOPLASMS; OPTIMIZATION; PHANTOMS; RADIOTHERAPY; VALIDATION

Citation Formats

Hu, Y, Rottmann, J, Myronakis, M, Berbeco, R, Fueglistaller, R, Morf, D, Wang, A, Shedlock, D, and Star-Lack, J. SU-F-J-41: Experimental Validation of a Cascaded Linear System Model for MVCBCT with a Multi-Layer EPID. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955949.
Hu, Y, Rottmann, J, Myronakis, M, Berbeco, R, Fueglistaller, R, Morf, D, Wang, A, Shedlock, D, & Star-Lack, J. SU-F-J-41: Experimental Validation of a Cascaded Linear System Model for MVCBCT with a Multi-Layer EPID. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955949.
Hu, Y, Rottmann, J, Myronakis, M, Berbeco, R, Fueglistaller, R, Morf, D, Wang, A, Shedlock, D, and Star-Lack, J. Wed . "SU-F-J-41: Experimental Validation of a Cascaded Linear System Model for MVCBCT with a Multi-Layer EPID". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955949.
@article{osti_22632173,
title = {SU-F-J-41: Experimental Validation of a Cascaded Linear System Model for MVCBCT with a Multi-Layer EPID},
author = {Hu, Y and Rottmann, J and Myronakis, M and Berbeco, R and Fueglistaller, R and Morf, D and Wang, A and Shedlock, D and Star-Lack, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the use of a cascaded linear system model for MV cone-beam CT (CBCT) using a multi-layer (MLI) electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and provide experimental insight into image formation. A validated 3D model provides insight into salient factors affecting reconstructed image quality, allowing potential for optimizing detector design for CBCT applications. Methods: A cascaded linear system model was developed to investigate the potential improvement in reconstructed image quality for MV CBCT using an MLI EPID. Inputs to the three-dimensional (3D) model include projection space MTF and NPS. Experimental validation was performed on a prototype MLI detector installed on the portal imaging arm of a Varian TrueBeam radiotherapy system. CBCT scans of up to 898 projections over 360 degrees were acquired at exposures of 16 and 64 MU. Image volumes were reconstructed using a Feldkamp-type (FDK) filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm. Flat field images and scans of a Catphan model 604 phantom were acquired. The effect of 2×2 and 4×4 detector binning was also examined. Results: Using projection flat fields as an input, examination of the modeled and measured NPS in the axial plane exhibits good agreement. Binning projection images was shown to improve axial slice SDNR by a factor of approximately 1.4. This improvement is largely driven by a decrease in image noise of roughly 20%. However, this effect is accompanied by a subsequent loss in image resolution. Conclusion: The measured axial NPS shows good agreement with the theoretical calculation using a linear system model. Binning of projection images improves SNR of large objects on the Catphan phantom by decreasing noise. Specific imaging tasks will dictate the implementation image binning to two-dimensional projection images. The project was partially supported by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc. and grant No. R01CA188446-01 from the National Cancer Institute.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955949},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To implement a depth dependent gain and blur cascaded linear system model (CLSM) for optimizing columnar structured CsI indirect conversion flat panel imager (FPI) for advanced imaging applications. Methods: For experimental validation, depth dependent escape efficiency, e(z), was extracted from PHS measurement of different CsI scintillators (thickness, substrate and light output). The inherent MTF and DQE of CsI was measured using high resolution CMOS sensor. For CLSM, e(z) and the depth dependent MTF(f,z), were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation (Geant4) of optical photon transport through columnar CsI. Previous work showed that Monte Carlo simulation for CsI was hindered bymore » the non-ideality of its columnar structure. In the present work we allowed variation in columnar width with depth, and assumed diffusive reflective backing and columns. Monte Carlo simulation was performed using an optical point source placed at different depth of the CsI layer, from which MTF(z,f) and e(z) were computed. The resulting e(z) with excellent matching with experimental measurements were then applied to the CLSM, Monte Carlo simulation was repeated until the modeled MTF, DQE(f) also match experimental measurement. Results: For a 150 micron FOS HL type CsI, e(z) varies between 0.56 to 0.45, and the MTF at 14 cycles/mm varies between 62.1% to 3.9%, from the front to the back of the scintillator. The overall MTF and DQE(f) at all frequencies are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements at all frequencies. Conclusion: We have developed a CLSM for columnar CsI scintillators with depth dependent gain and MTF, which were estimated from Monte Carlo simulation with novel optical simulation settings. Preliminary results showed excellent agreement between simulation results and experimental measurements. Future work is aimed at extending this approach to optimize CsI screen optic design and sensor structure for achieving higher DQE(f) in cone-beam CT, which uses high kVp.« less
  • Purpose: Integrated linac-MR systems are uniquely suited for real time tumor tracking during radiation treatment. Understanding the magnetic field dose effects and incorporating them in treatment planning is paramount for linac-MR clinical implementation. We experimentally validated the EGSnrc dose calculations in the presence of a magnetic field parallel to the radiation beam travel. Methods: Two cylindrical bore electromagnets produced a 0.21 T magnetic field parallel to the central axis of a 6 MV photon beam. A parallel plate ion chamber was used to measure the PDD in a polystyrene phantom, placed inside the bore in two setups: phantom top surfacemore » coinciding with the magnet bore center (183 cm SSD), and with the magnet bore’s top surface (170 cm SSD). We measured the field of the magnet at several points and included the exact dimensions of the coils to generate a 3D magnetic field map in a finite element model. BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc simulated the PDD experiments in parallel magnetic field (i.e. 3D magnetic field included) and with no magnetic field. Results: With the phantom surface at the top of the electromagnet, the surface dose increased by 10% (compared to no-magnetic field), due to electrons being focused by the smaller fringe fields of the electromagnet. With the phantom surface at the bore center, the surface dose increased by 30% since extra 13 cm of air column was in relatively higher magnetic field (>0.13T) in the magnet bore. EGSnrc Monte Carlo code correctly calculated the radiation dose with and without the magnetic field, and all points passed the 2%, 2 mm Gamma criterion when the ion chamber’s entrance window and air cavity were included in the simulated phantom. Conclusion: A parallel magnetic field increases the surface and buildup dose during irradiation. The EGSnrc package can model these magnetic field dose effects accurately. Dr. Fallone is a co-founder and CEO of MagnetTx Oncology Solutions (under discussions to license Alberta bi-planar linac MR for commercialization).« less
  • Purpose: To address and lift the limited degree of freedom (DoF) of globally bilinear motion components such as those based on principal components analysis (PCA), for encoding and modeling volumetric deformation motion. Methods: We provide a systematic approach to obtaining a multi-linear decomposition (MLD) and associated motion model from deformation vector field (DVF) data. We had previously introduced MLD for capturing multi-way relationships between DVF variables, without being restricted by the bilinear component format of PCA-based models. PCA-based modeling is commonly used for encoding patient-specific deformation as per planning 4D-CT images, and aiding on-board motion estimation during radiotherapy. However, themore » bilinear space-time decomposition inherently limits the DoF of such models by the small number of respiratory phases. While this limit is not reached in model studies using analytical or digital phantoms with low-rank motion, it compromises modeling power in the presence of relative motion, asymmetries and hysteresis, etc, which are often observed in patient data. Specifically, a low-DoF model will spuriously couple incoherent motion components, compromising its adaptability to on-board deformation changes. By the multi-linear format of extracted motion components, MLD-based models can encode higher-DoF deformation structure. Results: We conduct mathematical and experimental comparisons between PCA- and MLD-based models. A set of temporally-sampled analytical trajectories provides a synthetic, high-rank DVF; trajectories correspond to respiratory and cardiac motion factors, including different relative frequencies and spatial variations. Additionally, a digital XCAT phantom is used to simulate a lung lesion deforming incoherently with respect to the body, which adheres to a simple respiratory trend. In both cases, coupling of incoherent motion components due to a low model DoF is clearly demonstrated. Conclusion: Multi-linear decomposition can enable decoupling of distinct motion factors in high-rank DVF measurements. This may improve motion model expressiveness and adaptability to on-board deformation, aiding model-based image reconstruction for target verification. NIH Grant No. R01-184173.« less
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