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Title: SU-F-I-02: Comparative Analysis and Constancy Check of Image Quality Parameters for Three Linear Accelerators Per TG 142 Protocol

Abstract

Purpose: To compare image quality parameters and assessing the image stability of three different linear accelerators (linac) for 2D and 3D imaging modalities: planar kV, MV images and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Methods: QCkV1, QC-3 and Cathpan-600 phantoms were utilized to acquire kV, MV and CBCT images respectively on monthly basis per TG142 QA protocol for over 2 years on 21Ex, NovalisTx and TrueBeam linacs. DICOM images were analyzed with the help of QA analysis software: PIPsPro from Standard Imaging. For planar kV and MV images, planar spatial resolution, contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise; for CBCT, HU values were collected and analyzed. Results: Two years of monthly QA measurements were analyzed for the planar and CBCT images. Values were normalized to the mean and the standard deviations (STD) are presented. For the kV planar radiographic images the STD of spatial resolution for f30, f40, f50, CNR and noise for 21Ex are 0.006, 0.011, 0.013, 0.046, 0.026; Novalis-Tx are 0.009, 0.016, 0.016, 0.067, 0.053 ; TrueBeam are 0.007, 0.005, 0.009, 0.017, 0.016 respectively. For the MV planar radiographic images, the STD of spatial resolution for f30, f40, f50, CNR and noise for 21Ex are 0.009, 0.010, 0.008, 0.023, 0.023; formore » Novalix-Tx are 0.012, 0.010, 0.008, 0.029, 0.023 and for TrueBeam are 0.010, 0.010, 0.007, 0.022, 0.022 respectively. For the CBCT images, HU constancies of Air, Polystyrene, Teflon, PMP, LDPE and Delrin for 21Ex are 0.014, 0.070, 0.031, 0.053, 0.076, 0.087; for Novalis Tx are 0.019, 0.047, 0.035, 0.059, 0.077, 0.087 and for TrueBeam are 0.011, 0.044, 0.025, 0.044, 0.056, 0.020 respectively. Conclusion: These Imaging QA results demonstrated that the TrueBeam, performed better in terms of image quality stability for both kV planer and CBCT images as well as EPID MV images, however other two linacs were also satisfied TG142 guidelines.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22626776
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; PHANTOMS; POLYSTYRENE; RECOMMENDATIONS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; TEFLON

Citation Formats

Altundal, Y, Pokhrel, D, Jiang, H, and Badkul, R. SU-F-I-02: Comparative Analysis and Constancy Check of Image Quality Parameters for Three Linear Accelerators Per TG 142 Protocol. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955830.
Altundal, Y, Pokhrel, D, Jiang, H, & Badkul, R. SU-F-I-02: Comparative Analysis and Constancy Check of Image Quality Parameters for Three Linear Accelerators Per TG 142 Protocol. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955830.
Altundal, Y, Pokhrel, D, Jiang, H, and Badkul, R. 2016. "SU-F-I-02: Comparative Analysis and Constancy Check of Image Quality Parameters for Three Linear Accelerators Per TG 142 Protocol". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955830.
@article{osti_22626776,
title = {SU-F-I-02: Comparative Analysis and Constancy Check of Image Quality Parameters for Three Linear Accelerators Per TG 142 Protocol},
author = {Altundal, Y and Pokhrel, D and Jiang, H and Badkul, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To compare image quality parameters and assessing the image stability of three different linear accelerators (linac) for 2D and 3D imaging modalities: planar kV, MV images and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Methods: QCkV1, QC-3 and Cathpan-600 phantoms were utilized to acquire kV, MV and CBCT images respectively on monthly basis per TG142 QA protocol for over 2 years on 21Ex, NovalisTx and TrueBeam linacs. DICOM images were analyzed with the help of QA analysis software: PIPsPro from Standard Imaging. For planar kV and MV images, planar spatial resolution, contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise; for CBCT, HU values were collected and analyzed. Results: Two years of monthly QA measurements were analyzed for the planar and CBCT images. Values were normalized to the mean and the standard deviations (STD) are presented. For the kV planar radiographic images the STD of spatial resolution for f30, f40, f50, CNR and noise for 21Ex are 0.006, 0.011, 0.013, 0.046, 0.026; Novalis-Tx are 0.009, 0.016, 0.016, 0.067, 0.053 ; TrueBeam are 0.007, 0.005, 0.009, 0.017, 0.016 respectively. For the MV planar radiographic images, the STD of spatial resolution for f30, f40, f50, CNR and noise for 21Ex are 0.009, 0.010, 0.008, 0.023, 0.023; for Novalix-Tx are 0.012, 0.010, 0.008, 0.029, 0.023 and for TrueBeam are 0.010, 0.010, 0.007, 0.022, 0.022 respectively. For the CBCT images, HU constancies of Air, Polystyrene, Teflon, PMP, LDPE and Delrin for 21Ex are 0.014, 0.070, 0.031, 0.053, 0.076, 0.087; for Novalis Tx are 0.019, 0.047, 0.035, 0.059, 0.077, 0.087 and for TrueBeam are 0.011, 0.044, 0.025, 0.044, 0.056, 0.020 respectively. Conclusion: These Imaging QA results demonstrated that the TrueBeam, performed better in terms of image quality stability for both kV planer and CBCT images as well as EPID MV images, however other two linacs were also satisfied TG142 guidelines.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955830},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Spectral quality at different locations across a 40 x 40 cm/sup 2/ field and on the central-axis for different field sizes from Clinac-4 and Clinac-6 accelerators has been measured using the photoactivation ratio method. This method is based on a measurement of the ratio of photoactivation rates induced by /sup 115/In(..gamma..,..gamma..') and D(..gamma..,n) x /sup 115/In(n,..gamma..). Despite the high sensitivity of this technique, no significant variation of spectral quality across the irradiation field in air and for different field sizes on the central-axis is observed.
  • Purpose: Deformable image registration (DIR) is used routinely in the clinic without a formalized quality assurance (QA) process. Using simulated deformations to digitally deform images in a known way and comparing to DIR algorithm predictions is a powerful technique for DIR QA. This technique must also simulate realistic image noise and artifacts, especially between modalities. This study developed an algorithm to create simulated daily kV cone-beam computed-tomography (CBCT) images from CT images for DIR QA between these modalities. Methods: A Catphan and physical head-and-neck phantom, with known deformations, were used. CT and kV-CBCT images of the Catphan were utilized tomore » characterize the changes in Hounsfield units, noise, and image cupping that occur between these imaging modalities. The algorithm then imprinted these changes onto a CT image of the deformed head-and-neck phantom, thereby creating a simulated-CBCT image. CT and kV-CBCT images of the undeformed and deformed head-and-neck phantom were also acquired. The Velocity and MIM DIR algorithms were applied between the undeformed CT image and each of the deformed CT, CBCT, and simulated-CBCT images to obtain predicted deformations. The error between the known and predicted deformations was used as a metric to evaluate the quality of the simulated-CBCT image. Ideally, the simulated-CBCT image registration would produce the same accuracy as the deformed CBCT image registration. Results: For Velocity, the mean error was 1.4 mm for the CT-CT registration, 1.7 mm for the CT-CBCT registration, and 1.4 mm for the CT-simulated-CBCT registration. These same numbers were 1.5, 4.5, and 5.9 mm, respectively, for MIM. Conclusion: All cases produced similar accuracy for Velocity. MIM produced similar values of accuracy for CT-CT registration, but was not as accurate for CT-CBCT registrations. The MIM simulated-CBCT registration followed this same trend, but overestimated MIM DIR errors relative to the CT-CBCT registration.« less
  • Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated aftermore » imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min{sup −1} with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels{sup −1}.« less
  • A constancy check is described for dosimeters using fast op--amp electrometers with remote ionization chambers. The check's usefulness is reported, as are capacitance values for some commercial ion chambers.
  • Purpose: Evaluate the utility of tests in a proposed protocol for constancy control of digital mammography systems. Methods: The protocol contained tests for image acquisition, mechanical function and safety, monitors and printers, and viewing conditions. Nine sites with digital systems from four equipment manufacturers were recruited. Dedicated PMMA test objects and Excel spreadsheets were developed. Quantitative measurements were done on processed images for systems where these images were the ones most readily available. For daily assessment of the automatic exposure control system, a homogeneous PMMA phantom was exposed under clinical conditions. The mAs and signal to noise ratio (SNR) weremore » recorded, the deviation from a target value calculated, and the resulting image inspected for artifacts. For thickness tracking, the signal difference to noise ratio obtained for three thicknesses was calculated. Detector uniformity was assessed through comparison of SNR values for regions of interest in the center and corners of an image of a homogeneous test object. Mechanical function and safety control included a compression test, a checklist for mechanical aspects, and control of field alignment. Monitor performance was evaluated by visual inspection of the AAPM TG 18 QC test image [E. Samei et al., ''Assessment of display performance for medical imaging systems,'' Task Group 18 (Madison, WI, April 2005)]. Results: For quantitative parameters, target values and tolerance limits were established. Test results exceeding the limits were registered. Most systems exhibited stable mAs values, indicating that the tolerance limit of {+-}10% was readily achievable. The SNR also showed little variation, indicating that the tolerance limit of {+-}20% was too wide. At one site, a defective grid caused artifacts that were visible in the test images. The monitor controls proved more difficult to implement due to both difficulties importing and displaying the test image, and the radiographic technologists not getting necessary access to the reading stations. Conclusions: The proposed tests could easily be performed by trained radiographic technologists and within a time frame comparable to similar programs for analog systems. Tests with quantitative measures were more readily performed than procedures that required a subjective evaluation. Several of the proposed tests revealed equipment performance that required intervention, and which would otherwise have gone unnoticed. They therefore defend a place in a vendor-independent constancy control protocol.« less