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Title: SU-F-I-73: Surface Dose from KV Diagnostic Beams From An On-Board Imager On a Linac Machine Using Different Imaging Techniques and Filters

Abstract

Purpose: To quantitatively investigate the surface dose deposited in patients imaged with a kV on-board-imager mounted on a radiotherapy machine using different clinical imaging techniques and filters. Methods: A high sensitivity photon diode is used to measure the surface dose on central-axis and at an off-axis-point which is mounted on the top of a phantom setup. The dose is measured for different imaging techniques that include: AP-Pelvis, AP-Head, AP-Abdomen, AP-Thorax, and Extremity. The dose measurements from these imaging techniques are combined with various filtering techniques that include: no-filter (open-field), half-fan bowtie (HF), full-fan bowtie (FF) and Cu-plate filters. The relative surface dose for different imaging and filtering techniques is evaluated quantiatively by the ratio of the dose relative to the Cu-plate filter. Results: The lowest surface dose is deposited with the Cu-plate filter. The highest surface dose deposited results from open fields without filter and it is nearly a factor of 8–30 larger than the corresponding imaging technique with the Cu-plate filter. The AP-Abdomen technique delivers the largest surface dose that is nearly 2.7 times larger than the AP-Head technique. The smallest surface dose is obtained from the Extremity imaging technique. Imaging with bowtie filters decreases the surface dose bymore » nearly 33% in comparison with the open field. The surface doses deposited with the HF or FF-bowtie filters are within few percentages. Image-quality of the radiographic images obtained from the different filtering techniques is similar because the Cu-plate eliminates low-energy photons. The HF- and FF-bowtie filters generate intensity-gradients in the radiographs which affects image-quality in the different imaging technique. Conclusion: Surface dose from kV-imaging decreases significantly with the Cu-plate and bowtie-filters compared to imaging without filters using open-field beams. The use of Cu-plate filter does not affect image-quality and may be used as the default in the different imaging techniques.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22632134
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ABDOMEN; BEAMS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CHEST; IMAGES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; PATIENTS; PELVIS; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SENSITIVITY

Citation Formats

Ali, I, Hossain, S, Syzek, E, and Ahmad, S. SU-F-I-73: Surface Dose from KV Diagnostic Beams From An On-Board Imager On a Linac Machine Using Different Imaging Techniques and Filters. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955901.
Ali, I, Hossain, S, Syzek, E, & Ahmad, S. SU-F-I-73: Surface Dose from KV Diagnostic Beams From An On-Board Imager On a Linac Machine Using Different Imaging Techniques and Filters. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955901.
Ali, I, Hossain, S, Syzek, E, and Ahmad, S. Wed . "SU-F-I-73: Surface Dose from KV Diagnostic Beams From An On-Board Imager On a Linac Machine Using Different Imaging Techniques and Filters". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955901.
@article{osti_22632134,
title = {SU-F-I-73: Surface Dose from KV Diagnostic Beams From An On-Board Imager On a Linac Machine Using Different Imaging Techniques and Filters},
author = {Ali, I and Hossain, S and Syzek, E and Ahmad, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To quantitatively investigate the surface dose deposited in patients imaged with a kV on-board-imager mounted on a radiotherapy machine using different clinical imaging techniques and filters. Methods: A high sensitivity photon diode is used to measure the surface dose on central-axis and at an off-axis-point which is mounted on the top of a phantom setup. The dose is measured for different imaging techniques that include: AP-Pelvis, AP-Head, AP-Abdomen, AP-Thorax, and Extremity. The dose measurements from these imaging techniques are combined with various filtering techniques that include: no-filter (open-field), half-fan bowtie (HF), full-fan bowtie (FF) and Cu-plate filters. The relative surface dose for different imaging and filtering techniques is evaluated quantiatively by the ratio of the dose relative to the Cu-plate filter. Results: The lowest surface dose is deposited with the Cu-plate filter. The highest surface dose deposited results from open fields without filter and it is nearly a factor of 8–30 larger than the corresponding imaging technique with the Cu-plate filter. The AP-Abdomen technique delivers the largest surface dose that is nearly 2.7 times larger than the AP-Head technique. The smallest surface dose is obtained from the Extremity imaging technique. Imaging with bowtie filters decreases the surface dose by nearly 33% in comparison with the open field. The surface doses deposited with the HF or FF-bowtie filters are within few percentages. Image-quality of the radiographic images obtained from the different filtering techniques is similar because the Cu-plate eliminates low-energy photons. The HF- and FF-bowtie filters generate intensity-gradients in the radiographs which affects image-quality in the different imaging technique. Conclusion: Surface dose from kV-imaging decreases significantly with the Cu-plate and bowtie-filters compared to imaging without filters using open-field beams. The use of Cu-plate filter does not affect image-quality and may be used as the default in the different imaging techniques.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955901},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To develop accurate three-dimensional (3D) empirical dose calculation model for kV diagnostic beams for different radiographic and CT imaging techniques. Methods: Dose was modeled using photon attenuation measured using depth dose (DD), scatter radiation of the source and medium, and off-axis ratio (OAR) profiles. Measurements were performed using single-diode in water and a diode-array detector (MapCHECK2) with kV on-board imagers (OBI) integrated with Varian TrueBeam and Trilogy linacs. The dose parameters were measured for three energies: 80, 100, and 125 kVp with and without bowtie filters using field sizes 1×1–40×40 cm2 and depths 0–20 cm in water tank. Results:more » The measured DD decreased with depth in water because of photon attenuation, while it increased with field size due to increased scatter radiation from medium. DD curves varied with energy and filters where they increased with higher energies and beam hardening from half-fan and full-fan bowtie filters. Scatter radiation factors increased with field sizes and higher energies. The OAR was with 3% for beam profiles within the flat dose regions. The heal effect of this kV OBI system was within 6% from the central axis value at different depths. The presence of bowtie filters attenuated measured dose off-axis by as much as 80% at the edges of large beams. The model dose predictions were verified with measured doses using single point diode and ionization chamber or two-dimensional diode-array detectors inserted in solid water phantoms. Conclusion: This empirical model enables fast and accurate 3D dose calculation in water within 5% in regions with near charge-particle equilibrium conditions outside buildup region and penumbra. It considers accurately scatter radiation contribution in water which is superior to air-kerma or CTDI dose measurements used usually in dose calculation for diagnostic imaging beams. Considering heterogeneity corrections in this model will enable patient specific dose calculation.« less
  • Purpose: Although cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging became popular in radiation oncology, its imaging dose estimation is still challenging. The goal of this study is to assess the kilovoltage CBCT doses using GMctdospp - an EGSnrc based Monte Carlo (MC) framework. Methods: Two Varian OBI x-ray tube models were implemented in the GMctpdospp framework of EGSnrc MC System. The x-ray spectrum of 125 kVp CBCT beam was acquired from an EGSnrc/BEAMnrc simulation and validated with IPEM report 78. Then, the spectrum was utilized as an input spectrum in GMctdospp dose calculations. Both full and half bowtie pre-filters of the OBI systemmore » were created by using egs-prism module. The x-ray tube MC models were verified by comparing calculated dosimetric profiles (lateral and depth) to ion chamber measurements for a static x-ray beam irradiation to a cuboid water phantom. An abdominal CBCT imaging doses was simulated in GMctdospp framework using a 5-year-old anthropomorphic phantom. The organ doses and effective dose (ED) from the framework were assessed and compared to the MOSFET measurements and convolution/superposition dose calculations. Results: The lateral and depth dose profiles in the water cuboid phantom were well matched within 6% except a few areas - left shoulder of the half bowtie lateral profile and surface of water phantom. The organ doses and ED from the MC framework were found to be closer to MOSFET measurements and CS calculations within 2 cGy and 5 mSv respectively. Conclusion: This study implemented and validated the Varian OBI x-ray tube models in the GMctdospp MC framework using a cuboid water phantom and CBCT imaging doses were also evaluated in a 5-year-old anthropomorphic phantom. In future study, various CBCT imaging protocols will be implemented and validated and consequently patient CT images will be used to estimate the CBCT imaging doses in patients.« less
  • Purpose: To measure actual patient eye lens dose for different cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition protocol of Varian’s On Board Imagining (OBI) system using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimeter and study the eye lens dose with patient geometry and distance of isocenter to the eye lens Methods: OSL dosimeter was used to measure eye lens dose of patient. OSL dosimeter was placed on patient forehead center during CBCT image acquisition to measure eye lens dose. For three different cone beam acquisition protocol (standard dose head, low dose head and high quality head) of Varian On-Board Imaging, eye lens dosesmore » were measured. Measured doses were correlated with patient geometry and distance between isocenter to eye lens. Results: Measured eye lens dose for standard dose head was in the range of 1.8 mGy to 3.2 mGy, for high quality head protocol dose was in range of 4.5mGy to 9.9 mGy whereas for low dose head was in the range of 0.3mGy to 0.7mGy. Dose to eye lens is depends upon position of isocenter. For posterioraly located tumor eye lens dose is less. Conclusion: From measured doses it can be concluded that by proper selection of imagining protocol and frequency of imaging, it is possible to restrict the eye lens dose below the new limit set by ICRP. However, undoubted advantages of imaging system should be counter balanced by careful consideration of imaging protocol especially for very intense imaging sequences for Adoptive Radiotherapy or IMRT.« less
  • Purpose: Varian TrueBeam version 2.0 comes with a new inline 2.5MV beam modality for image guided patient setup. In this work we develop an iterative volumetric image reconstruction technique specific to the beam and investigate the possibility of obtaining metal artifact free CBCT images using the new imaging modality. Methods: An iterative reconstruction algorithm with a sparse representation constraint based on dictionary learning is developed, in which both sparse projection and low dose rate (10 MU/min) are considered. Two CBCT experiments were conducted using the newly available 2.5MV beam on a Varian TrueBeam linac. First, a Rando anthropomorphic head phantommore » with and without a copper bar inserted in the center was scanned using both 2.5MV and kV (100kVp) beams. In a second experiment, an MRI phantom with many coils was scanned using 2.5MV, 6MV, and kV (100kVp) beams. Imaging dose and the resultant image quality is studied. Results: Qualitative assessment suggests that there were no visually detectable metal artifacts in MV CBCT images, compared with significant metal artifacts in kV CBCT images, especially in the MRI phantom. For a region near the metal object in the head phantom, the 2.5MV CBCT gave a more accurate quantification of the electron density compared with kV CBCT, with a ∼50% reduction in mean HU error. As expected, the contrast between bone and soft-tissue in 2.5MV CBCT decreased compared with kV CBCT. Conclusion: On-board CBCT imaging with the new 2.5MV beam can effectively reduce metal artifacts, although with a reduced softtissue contrast. Combination of kV and MV scanning may lead to metal artifact free CBCT images with uncompromised soft-tissue contrast.« less
  • Purpose: Novel linac machines, TrueBeam (TB) and Elekta Versa have updated head designing and software control system, include flattening-filter-free (FFF) photon and electron beams. Later on FFF beams were also introduced on C-Series machines. In this work FFF beams for same energy 6MV but from different machine versions were studied with reference to beam data parameters. Methods: The 6MV-FFF percent depth doses, profile symmetry and flatness, dose rate tables, and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) transmission factors were measured during commissioning process of both C-series and Truebeam machines. The scanning and dosimetric data for 6MV-FFF beam from Truebeam and C-Series linacs wasmore » compared. A correlation of 6MV-FFF beam from Elekta Versa with that of Varian linacs was also found. Results: The scanning files were plotted for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. The dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) for C-Series 6MV-FFF beam is 1.1 mm. Published values for Truebeam dosimetric leaf gap is 1.16 mm. 6MV MLC transmission factor varies between 1.3 % and 1.4 % in two separate measurements and measured DLG values vary between 1.32 mm and 1.33 mm on C-Series machine. MLC transmission factor from C-Series machine varies between 1.5 % and 1.6 %. Some of the measured data values from C-Series FFF beam are compared with Truebeam representative data. 6MV-FFF beam parameter values like dmax, OP factors, beam symmetry and flatness and additional parameters for C-Series and Truebeam liancs will be presented and compared in graphical form and tabular data form if selected. Conclusion: The 6MV flattening filter (FF) beam data from C-Series & Truebeam and 6MV-FFF beam data from Truebeam has already presented. This particular analysis to compare 6MV-FFF beam from C-Series and Truebeam provides opportunity to better elaborate FFF mode on novel machines. It was found that C-Series and Truebeam 6MV-FFF dosimetric and beam data was quite similar.« less