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Title: SU-F-J-09: Radioactive Seed Localization for Breast Lumpectomy - Towards Optimization

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this work is to propose a method to optimize radioactive source localization (RSL) for non-palpable breast cancer surgery. RSL is commonly used as a guiding technique during surgery for excision of non-palpable tumors. A collimated hand-held detector is used to localize radioactive sources implanted in tumors. Incisions made by the surgeon are based on maximum observed detector counts, and tumors are subsequently resected based on an arbitrary estimate of the counts expected at the surgical margin boundary. This work focuses on building a framework to predict detector counts expected throughout the procedure to improve surgical margins. Methods: A gamma detection system called the Neoprobe GDS was used for this work. The probe consists of a cesium zinc telluride crystal and a collimator. For this work, an I-125 Best Medical model 2301 source was used. The source was placed in three different phantoms, a PMMA, a Breast (25%- glandular tissue/75%- adipose tissue) and a Breast (75-25) phantom with a backscatter thickness of 6 cm. Counts detected by the probe were recorded with varying amounts of phantom thicknesses placed on top of the source. A calibration curve was generated using MATLAB based on the counts recorded for themore » calibration dataset acquired with the PMMA phantom. Results: The observed detector counts data used as the validation set was accurately predicted to within ±3.2%, ±6.9%, ±8.4% for the PMMA, Breast (75-25), Breast (25–75) phantom respectively. The average difference between predicted and observed counts was −0.4%, 2.4%, 1.4% with a standard deviation of 1.2 %, 1.8%, 3.4% for the PMMA, Breast (75-25), Breast (25–75) phantom respectively. Conclusion: The results of this work provide a basis for characterization of a detector used for RSL. Counts were predicted to within ±9% for three different phantoms without the application of a density correction factor.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22632145
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ADIPOSE TISSUE; CALIBRATION; COLLIMATORS; CORRECTIONS; DATASETS; GAMMA DETECTION; IODINE 125; MAMMARY GLANDS; NEOPLASMS; OPTIMIZATION; PHANTOMS; PMMA; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS; RADIATION SOURCES; SURGERY; TELLURIDES; THICKNESS; ZINC

Citation Formats

Aima, M, Viscariello, N, Patton, T, and Bednarz, B. SU-F-J-09: Radioactive Seed Localization for Breast Lumpectomy - Towards Optimization. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955917.
Aima, M, Viscariello, N, Patton, T, & Bednarz, B. SU-F-J-09: Radioactive Seed Localization for Breast Lumpectomy - Towards Optimization. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955917.
Aima, M, Viscariello, N, Patton, T, and Bednarz, B. 2016. "SU-F-J-09: Radioactive Seed Localization for Breast Lumpectomy - Towards Optimization". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955917.
@article{osti_22632145,
title = {SU-F-J-09: Radioactive Seed Localization for Breast Lumpectomy - Towards Optimization},
author = {Aima, M and Viscariello, N and Patton, T and Bednarz, B},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The aim of this work is to propose a method to optimize radioactive source localization (RSL) for non-palpable breast cancer surgery. RSL is commonly used as a guiding technique during surgery for excision of non-palpable tumors. A collimated hand-held detector is used to localize radioactive sources implanted in tumors. Incisions made by the surgeon are based on maximum observed detector counts, and tumors are subsequently resected based on an arbitrary estimate of the counts expected at the surgical margin boundary. This work focuses on building a framework to predict detector counts expected throughout the procedure to improve surgical margins. Methods: A gamma detection system called the Neoprobe GDS was used for this work. The probe consists of a cesium zinc telluride crystal and a collimator. For this work, an I-125 Best Medical model 2301 source was used. The source was placed in three different phantoms, a PMMA, a Breast (25%- glandular tissue/75%- adipose tissue) and a Breast (75-25) phantom with a backscatter thickness of 6 cm. Counts detected by the probe were recorded with varying amounts of phantom thicknesses placed on top of the source. A calibration curve was generated using MATLAB based on the counts recorded for the calibration dataset acquired with the PMMA phantom. Results: The observed detector counts data used as the validation set was accurately predicted to within ±3.2%, ±6.9%, ±8.4% for the PMMA, Breast (75-25), Breast (25–75) phantom respectively. The average difference between predicted and observed counts was −0.4%, 2.4%, 1.4% with a standard deviation of 1.2 %, 1.8%, 3.4% for the PMMA, Breast (75-25), Breast (25–75) phantom respectively. Conclusion: The results of this work provide a basis for characterization of a detector used for RSL. Counts were predicted to within ±9% for three different phantoms without the application of a density correction factor.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955917},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose To investigate the feasibility of utilizing carbon fiducials to increase localization accuracy of lumpectomy cavity for partial breast irradiation (PBI). Methods Carbon fiducials were placed intraoperatively in the lumpectomy cavity following resection of breast cancer in 11 patients. The patients were scheduled to receive whole breast irradiation (WBI) with a boost or 3D-conformal PBI. WBI patients were initially setup to skin tattoos using lasers, followed by orthogonal kV on-board-imaging (OBI) matching to bone per clinical practice. Cone beam CT (CBCT) was acquired weekly for offline review. For the boost component of WBI and PBI, patients were setup with lasers,more » followed by OBI matching to fiducials, with final alignment by CBCT matching to fiducials. Using carbon fiducials as a surrogate for the lumpectomy cavity and CBCT matching to fiducials as the gold standard, setup uncertainties to lasers, OBI bone, OBI fiducials, and CBCT breast were compared. Results Minimal imaging artifacts were introduced by fiducials on the planning CT and CBCT. The fiducials were sufficiently visible on OBI for online localization. The mean magnitude and standard deviation of setup errors were 8.4mm ± 5.3 mm (n=84), 7.3mm ± 3.7mm (n=87), 2.2mm ± 1.6mm (n=40) and 4.8mm ± 2.6mm (n=87), for lasers, OBI bone, OBI fiducials and CBCT breast tissue, respectively. Significant migration occurred in one of 39 implanted fiducials in a patient with a large postoperative seroma. Conclusion OBI carbon fiducial-based setup can improve localization accuracy with minimal imaging artifacts. With increased localization accuracy, setup uncertainties can be reduced from 8mm using OBI bone matching to 3mm using OBI fiducial matching for PBI treatment. This work demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing carbon fiducials to increase localization accuracy to the lumpectomy cavity for PBI. This may be particularly attractive for localization in the setting of proton therapy and other scenarios in which metal clips are contraindicated.« less
  • Purpose: Three-dimensional conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI-3D-CRT) is commonly associated with the treatment of large amounts of normal breast tissue. We hypothesized that a planning tumor volume (PTV) generation based on an expansion of the pre-lumpectomy (pre-LPC) intact tumor volume would result in smaller volumes of irradiated normal breast tissue compared with using a PTV based on the post-lumpectomy cavity (post-LPC). Use of PTVs based on the pre-LPC might also result in greater patient eligibility for APBI-3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: Forty-one early-stage breast cancers were analyzed. Preoperative imaging was used to determine a pre-LPC tumor volume. PTVs were developedmore » in the pre- and post-LPC settings as per National Surgical Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP)-B39 guidelines. The pre- and post-LPC PTV volumes were compared and eligibility for APBI-3D-CRT determined using NSABP-B39 criteria. Results: The post-LPC PTV exceeded the pre-LPC PTV in all cases. The median volume for the pre- and post-LPC PTVs were 93 cm{sup 3} (range, 24-570 cm{sup 3}) and 250 cm{sup 3} (range, 45-879 cm{sup 3}), respectively, p <0.001. The difference between pre- and post-LPC PTVs represented a median of 165 cc (range, 21-482 cc) or 16% (range, 3%-42%) of the whole breast volume. Three of 41 vs. 13 of 41 cases were ineligible for APBI-3D-CRT when using the pre- and post-LPC PTVs, respectively. Conclusion: PTVs based on pre-LPC tumor expansion are likely associated with reduced amounts of irradiated normal breast tissue compared with post-LPC PTVs, possibly leading to greater patient eligibility for APBI-3D-CRT. These findings support future investigation as to the feasibility of neoadjuvant APBI-3D-CRT.« less
  • Background: It is generally believed that ipsilateral breast failures (IBFs) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) develop from incompletely eradicated carcinoma. We previously suggested that monomorphic epithelial proliferations (MEPs) in the breast may be a pool of partially transformed clones from which breast carcinomas can arise and that radiation therapy (RT) may also reduce the risk of IBF by eradicating MEPs. We examined salvage mastectomy specimens in patients experiencing an IBF to define the relationship between MEPs and IBFs and an additional potential mechanism for IBF risk reduction by RT. Methods and Materials: The location, number, and distribution of radiation changes andmore » MEPs relative to 51 IBFs were mapped in salvage mastectomy specimens from BCT patients with adequately excised, initial carcinomas (negative lumpectomy margins). Results: All 51 salvage mastectomies had diffuse, late radiation changes. None had active fibrocystic lesions. MEPs were predominantly located in the immediate vicinity of the IBFs. A mean of 39% of MEP cases were located within the IBF, 46% were located within 2 cm of the IBF, and 14% were 2-3 cm from the IBF. Conclusions: MEPs appear to be a pool of partially transformed precursor lesions that can give rise to ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinomas (CAs). Many IBFs may arise from MEPs that reemerge after RT. Radiation may also reduce IBF risk after BCT (including in patients with negative margins) by primarily eradicating MEPs.« less
  • Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ≤3 cm, negative margins, and ≤3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adversemore » Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.« less
  • Purpose: In women with favorable early breast cancer treated by lumpectomy plus tamoxifen or anastrazole, it remains unclear whether whole breast radiotherapy is beneficial. Methods and Material: Between January 1996 and June 2004, the Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group (ABCSG) randomly assigned 869 women to receive breast radiotherapy {+-} boost (n 414) or not (n = 417) after breast-conserving surgery (ABCSG Study 8A). Favorable early breast cancer was specified as tumor size <3 cm, Grading 1 or 2, negative lymph nodes, positive estrogen and/or progesterone receptor status, and manageable by breast-conserving surgery. Breast radiotherapy was performed after lumpectomymore » with 2 tangential opposed breast fields with mean 50 Gy, plus boost in 71% of patients with mean 10 Gy, in a median of 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was local relapse-free survival; further endpoints were contralateral breast cancer, distant metastases, and disease-free and overall survival. The median follow-up was 53.8 months. Results: The mean age was 66 years. Overall, there were 21 local relapses, with 2 relapses in the radiotherapy group (5-y rate 0.4%) vs. 19 in the no-radiotherapy group (5.1%), respectively (p = 0.0001, hazard ratio 10.2). Overall relapses occurred in 30 patients, with 7 events in the radiotherapy group (5-y rate 2.1%) vs. 23 events in the no-radiotherapy group (6.1%) (p = 0.002, hazard ratio 3.5). No significant differences were found for distant metastases and overall survival. Conclusion: Breast radiotherapy {+-} boost in women with favorable early breast cancer after lumpectomy combined with tamoxifen/anastrazole leads to a significant reduction in local and overall relapse.« less