skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-F-I-77: Radiation Dose in Cardiac Catheterization Procedures: Impact of a Systematic Reduction in Pulsed Fluoroscopy Frame Rate

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate whether one small systematic reduction in fluoroscopy frame rate has a significant effect on the total air kerma and/or dose area product for diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterization procedures. Methods: The default fluoroscopy frame rate (FFR) was lowered from 15 to 10 fps in 5 Siemens™ Axiom Artis cardiac catheterization labs (CCL) on July 1, 2013. A total of 7212 consecutive diagnostic and interventional CCL procedures were divided into two study groups: 3602 procedures from 10/1/12 –6/30/13 with FFR of 15 fps; and 3610 procedures 7/1/13 – 3/31/14 at 10 fps. For each procedure, total air kerma (TAK), fluoroscopy skin dose (FSD), total/fluoroscopy dose area products (TAD, FAD), and total fluoroscopy time (FT) were recorded. Patient specific data collected for each procedure included: BSA, sex, height, weight, interventional versus diagnostic; and elective versus emergent. Results: For pre to post change in FFR, each categorical variable was compared using Pearson’s Chi-square test, Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. No statistically significant difference in BSA, height, weight, number of interventional versus diagnostic, elective versus emergent procedures was found between the two study groups. Decreasing the default FFR from 15 fps to 10 fps in the two study groups significantlymore » reduced TAK from 1305 to 1061 mGy (p<0.0001), FSD from 627 to 454 mGy (p<0.0001), TAD from 8681 to 6991 uGy × m{sup 2}(p<0.0001), and FAD from 4493 to 3297 uGy × m{sup 2}(p<0.0001). No statistically significant difference in FT was noted. Clinical image quality was not analyzed, and reports of noticeable effects were minimal. From July 1, 2013 to date, the default FFR has remained 10 fps. Conclusion: Reducing the FFR from 15 to 10 fps significantly reduced total air kerma and dose area product which may decrease risk for potential radiation-induced skin injuries and improve patient outcomes.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22632137
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; FLUOROSCOPY; IMAGES; KERMA; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION HAZARDS; RADIATION INJURIES; SKIN

Citation Formats

Schultz, C, and Dixon, S. SU-F-I-77: Radiation Dose in Cardiac Catheterization Procedures: Impact of a Systematic Reduction in Pulsed Fluoroscopy Frame Rate. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955905.
Schultz, C, & Dixon, S. SU-F-I-77: Radiation Dose in Cardiac Catheterization Procedures: Impact of a Systematic Reduction in Pulsed Fluoroscopy Frame Rate. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955905.
Schultz, C, and Dixon, S. 2016. "SU-F-I-77: Radiation Dose in Cardiac Catheterization Procedures: Impact of a Systematic Reduction in Pulsed Fluoroscopy Frame Rate". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955905.
@article{osti_22632137,
title = {SU-F-I-77: Radiation Dose in Cardiac Catheterization Procedures: Impact of a Systematic Reduction in Pulsed Fluoroscopy Frame Rate},
author = {Schultz, C and Dixon, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate whether one small systematic reduction in fluoroscopy frame rate has a significant effect on the total air kerma and/or dose area product for diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterization procedures. Methods: The default fluoroscopy frame rate (FFR) was lowered from 15 to 10 fps in 5 Siemens™ Axiom Artis cardiac catheterization labs (CCL) on July 1, 2013. A total of 7212 consecutive diagnostic and interventional CCL procedures were divided into two study groups: 3602 procedures from 10/1/12 –6/30/13 with FFR of 15 fps; and 3610 procedures 7/1/13 – 3/31/14 at 10 fps. For each procedure, total air kerma (TAK), fluoroscopy skin dose (FSD), total/fluoroscopy dose area products (TAD, FAD), and total fluoroscopy time (FT) were recorded. Patient specific data collected for each procedure included: BSA, sex, height, weight, interventional versus diagnostic; and elective versus emergent. Results: For pre to post change in FFR, each categorical variable was compared using Pearson’s Chi-square test, Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. No statistically significant difference in BSA, height, weight, number of interventional versus diagnostic, elective versus emergent procedures was found between the two study groups. Decreasing the default FFR from 15 fps to 10 fps in the two study groups significantly reduced TAK from 1305 to 1061 mGy (p<0.0001), FSD from 627 to 454 mGy (p<0.0001), TAD from 8681 to 6991 uGy × m{sup 2}(p<0.0001), and FAD from 4493 to 3297 uGy × m{sup 2}(p<0.0001). No statistically significant difference in FT was noted. Clinical image quality was not analyzed, and reports of noticeable effects were minimal. From July 1, 2013 to date, the default FFR has remained 10 fps. Conclusion: Reducing the FFR from 15 to 10 fps significantly reduced total air kerma and dose area product which may decrease risk for potential radiation-induced skin injuries and improve patient outcomes.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955905},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • The increased application of therapeutic interventional cardiology procedures is associated with increased radiation exposure to physicians, patients and technical personnel. New advances in imaging techniques have the potential for reducing radiation exposure. A progressive scanning video system with a standard vascular phantom has been shown to decrease entrance radiation exposure. The effect of this system on reducing actual radiation exposure to physicians and technicians was assessed from 1984 through 1987. During this time, progressive fluoroscopy was added sequentially to all four adult catheterization laboratories; no changes in shielding procedures were made. During this time, the case load per physician increasedmore » by 63% and the number of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty procedures (a high radiation procedure) increased by 244%. Despite these increases in both case load and higher radiation procedures, the average radiation exposure per physician declined by 37%. During the same time, the radiation exposure for technicians decreased by 35%. Pulsed progressive fluoroscopy is effective for reducing radiation exposure to catheterization laboratory physicians and technical staff.« less
  • Purpose: Timely identification of systematic changes in radiation delivery of an imaging system can lead to a reduction in risk for the patients involved. However, existing quality assurance programs involving the routine testing of equipment performance using phantoms are limited in their ability to effectively carry out this task. To address this issue, the authors propose the implementation of an ongoing monitoring process that utilizes procedural data to identify unexpected large or small radiation exposures for individual patients, as well as to detect persistent changes in the radiation output of imaging platforms. Methods: Data used in this study were obtainedmore » from records routinely collected during procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization imaging facility at St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, over the period January 2008-March 2010. A two stage monitoring process employing individual and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts was developed and used to identify unexpectedly high or low radiation exposure levels for individual patients, as well as detect persistent changes in the radiation output delivered by the imaging systems. To increase sensitivity of the charts, we account for variation in dose area product (DAP) values due to other measured factors (patient weight, fluoroscopy time, and digital acquisition frame count) using multiple linear regression. Control charts are then constructed using the residual values from this linear regression. The proposed monitoring process was evaluated using simulation to model the performance of the process under known conditions. Results: Retrospective application of this technique to actual clinical data identified a number of cases in which the DAP result could be considered unexpected. Most of these, upon review, were attributed to data entry errors. The charts monitoring the overall system radiation output trends demonstrated changes in equipment performance associated with relocation of the equipment to a new department. When tested under simulated conditions, the EWMA chart was capable of detecting a sustained 15% increase in average radiation output within 60 cases (<1 month of operation), while a 33% increase would be signaled within 20 cases. Conclusions: This technique offers a valuable enhancement to existing quality assurance programs in radiology that rely upon the testing of equipment radiation output at discrete time frames to ensure performance security.« less
  • The increasing number of cardiac interventional procedures has resulted in a tremendous increase in the absorbed x-ray dose by radiologists as well as patients. A new method is presented for x-ray dose reduction which utilizes adaptive tube pulse-rate scheduling in pulsed fluoroscopic systems. In the proposed system, pulse-rate scheduling depends on the heart muscle activity phase determined through continuous guided segmentation of the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG). Displaying images generated at the proposed adaptive nonuniform rate is visually unacceptable; therefore, a frame-filling approach is devised to ensure a 30 frame/sec display rate. The authors adopted two approaches for the frame-filling portionmore » of the system depending on the imaging mode used in the procedure. During cine-mode imaging (high x-ray dose), collected image frame-to-frame pixel motion is estimated using a pel-recursive algorithm followed by motion-based pixel interpolation to estimate the frames necessary to increase the rate to 30 frames/sec. The other frame-filling approach is adopted during fluoro-mode imaging (low x-ray dose), characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio images. This approach consists of simply holding the last collected frame for as many frames as necessary to maintain the real-time display rate.« less
  • Purpose: To improve the quality of low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic images using statistics-based restoration algorithm so that the patient fluoroscopy can be performed with reduced radiation dose. Method and Materials: Noise in the low-dose fluoroscopy was suppressed by temporal and spatial filtering. The temporal correlation among neighboring frames was considered by the Karhunen-Loeve (KL) transform (i.e., principal component analysis). After the KL transform, the selected neighboring frames of fluoroscopy were decomposed to uncorrelated and ordered principal components. For each KL component, a penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) objective function was constructed to restore the ideal image. The penalty was chosen as anisotropicmore » quadratic, and the penalty parameter in each KL component was inversely proportional to its corresponding eigenvalue. Smaller KL eigenvalue is associated with the KL component of lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and a larger penalty parameter should be used for such KL component. The low-dose fluoroscopic images were acquired using a Varian Acuity simulator. A quality assurance phantom and an anthropomorphic chest phantom were used to evaluate the presented algorithm. Results: In the images restored by the proposed KL domain PWLS algorithm, noise is greatly suppressed, whereas fine structures are well preserved. Average improvement rate of SNR is 75% among selected regions of interest. Comparison studies with traditional techniques, such as the mean and median filters, show that the proposed algorithm is advantageous in terms of structure preservation. Conclusions: The proposed noise reduction algorithm can significantly improve the quality of low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic image and allows for dose reduction in X-ray fluoroscopy.« less
  • Background and PurposeIn CT fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI), the majority of radiation dose is contributed by the planning CT scan rather than the CTF procedure itself. We replaced the planning helical CT with a spot CTF and accordingly changed the patient posture during scout and planning scans. The aim of this study was to test whether radiation dose reduction would be achieved by this protocol modification while still maintaining technical performance.MethodsOverall, 338 consecutive procedures before (control group: n = 163) and after (study group: n = 175) instituting the above-mentioned protocol modification were analyzed retrospectively, comparing patient characteristics (age, sex,more » neck diameter, and level injected) and technical performance [technical success rate, dose-length product (DLP), inadvertent contrast flow incidence, number of CTF acquisitions, and procedural time] between the two groups.ResultsAll injections were technically successful at every level from C3–C4 to C7–T1 without serious complications in both groups. The median DLP of the study group (7.92 mGy·cm) was significantly reduced compared to that of the control group (39.05 mGy·cm, P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the incidence of inadvertent contrast flow (20.6 vs. 17.2 %, P = 0.426), number of CTF acquisitions (median 5 vs. 4, P = 0.123), and the procedural time (median 6.62 vs. 6.90 min, P = 0.100).ConclusionsWhen conducting CTF-guided cervical TFESIs, a significant radiation dose reduction (median 79.7 % in DLP) can be achieved by modifying scout and planning steps, without compromising the technical performance.« less