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Title: SU-F-I-02: Comparative Analysis and Constancy Check of Image Quality Parameters for Three Linear Accelerators Per TG 142 Protocol

Abstract

Purpose: To compare image quality parameters and assessing the image stability of three different linear accelerators (linac) for 2D and 3D imaging modalities: planar kV, MV images and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Methods: QCkV1, QC-3 and Cathpan-600 phantoms were utilized to acquire kV, MV and CBCT images respectively on monthly basis per TG142 QA protocol for over 2 years on 21Ex, NovalisTx and TrueBeam linacs. DICOM images were analyzed with the help of QA analysis software: PIPsPro from Standard Imaging. For planar kV and MV images, planar spatial resolution, contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise; for CBCT, HU values were collected and analyzed. Results: Two years of monthly QA measurements were analyzed for the planar and CBCT images. Values were normalized to the mean and the standard deviations (STD) are presented. For the kV planar radiographic images the STD of spatial resolution for f30, f40, f50, CNR and noise for 21Ex are 0.006, 0.011, 0.013, 0.046, 0.026; Novalis-Tx are 0.009, 0.016, 0.016, 0.067, 0.053 ; TrueBeam are 0.007, 0.005, 0.009, 0.017, 0.016 respectively. For the MV planar radiographic images, the STD of spatial resolution for f30, f40, f50, CNR and noise for 21Ex are 0.009, 0.010, 0.008, 0.023, 0.023; formore » Novalix-Tx are 0.012, 0.010, 0.008, 0.029, 0.023 and for TrueBeam are 0.010, 0.010, 0.007, 0.022, 0.022 respectively. For the CBCT images, HU constancies of Air, Polystyrene, Teflon, PMP, LDPE and Delrin for 21Ex are 0.014, 0.070, 0.031, 0.053, 0.076, 0.087; for Novalis Tx are 0.019, 0.047, 0.035, 0.059, 0.077, 0.087 and for TrueBeam are 0.011, 0.044, 0.025, 0.044, 0.056, 0.020 respectively. Conclusion: These Imaging QA results demonstrated that the TrueBeam, performed better in terms of image quality stability for both kV planer and CBCT images as well as EPID MV images, however other two linacs were also satisfied TG142 guidelines.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22626776
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; PHANTOMS; POLYSTYRENE; RECOMMENDATIONS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; TEFLON

Citation Formats

Altundal, Y, Pokhrel, D, Jiang, H, and Badkul, R. SU-F-I-02: Comparative Analysis and Constancy Check of Image Quality Parameters for Three Linear Accelerators Per TG 142 Protocol. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955830.
Altundal, Y, Pokhrel, D, Jiang, H, & Badkul, R. SU-F-I-02: Comparative Analysis and Constancy Check of Image Quality Parameters for Three Linear Accelerators Per TG 142 Protocol. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955830.
Altundal, Y, Pokhrel, D, Jiang, H, and Badkul, R. Wed . "SU-F-I-02: Comparative Analysis and Constancy Check of Image Quality Parameters for Three Linear Accelerators Per TG 142 Protocol". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955830.
@article{osti_22626776,
title = {SU-F-I-02: Comparative Analysis and Constancy Check of Image Quality Parameters for Three Linear Accelerators Per TG 142 Protocol},
author = {Altundal, Y and Pokhrel, D and Jiang, H and Badkul, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To compare image quality parameters and assessing the image stability of three different linear accelerators (linac) for 2D and 3D imaging modalities: planar kV, MV images and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Methods: QCkV1, QC-3 and Cathpan-600 phantoms were utilized to acquire kV, MV and CBCT images respectively on monthly basis per TG142 QA protocol for over 2 years on 21Ex, NovalisTx and TrueBeam linacs. DICOM images were analyzed with the help of QA analysis software: PIPsPro from Standard Imaging. For planar kV and MV images, planar spatial resolution, contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise; for CBCT, HU values were collected and analyzed. Results: Two years of monthly QA measurements were analyzed for the planar and CBCT images. Values were normalized to the mean and the standard deviations (STD) are presented. For the kV planar radiographic images the STD of spatial resolution for f30, f40, f50, CNR and noise for 21Ex are 0.006, 0.011, 0.013, 0.046, 0.026; Novalis-Tx are 0.009, 0.016, 0.016, 0.067, 0.053 ; TrueBeam are 0.007, 0.005, 0.009, 0.017, 0.016 respectively. For the MV planar radiographic images, the STD of spatial resolution for f30, f40, f50, CNR and noise for 21Ex are 0.009, 0.010, 0.008, 0.023, 0.023; for Novalix-Tx are 0.012, 0.010, 0.008, 0.029, 0.023 and for TrueBeam are 0.010, 0.010, 0.007, 0.022, 0.022 respectively. For the CBCT images, HU constancies of Air, Polystyrene, Teflon, PMP, LDPE and Delrin for 21Ex are 0.014, 0.070, 0.031, 0.053, 0.076, 0.087; for Novalis Tx are 0.019, 0.047, 0.035, 0.059, 0.077, 0.087 and for TrueBeam are 0.011, 0.044, 0.025, 0.044, 0.056, 0.020 respectively. Conclusion: These Imaging QA results demonstrated that the TrueBeam, performed better in terms of image quality stability for both kV planer and CBCT images as well as EPID MV images, however other two linacs were also satisfied TG142 guidelines.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955830},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: With increasing QA demands of medical physicists in clinical radiation oncology, the need for an effective method of tracking clinical data has become paramount. A tool was produced which scans through data automatically recorded by a 2D chamber array and extracts relevant information recommended by TG-142. Using this extracted information a timely and comprehensive analysis of QA parameters can be easily performed enabling efficient monthly checks on multiple linear accelerators simultaneously. Methods: A PTW STARCHECK chamber array was used to record several months of beam outputs from two Varian 2100 series linear accelerators and a Varian NovalisTx−. In conjunctionmore » with the chamber array, a beam quality phantom was used to simultaneously to determine beam quality. A minimalist GUI was created in MatLab that allows a user to set the file path of the data for each modality to be analyzed. These file paths are recorded to a MatLab structure and then subsequently accessed by a script written in Python (version 3.5.1) which then extracts values required to perform monthly checks as outlined by recommendations from TG-142. The script incorporates calculations to determine if the values recorded by the chamber array fall within an acceptable threshold. Results: Values obtained by the script are written to a spreadsheet where results can be easily viewed and annotated with a “pass” or “fail” and saved for further analysis. In addition to creating a new scheme for reviewing monthly checks, this application allows for able to succinctly store data for follow up analysis. Conclusion: By utilizing this tool, parameters recommended by TG-142 for multiple linear accelerators can be rapidly obtained and analyzed which can be used for evaluation of monthly checks.« less
  • Purpose: New radiation dose reduction technologies are emerging constantly in the medical imaging field. The latest of these technologies, iterative reconstruction (IR) in CT, presents the ability to reduce dose significantly and hence provides great opportunity for CT protocol optimization. However, without effective analysis of image quality, the reduction in radiation exposure becomes irrelevant. This work explores the use of postmortem subjects as an image quality assessment medium for protocol optimizations in abdominal CT. Methods: Three female postmortem subjects were scanned using the Abdomen-Pelvis (AP) protocol at reduced minimum tube current and target noise index (SD) settings of 12.5, 17.5,more » 20.0, and 25.0. Images were reconstructed using two strengths of iterative reconstruction. Radiologists and radiology residents from several subspecialties were asked to evaluate 8 AP image sets including the current facility default scan protocol and 7 scans with the parameters varied as listed above. Images were viewed in the soft tissue window and scored on a 3-point scale as acceptable, borderline acceptable, and unacceptable for diagnosis. The facility default AP scan was identified to the reviewer while the 7 remaining AP scans were randomized and de-identified of acquisition and reconstruction details. The observers were also asked to comment on the subjective image quality criteria they used for scoring images. This included visibility of specific anatomical structures and tissue textures. Results: Radiologists scored images as acceptable or borderline acceptable for target noise index settings of up to 20. Due to the postmortem subjects’ close representation of living human anatomy, readers were able to evaluate images as they would those of actual patients. Conclusion: Postmortem subjects have already been proven useful for direct CT organ dose measurements. This work illustrates the validity of their use for the crucial evaluation of image quality during CT protocol optimization, especially when investigating the effects of new technologies.« less
  • Purpose: A successful VMAT plan delivery includes precise modulations of dose rate, gantry rotational and multi-leaf collimator shapes. The purpose of this research is to construct routine QA protocol which focuses on VMAT delivery technique and to obtain a baseline including dose error, fluence distribution and mechanical accuracy during VMAT. Methods: The mock prostate, head and neck (HN) cases supplied from AAPM were used in this study. A VMAT plans were generated in Monaco TPS according to TG-119 protocol. Plans were created using 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams for each case. The phantom based measurement, fluence measurement andmore » log files analysis were performed. The dose measurement was performed using 0.6 cc ion chamber, which located at isocenter. The fluence distribution were acquired using the MapCHECK2 mounted in the MapPHAN. The trajectory log files recorded inner 20 leaf pairs and gantry angle positions at every 0.25 sec interval were exported to in-house software developed by MATLAB and determined those RMS values. Results: The dose difference is expressed as a ratio of the difference between measured and planned doses. The dose difference for 6 MV was 0.91%, for 10 MV was 0.67%. In turn, the fluence distribution using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm with a 50% minimum dose threshold for 6 MV was 98.8%, for 10 MV was 97.5%, respectively. The RMS values of MLC for 6 MV and 10 MV were 0.32 mm and 0.37 mm, of gantry were 0.33 degree and 0.31 degree. Conclusion: In this study, QA protocol to assess VMAT delivery accuracy is constructed and results acquired in this study are used as a baseline of VMAT delivery performance verification.« less
  • Purpose: To test the radiobiological impact of hypofractionated choroidal melanoma brachytherapy, we calculated single fraction equivalent doses (SFED) of the tumor that equivalent to 85 Gy of I125-BT for 20 patients. Corresponding organs-at-risks (OARs) doses were estimated. Methods: Twenty patients treated with I125-BT were retrospectively examined. The tumor SFED values were calculated from tumor BED using a conventional linear-quadratic (L-Q) model and an universal survival curve (USC). The opposite retina (α/β = 2.58), macula (2.58), optic disc (1.75), and lens (1.2) were examined. The % doses of OARs over tumor doses were assumed to be the same as for amore » single fraction delivery. The OAR SFED values were converted into BED and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD2) by using both L-Q and USC models, then compared to I125-BT. Results: The USC-based BED and EQD2 doses of the macula, optic disc, and the lens were on average 118 ± 46% (p < 0.0527), 126 ± 43% (p < 0.0354), and 112 ± 32% (p < 0.0265) higher than those of I125-BT, respectively. The BED and EQD2 doses of the opposite retina were 52 ± 9% lower than I125-BT. The tumor SFED values were 25.2 ± 3.3 Gy and 29.1 ± 2.5 Gy when using USC and LQ models which can be delivered within 1 hour. All BED and EQD2 values using L-Q model were significantly larger when compared to the USC model (p < 0.0274) due to its large single fraction size (> 14 Gy). Conclusion: The estimated single fraction doses were feasible to be delivered within 1 hour using a high dose rate source such as electronic brachytherapy (eBT). However, the estimated OAR doses using eBT were 112 ∼ 118% higher than when using the I125-BT technique. Continued exploration of alternative dose rate or fractionation schedules should be followed.« less
  • Purpose: Routine linac quality assurance (QA) tests have become complex enough to require automation of most test analyses. A new data analysis software library was built that allows physicists to automate routine linear accelerator quality assurance tests. The package is open source, code tested, and benchmarked. Methods: Images and data were generated on a TrueBeam linac for the following routine QA tests: VMAT, starshot, CBCT, machine logs, Winston Lutz, and picket fence. The analysis library was built using the general programming language Python. Each test was analyzed with the library algorithms and compared to manual measurements taken at the timemore » of acquisition. Results: VMAT QA results agreed within 0.1% between the library and manual measurements. Machine logs (dynalogs & trajectory logs) were successfully parsed; mechanical axis positions were verified for accuracy and MLC fluence agreed well with EPID measurements. CBCT QA measurements were within 10 HU and 0.2mm where applicable. Winston Lutz isocenter size measurements were within 0.2mm of TrueBeam’s Machine Performance Check. Starshot analysis was within 0.2mm of the Winston Lutz results for the same conditions. Picket fence images with and without a known error showed that the library was capable of detecting MLC offsets within 0.02mm. Conclusion: A new routine QA software library has been benchmarked and is available for use by the community. The library is open-source and extensible for use in larger systems.« less