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Title: SU-F-I-53: Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging of the Breast: A Monte Carlo Evaluation of Absorbed Dose

Abstract

Purpose: Coherent scatter based imaging has shown improved contrast and molecular specificity over conventional digital mammography however the biological risks have not been quantified due to a lack of accurate information on absorbed dose. This study intends to characterize the dose distribution and average glandular dose from coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging of the breast. The dose deposited in the breast from this new diagnostic imaging modality has not yet been quantitatively evaluated. Here, various digitized anthropomorphic phantoms are tested in a Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the absorbed dose distribution and average glandular dose using clinically feasible scan protocols. Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation software is used to replicate the coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging system. Energy sensitive, photon counting detectors are used to characterize the x-ray beam spectra for various imaging protocols. This input spectra is cross-validated with the results from XSPECT, a commercially available application that yields x-ray tube specific spectra for the operating parameters employed. XSPECT is also used to determine the appropriate number of photons emitted per mAs of tube current at a given kVp tube potential. With the implementation of the XCAT digital anthropomorphic breast phantom library, a variety ofmore » breast sizes with differing anatomical structure are evaluated. Simulations were performed with and without compression of the breast for dose comparison. Results: Through the Monte Carlo evaluation of a diverse population of breast types imaged under real-world scan conditions, a clinically relevant average glandular dose for this new imaging modality is extrapolated. Conclusion: With access to the physical coherent scatter imaging system used in the simulation, the results of this Monte Carlo study may be used to directly influence the future development of the modality to keep breast dose to a minimum while still maintaining clinically viable image quality.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Durham, NC (United States)
  2. Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)
  3. Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22626808
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ABSORBED RADIATION DOSES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; IMAGES; MAMMARY GLANDS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; SPECIFICITY; X-RAY TUBES; PHOTON COUNTING

Citation Formats

Morris, R, Lakshmanan, M, Fong, G, Kapadia, A, and Greenberg, J. SU-F-I-53: Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging of the Breast: A Monte Carlo Evaluation of Absorbed Dose. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955881.
Morris, R, Lakshmanan, M, Fong, G, Kapadia, A, & Greenberg, J. SU-F-I-53: Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging of the Breast: A Monte Carlo Evaluation of Absorbed Dose. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955881.
Morris, R, Lakshmanan, M, Fong, G, Kapadia, A, and Greenberg, J. 2016. "SU-F-I-53: Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging of the Breast: A Monte Carlo Evaluation of Absorbed Dose". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955881.
@article{osti_22626808,
title = {SU-F-I-53: Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging of the Breast: A Monte Carlo Evaluation of Absorbed Dose},
author = {Morris, R and Lakshmanan, M and Fong, G and Kapadia, A and Greenberg, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Coherent scatter based imaging has shown improved contrast and molecular specificity over conventional digital mammography however the biological risks have not been quantified due to a lack of accurate information on absorbed dose. This study intends to characterize the dose distribution and average glandular dose from coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging of the breast. The dose deposited in the breast from this new diagnostic imaging modality has not yet been quantitatively evaluated. Here, various digitized anthropomorphic phantoms are tested in a Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the absorbed dose distribution and average glandular dose using clinically feasible scan protocols. Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation software is used to replicate the coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging system. Energy sensitive, photon counting detectors are used to characterize the x-ray beam spectra for various imaging protocols. This input spectra is cross-validated with the results from XSPECT, a commercially available application that yields x-ray tube specific spectra for the operating parameters employed. XSPECT is also used to determine the appropriate number of photons emitted per mAs of tube current at a given kVp tube potential. With the implementation of the XCAT digital anthropomorphic breast phantom library, a variety of breast sizes with differing anatomical structure are evaluated. Simulations were performed with and without compression of the breast for dose comparison. Results: Through the Monte Carlo evaluation of a diverse population of breast types imaged under real-world scan conditions, a clinically relevant average glandular dose for this new imaging modality is extrapolated. Conclusion: With access to the physical coherent scatter imaging system used in the simulation, the results of this Monte Carlo study may be used to directly influence the future development of the modality to keep breast dose to a minimum while still maintaining clinically viable image quality.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955881},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: This study intends to characterize the spectral and spatial resolution limits of various fan beam geometries for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast structures via coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging techniques. In previous studies, pencil beam raster scanning methods using coherent scatter computed tomography and selected volume tomography have yielded excellent results for tumor discrimination. However, these methods don’t readily conform to clinical constraints; primarily prolonged scan times and excessive dose to the patient. Here, we refine a fan beam coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system to characterize the tradeoffs between dose, scan time and image quality formore » breast tumor discrimination. Methods: An X-ray tube (125kVp, 400mAs) illuminated the sample with collimated fan beams of varying widths (3mm to 25mm). Scatter data was collected via two linear-array energy-sensitive detectors oriented parallel and perpendicular to the beam plane. An iterative reconstruction algorithm yields images of the sample’s spatial distribution and respective spectral data for each location. To model in-vivo tumor analysis, surgically resected breast tumor samples were used in conjunction with lard, which has a form factor comparable to adipose (fat). Results: Quantitative analysis with current setup geometry indicated optimal performance for beams up to 10mm wide, with wider beams producing poorer spatial resolution. Scan time for a fixed volume was reduced by a factor of 6 when scanned with a 10mm fan beam compared to a 1.5mm pencil beam. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the utility of fan beam coherent scatter spectral imaging for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast tissues has successfully reduced dose and scan times whilst sufficiently preserving spectral and spatial resolution. Future work to alter the coded aperture and detector geometries could potentially allow the use of even wider fans, thereby making coded aperture coherent scatter imaging a clinically viable method for breast cancer detection. United States Department of Homeland Security; Duke University Medical Center - Department of Radiology; Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories; Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the spatial distribution of x-ray scatter and scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) in projections during cone-beam breast CT (CBBCT) with laterally-shifted detector that results in coronal (fan-angle) truncation. Methods: We hypothesized that CBBCT with coronal truncation would lower SPR due to reduction in irradiated breast volume, and that the location of maximum x-ray scatter fluence (scatter-peak) in the detector plane can be determined from the ratio of irradiated-to-total breast volume, breast dimensions and system geometry. Monte Carlo simulations (GEANT4) reflecting a prototype CBBCT system were used to record the position-dependent primary and scatter x-ray photon fluence incident on themore » detector without coronal truncation (full fan-angle, 2f=24-degrees) and with coronal truncation (fan-angle, f+ f=12+2.7-degrees). Semi-ellipsoidal breasts (10/14/18-cm diameter, chest-wall to nipple length: 0.75xdiameter, 2%/14%/100% fibroglandular content) aligned with the axis-of-rotation (AOR) were modeled. Mono-energy photons were simulated and weighted for 2 spectra (49kVp, 1.4-mm Al HVL; 60kVp, 3.76-mm Al HVL). In addition to SPR, the scatter maps were analyzed to identify the location of the scatter-peak. Results: For CBBCT without fan-angle truncation, the scatter-peaks were aligned with the projection of the AOR onto the detector for all breasts. With truncated fan-beam, the scatter-peaks were laterally-shifted from the projection of the AOR along the fan-angle direction by 14/38/70-pixels for 10/14/18-cm diameter breasts. The corresponding theoretical shifts were 14.8/39.7/68-pixels (p=0.47, 2-tailed paired-ratio t-test). Along the cone-angle, the shift in scatter-peaks between truncated and full-fan angle CBBCT were 2/2/4 -pixels for 10/14/18-cm diameter breasts. CBBCT with fan-angle truncation reduced SPR by 14/22/28% for 10/14/18-cm diameter breasts. 60kVp reduced SPR by 21–25% compared to 49kVp. Peak SPR for CBBCT with fan-angle truncation (60kVp) were 0.09/0.25/0.73 for 10/14/18-cm diameter breasts. Conclusion: CBBCT with laterally-shifted detector geometry and with appropriate kVp/beam quality reduces SPR. If residual scatter needs correction, the location corresponding to scatter-peak can be analytically computed. This work was supported in part by NIH R01 CA128906. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or NCI.« less
  • This paper reports on a new NDT imaging technique based on the measurement of Compton-scattered photons developed which features the use of wide aperture detectors. With this new technique, the inspection speed can be improved because the scanning activities can be reduced by one degree of freedom. Furthermore, the employment of wide aperture detectors serves to simplify the design of measurement systems and the data collection time at each step in the scanning process can be reduced due to the removal of the usual efficiency-reducing focusing collimator. To study the imaging process of the novel NDT system, a number ofmore » Monte Carlo calculations have been performed. In particular, a feasibility study of applying this technique to the pipe wall thinning problem has been conducted. The tools that have been developed for this research and the resulting concept of a new nondestructive inspection system will be presented.« less
  • Purpose: The current standard TG-43 dose calculation method for SAVI-based Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) assumes an ideal geometry of infinite homogeneous water. However, in SAVI treatments, the air cavity inside the device and the short source-to-skin distance raise concerns about the dose accuracy of the TG-43 method. This study is to evaluate TG-43 dose calculation accuracy in SAVI treatments using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: We recalculated the dose distributions of 15 APBI patients treated with SAVI devices, including five cases with a size of 6–1, five with 8−1 and five with 10−1, using our in-house developed fast MCmore » dose package for HDR brachytherapy (gBMC). A phase-space file was used to model the Ir-192 HDR source. For each case, the patient CT was converted into a voxelized phantom and the dwell positions and times were extracted from treatment plans for MC dose calculations. Clinically relevant dosimetric parameters of the recalculated dose were compared to those computed via the TG-43 approach. Results: A systematic overestimation of doses was found for the 15 cases in TG-43 results, with D90, V150, and V200 for PTV-eval 2.8±1.8%, 2.0±2.2%, and 1.8±3.5% higher than MC results. TG-43 also overestimated the dose to skin with the maximum dose 4.4±8.4% higher on average. The relatively large standard deviation seen in the difference of maximum skin dose is partially ascribed to the statistical uncertainty of MC simulations when computing the maximum dose. It took gBMC ∼1 minute to compute dose for a SAVI plan. Conclusion: The high efficiency of our gBMC package facilitated the studies with a relatively large number of cases. An overestimation of TG-43 doses was found when using this MC package to recompute doses in SAVI cases. Clinical utilization of TG-43 dose calculation method in this scenario should be aware of this fact.« less
  • Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector'smore » high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A{sup 109}Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm{sup 2}) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy resolution measured with the 22 keV photons from a {sup 109}Cd source was less than 9%. A reduction of image noise was shown in all the spatial frequencies in 1D NPS as a result of the elimination of the electronic noise. The spatial resolution was measured just above 5 line pairs per mm (lp/mm) where 10% of MTF corresponded to 5.4 mm{sup −1}. The 2D NPS and NEQ shows a low noise floor and a linear dependence on dose. The reconstruction filter choice affected both of the MTF and NPS results, but had a weak effect on the NEQ. Conclusions: The prototype energy resolved photon counting Si strip detector can offer superior imaging performance for dedicated breast CT as compared to a conventional energy-integrating detector due to its high output count rate, high spatial and energy resolution, and low noise characteristics, which are essential characteristics for spectral breast CT imaging.« less