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Title: SU-F-J-06: Optimized Patient Inclusion for NaF PET Response-Based Biopsies

Abstract

Purpose: A method to guide mid-treatment biopsies using quantitative [F-18]NaF PET/CT response is being investigated in a clinical trial. This study aims to develop methodology to identify patients amenable to mid-treatment biopsy based on pre-treatment imaging characteristics. Methods: 35 metastatic prostate cancer patients had NaF PET/CT scans taken prior to the start of treatment and 9–12 weeks into treatment. For mid-treatment biopsy targeting, lesions must be at least 1.5 cm{sup 3} and located in a clinically feasible region (lumbar/sacral spine, pelvis, humerus, or femur). Three methods were developed based on number of lesions present prior to treatment: a feasibility-restricted method, a location-restricted method, and an unrestricted method. The feasibility restricted method only utilizes information from lesions meeting biopsy requirements in the pre-treatment scan. The unrestricted method accounts for all lesions present in the pre-treatment scan. For each method, optimized classification cutoffs for candidate patients were determined. Results: 13 of the 35 patients had enough lesions at the mid-treatment for biopsy candidacy. Of 1749 lesions identified in all 35 patients at mid-treatment, only 9.8% were amenable to biopsy. Optimizing the feasibility-restricted method required 4 lesions at pre-treatment meeting volume and region requirements for biopsy, resulting patient identification sensitivity of 0.8 andmore » specificity of 0.7. Of 6 false positive patients, only one patient lacked lesions for biopsy. Restricting for location alone showed poor results (sensitivity 0.2 and specificity 0.3). The optimized unrestricted method required patients have at least 37 lesions in pretreatment scan, resulting in a sensitivity of 0.8 and specificity of 0.8. There were 5 false positives, only one lacked lesions for biopsy. Conclusion: Incorporating the overall pre-treatment number of NaF PET/CT identified lesions provided best prediction for identifying candidate patients for mid-treatment biopsy. This study provides validity for prediction-based inclusion criteria that can be extended to various clinical trial scenarios. Funded by Prostate Cancer Foundation.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22632142
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BIOPSY; CLINICAL TRIALS; FEMUR; FLUORINE 18; METASTASES; NEOPLASMS; OPTIMIZATION; PATIENTS; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; PROSTATE; SENSITIVITY; SODIUM FLUORIDES; SPECIFICITY; VERTEBRAE

Citation Formats

Roth, A, Harmon, S, Perk, T, and Jeraj, R. SU-F-J-06: Optimized Patient Inclusion for NaF PET Response-Based Biopsies. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955914.
Roth, A, Harmon, S, Perk, T, & Jeraj, R. SU-F-J-06: Optimized Patient Inclusion for NaF PET Response-Based Biopsies. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955914.
Roth, A, Harmon, S, Perk, T, and Jeraj, R. 2016. "SU-F-J-06: Optimized Patient Inclusion for NaF PET Response-Based Biopsies". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955914.
@article{osti_22632142,
title = {SU-F-J-06: Optimized Patient Inclusion for NaF PET Response-Based Biopsies},
author = {Roth, A and Harmon, S and Perk, T and Jeraj, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: A method to guide mid-treatment biopsies using quantitative [F-18]NaF PET/CT response is being investigated in a clinical trial. This study aims to develop methodology to identify patients amenable to mid-treatment biopsy based on pre-treatment imaging characteristics. Methods: 35 metastatic prostate cancer patients had NaF PET/CT scans taken prior to the start of treatment and 9–12 weeks into treatment. For mid-treatment biopsy targeting, lesions must be at least 1.5 cm{sup 3} and located in a clinically feasible region (lumbar/sacral spine, pelvis, humerus, or femur). Three methods were developed based on number of lesions present prior to treatment: a feasibility-restricted method, a location-restricted method, and an unrestricted method. The feasibility restricted method only utilizes information from lesions meeting biopsy requirements in the pre-treatment scan. The unrestricted method accounts for all lesions present in the pre-treatment scan. For each method, optimized classification cutoffs for candidate patients were determined. Results: 13 of the 35 patients had enough lesions at the mid-treatment for biopsy candidacy. Of 1749 lesions identified in all 35 patients at mid-treatment, only 9.8% were amenable to biopsy. Optimizing the feasibility-restricted method required 4 lesions at pre-treatment meeting volume and region requirements for biopsy, resulting patient identification sensitivity of 0.8 and specificity of 0.7. Of 6 false positive patients, only one patient lacked lesions for biopsy. Restricting for location alone showed poor results (sensitivity 0.2 and specificity 0.3). The optimized unrestricted method required patients have at least 37 lesions in pretreatment scan, resulting in a sensitivity of 0.8 and specificity of 0.8. There were 5 false positives, only one lacked lesions for biopsy. Conclusion: Incorporating the overall pre-treatment number of NaF PET/CT identified lesions provided best prediction for identifying candidate patients for mid-treatment biopsy. This study provides validity for prediction-based inclusion criteria that can be extended to various clinical trial scenarios. Funded by Prostate Cancer Foundation.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955914},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To determine the utility of COX-2 expression as a response predictor for patients with rectal cancer who are undergoing neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT). Methods and Materials: Pretreatment biopsies (PTB) from 49 patients who underwent RCT were included. COX-2 and proliferation in PTB were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL stain. Response to treatment was assessed by a 5-point tumor-regression grade (TRG) based on the ratio of residual tumor to fibrosis. Results: Good response (TRG 1 + 2), moderate response (TRG 3), and poor response (TRG 4 + 5) were seen in 21 patients (42%), 11 patientsmore » (22%), and 17 patients (34%), respectively. Patients with COX-2 overexpression in PTB were more likely to demonstrate moderate or poor response (TRG 3 + 4) to treatment than were those with normal COX-2 expression (p = 0.026, chi-square test). Similarly, poor response was more likely if patients had low levels of spontaneous apoptosis in PTBs (p = 0.0007, chi-square test). Conclusions: COX-2 overexpression and reduced apoptosis in PTB can predict poor response of rectal cancer to RCT. As COX-2 inhibitors are commercially available, their administration to patients who overexpress COX-2 warrants assessment in clinical trials in an attempt to increase overall response rates.« less
  • Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment for early-stage lung cancer. The histologic subtype of surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma is recognized as a prognostic factor, with the presence of solid or micropapillary patterns predicting poor outcomes. We describe the outcomes after SBRT for early-stage lung adenocarcinoma stratified by histologic subtype. Methods and Materials: We identified 119 consecutive patients (124 lesions) with stage I to IIA lung adenocarcinoma who had undergone definitive SBRT at our institution from August 2008 to August 2015 and had undergone core biopsy. Histologic subtyping was performed according to the 2015 Worldmore » Health Organization classification. Of the 124 tumors, 37 (30%) were a high-risk subtype, defined as containing a component of solid and/or micropapillary pattern. The cumulative incidences of local, nodal, regional, and distant failure were compared between the high-risk and non–high-risk adenocarcinoma subtypes using Gray's test, and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated from propensity score–weighted Cox regression models. Results: The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 17 months and for surviving patients was 21 months. The 1-year cumulative incidence of and adjusted HR for local, nodal, regional, and distant failure in high-risk versus non–high-risk lesions was 7.3% versus 2.7% (HR 16.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5-81.4), 14.8% versus 2.6% (HR 3.8; 95% CI 0.95-15.0), 4.0% versus 1.2% (HR 20.9; 95% CI 2.3-192.3), and 22.7% versus 3.6% (HR 6.9; 95% CI 2.2-21.1), respectively. No significant difference was seen with regard to overall survival. Conclusions: The outcomes after SBRT for early-stage adenocarcinoma of the lung correlate highly with histologic subtype, with micropapillary and solid tumors portending significantly higher rates of locoregional and metastatic progression. In this context, the histologic subtype determined from core biopsies is a prognostic factor and could have important implications for patient selection, adjuvant treatment, biopsy methods, and clinical trial design.« less
  • Gene expression mapping using microarray analysis has identified useful gene signatures for predicting outcome. However, little of this has been translated into clinically effective diagnostic tools as microarrays require high quality fresh-frozen tissue samples. We describe a methodology of multiplexed in situ hybridization (ISH) using a novel combination of quantum dot (QD)-labeled oligonucleotide probes and spectral imaging analysis in routinely processed, formalin-fixed paraffin embedded human biopsies. The conditions for QD-ISH were optimized using a poly d(T) oligonucleotide in decalcified bone marrow samples. Single and multiplex QD-ISH was performed in samples with acute leukemia and follicular lymphoma using oligonucleotide probes formore » myeloperoxidase, bcl-2, survivin, and XIAP. Spectral imaging was used for post hybridization tissue analysis, enabling separation of spatially colocalized signals. The method allows quantitative characterization of multiple gene expression using non-bleaching fluorochromes. This is expected to facilitate multiplex in situ transcript detection in routinely processed human clinical tissue.« less
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