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Title: SU-F-I-80: Correction for Bias in a Channelized Hotelling Model Observer Caused by Temporally Variable Non-Stationary Noise

Abstract

Purpose: Application of a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) over a wide range of x-ray angiography detector target dose (DTD) levels demonstrated substantial bias for conditions yielding low detectability indices (d’), including low DTD and small test objects. The purpose of this work was to develop theory and methods to correct this bias. Methods: A hypothesis was developed wherein the measured detectability index (d’b) for a known test object is positively biased by temporally variable non-stationary noise in the images. Hotelling’s T2 test statistic provided the foundation for a mathematical theory which accounts for independent contributions to the measured d’b value from both the test object (d’o) and non-stationary noise (d’ns). Experimental methods were developed to directly estimate d’o by determining d’ns and subtracting it from d’b, in accordance with the theory. Specifically, d’ns was determined from two sets of images from which the traditional test object was withheld. This method was applied to angiography images with DTD levels in the range 0 to 240 nGy and for disk-shaped iodine-based contrast targets with diameters 0.5 to 4.0 mm. Results: Bias in d’ was evidenced by d’b values which exceeded values expected from a quantum limited imaging system and decreasing objectmore » size and DTD. d’ns increased with decreasing DTD, reaching a maximum of 2.6 for DTD = 0. Bias-corrected d’o estimates demonstrated sub-quantum limited performance of the x-ray angiography for low DTD. Findings demonstrated that the source of non-stationary noise was detector electronic readout noise. Conclusion: Theory and methods to estimate and correct bias in CHO measurements from temporally variable non-stationary noise were presented. The temporal non-stationary noise was shown to be due to electronic readout noise. This method facilitates accurate estimates of d’ values over a large range of object size and detector target dose.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22632140
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BLOOD VESSELS; CORRECTIONS; IMAGES; IODINE; NOISE; PERFORMANCE; RADIATION DOSES; READOUT SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Favazza, C, and Fetterly, K. SU-F-I-80: Correction for Bias in a Channelized Hotelling Model Observer Caused by Temporally Variable Non-Stationary Noise. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955908.
Favazza, C, & Fetterly, K. SU-F-I-80: Correction for Bias in a Channelized Hotelling Model Observer Caused by Temporally Variable Non-Stationary Noise. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955908.
Favazza, C, and Fetterly, K. Wed . "SU-F-I-80: Correction for Bias in a Channelized Hotelling Model Observer Caused by Temporally Variable Non-Stationary Noise". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955908.
@article{osti_22632140,
title = {SU-F-I-80: Correction for Bias in a Channelized Hotelling Model Observer Caused by Temporally Variable Non-Stationary Noise},
author = {Favazza, C and Fetterly, K},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Application of a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) over a wide range of x-ray angiography detector target dose (DTD) levels demonstrated substantial bias for conditions yielding low detectability indices (d’), including low DTD and small test objects. The purpose of this work was to develop theory and methods to correct this bias. Methods: A hypothesis was developed wherein the measured detectability index (d’b) for a known test object is positively biased by temporally variable non-stationary noise in the images. Hotelling’s T2 test statistic provided the foundation for a mathematical theory which accounts for independent contributions to the measured d’b value from both the test object (d’o) and non-stationary noise (d’ns). Experimental methods were developed to directly estimate d’o by determining d’ns and subtracting it from d’b, in accordance with the theory. Specifically, d’ns was determined from two sets of images from which the traditional test object was withheld. This method was applied to angiography images with DTD levels in the range 0 to 240 nGy and for disk-shaped iodine-based contrast targets with diameters 0.5 to 4.0 mm. Results: Bias in d’ was evidenced by d’b values which exceeded values expected from a quantum limited imaging system and decreasing object size and DTD. d’ns increased with decreasing DTD, reaching a maximum of 2.6 for DTD = 0. Bias-corrected d’o estimates demonstrated sub-quantum limited performance of the x-ray angiography for low DTD. Findings demonstrated that the source of non-stationary noise was detector electronic readout noise. Conclusion: Theory and methods to estimate and correct bias in CHO measurements from temporally variable non-stationary noise were presented. The temporal non-stationary noise was shown to be due to electronic readout noise. This method facilitates accurate estimates of d’ values over a large range of object size and detector target dose.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955908},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Imaging dopamine transporters using PET and SPECT probes is a powerful technique for the early diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders. In order to perform automated accurate diagnosis of these diseases, a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based model was developed and evaluated using the SPECT tracer [Tc-99m]TRODAT-1. Computer simulations were performed using a digitized striatal phantom to characterize early stages of the disease (20 lesion-present cases with varying lesion size and contrast). Projection data, modeling the effects of attenuation and geometric response function, were obtained for each case. Statistical noise levels corresponding to those observed clinically were added to the projection datamore » to obtain 100 noise realizations for each case. All the projection data were reconstructed, and a subset of the transaxial slices containing the striatum was summed and used for further analysis. CHO models, using the Laguerre-Gaussian functions as channels, were designed for two cases: (1) By training the model using individual lesion-present samples and (2) by training the model using pooled lesion-present samples. A decision threshold obtained for each CHO model was used to classify the study population (n=40). It was observed that individual lesion trained CHO models gave high diagnostic accuracy for lesions that were larger than those used to train the model and vice-versa. On the other hand, the pooled CHO model was found to give a high diagnostic accuracy for all the lesion cases (average diagnostic accuracy=0.95{+-}0.07; p<0.0001 Fisher's exact test). Based on our results, we conclude that a CHO model has the potential to provide early and accurate diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders, thereby improving patient management.« less
  • Purpose: To develop and apply an observer model to objectively evaluate and compare the performance of different angiographic imaging equipment and acquisition variables. Methods: Image Acquisition— Iodine-based phantoms were created with target diameters: 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 mm. The phantoms were imaged using both planes of a bi-plane angiography system with detector pixel dimensions 0.1542 mm{sup 2} and 0.1842 mm{sup 2}, respectively. All four phantoms were imaged with magnification factors 1.5, 1.25 and 1 and with the large and small focal spots. Phantom position and the dose per frame (0.12– 0.24 μ Gy/frame) were varied for a single phantommore » size, magnification and focal spot. Observer Model— For each experimental condition, 1200 signal-present and signal-absent images were acquired and a detectability index (d') was calculated with a Gabor-channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) model. Detectability indices were evaluated as a function of dose, phantom size, and magnification. The model was then applied to compare d' of the two imaging planes and focal spots. Uncertainty in d' was estimated by bootstrapping the data and by examining the shift-variance of systems. Results: Detectability indices varied linearly with magnification and the square root of dose. For the 2 and 4 mm phantoms, d' varied linearly with diameter. For the 0.5 and 1 mm phantoms, d' expectedly deviated from this linear relationship due to substantial detector and focal spot blurring of the phantoms. The small focal spot yielded up to 50% greater d' values than the large focal spot. For the two detectors, differences in d' did not exceed the estimated ∼7% error. Conclusions: The detectability indices predictably scaled with dose, diameter, magnification, and focal spot size and serve to validate the model. Results demonstrate statistically similar target detectability for both investigated detectors, despite differences in pixel dimensions. This CHO model provides a framework to evaluate angiographic system performance.« less
  • Purpose: Mathematical model observers provide a figure of merit that simultaneously considers a test object and the contrast, noise, and spatial resolution properties of an imaging system. The purpose of this work was to investigate the utility of a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) to assess system performance over a large range of angiographic exposure conditions. Methods: A 4 mm diameter disk shaped, iodine contrast test object was placed on a 20 cm thick Lucite phantom and 1204 image frames were acquired using fixed x-ray beam quality and for several detector target dose (DTD) values in the range 6 tomore » 240 nGy. The CHO was implemented in the spatial domain utilizing 96 Gabor functions as channels. Detectability index (DI) estimates were calculated using the “resubstitution” and “holdout” methods to train the CHO. Also, DI values calculated using discrete subsets of the data were used to estimate a minimally biased DI as might be expected from an infinitely large dataset. The relationship between DI, independently measured CNR, and changes in results expected assuming a quantum limited detector were assessed over the DTD range. Results: CNR measurements demonstrated that the angiography system is not quantum limited due to relatively increasing contamination from electronic noise that reduces CNR for low DTD. Direct comparison of DI versus CNR indicates that the CHO relatively overestimates DI for low DTD and/or underestimates DI values for high DTD. The relative magnitude of the apparent bias error in the DI values was ∼20% over the 40x DTD range investigated. Conclusion: For the angiography system investigated, the CHO can provide a minimally biased figure of merit if implemented over a restricted exposure range. However, bias leads to overestimates of DI for low exposures. This work emphasizes the need to verify CHO model performance during real-world application.« less
  • Purpose: Efficient optimization of CT protocols demands a quantitative approach to predicting human observer performance on specific tasks at various scan and reconstruction settings. The goal of this work was to investigate how well a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) can predict human observer performance on 2-alternative forced choice (2AFC) lesion-detection tasks at various dose levels and two different reconstruction algorithms: a filtered-backprojection (FBP) and an iterative reconstruction (IR) method. Methods: A 35 Multiplication-Sign 26 cm{sup 2} torso-shaped phantom filled with water was used to simulate an average-sized patient. Three rods with different diameters (small: 3 mm; medium: 5 mm; large:more » 9 mm) were placed in the center region of the phantom to simulate small, medium, and large lesions. The contrast relative to background was -15 HU at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times using automatic exposure control each at 60, 120, 240, 360, and 480 quality reference mAs on a 128-slice scanner. After removing the three rods, the water phantom was again scanned 100 times to provide signal-absent background images at the exact same locations. By extracting regions of interest around the three rods and on the signal-absent images, the authors generated 21 2AFC studies. Each 2AFC study had 100 trials, with each trial consisting of a signal-present image and a signal-absent image side-by-side in randomized order. In total, 2100 trials were presented to both the model and human observers. Four medical physicists acted as human observers. For the model observer, the authors used a CHO with Gabor channels, which involves six channel passbands, five orientations, and two phases, leading to a total of 60 channels. The performance predicted by the CHO was compared with that obtained by four medical physicists at each 2AFC study. Results: The human and model observers were highly correlated at each dose level for each lesion size for both FBP and IR. The Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients were 0.986 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.958-0.996] for FBP and 0.985 (95% CI: 0.863-0.998) for IR. Bland-Altman plots showed excellent agreement for all dose levels and lesions sizes with a mean absolute difference of 1.0%{+-} 1.1% for FBP and 2.1%{+-} 3.3% for IR. Conclusions: Human observer performance on a 2AFC lesion detection task in CT with a uniform background can be accurately predicted by a CHO model observer at different radiation dose levels and for both FBP and IR methods.« less
  • Purpose: To validate the use of a Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO) model for guiding image processing parameter selection and enable improved nodule detection in digital chest radiography. Methods: In a previous study, an anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged with and without PMMA simulated nodules using a GE Discovery XR656 digital radiography system. The impact of image processing parameters was then explored using a CHO with 10 Laguerre-Gauss channels. In this work, we validate the CHO’s trend in nodule detectability as a function of two processing parameters by conducting a signal-known-exactly, multi-reader-multi-case (MRMC) ROC observer study. Five naive readers scored confidencemore » of nodule visualization in 384 images with 50% nodule prevalence. The image backgrounds were regions-of-interest extracted from 6 normal patient scans, and the digitally inserted simulated nodules were obtained from phantom data in previous work. Each patient image was processed with both a near-optimal and a worst-case parameter combination, as determined by the CHO for nodule detection. The same 192 ROIs were used for each image processing method, with 32 randomly selected lung ROIs per patient image. Finally, the MRMC data was analyzed using the freely available iMRMC software of Gallas et al. Results: The image processing parameters which were optimized for the CHO led to a statistically significant improvement (p=0.049) in human observer AUC from 0.78 to 0.86, relative to the image processing implementation which produced the lowest CHO performance. Conclusion: Differences in user-selectable image processing methods on a commercially available digital radiography system were shown to have a marked impact on performance of human observers in the task of lung nodule detection. Further, the effect of processing on humans was similar to the effect on CHO performance. Future work will expand this study to include a wider range of detection/classification tasks and more observers, including experienced chest radiologists.« less