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Title: SU-F-R-08: Can Normalization of Brain MRI Texture Features Reduce Scanner-Dependent Effects in Unsupervised Machine Learning?

Abstract

Purpose: To reduce differences in features calculated from MRI brain scans acquired at different field strengths with or without Gadolinium contrast. Methods: Brain scans were processed for 111 epilepsy patients to extract hippocampus and thalamus features. Scans were acquired on 1.5 T scanners with Gadolinium contrast (group A), 1.5T scanners without Gd (group B), and 3.0 T scanners without Gd (group C). A total of 72 features were extracted. Features were extracted from original scans and from scans where the image pixel values were rescaled to the mean of the hippocampi and thalami values. For each data set, cluster analysis was performed on the raw feature set and for feature sets with normalization (conversion to Z scores). Two methods of normalization were used: The first was over all values of a given feature, and the second by normalizing within the patient group membership. The clustering software was configured to produce 3 clusters. Group fractions in each cluster were calculated. Results: For features calculated from both the non-rescaled and rescaled data, cluster membership was identical for both the non-normalized and normalized data sets. Cluster 1 was comprised entirely of Group A data, Cluster 2 contained data from all three groups, andmore » Cluster 3 contained data from only groups 1 and 2. For the categorically normalized data sets there was a more uniform distribution of group data in the three Clusters. A less pronounced effect was seen in the rescaled image data features. Conclusion: Image Rescaling and feature renormalization can have a significant effect on the results of clustering analysis. These effects are also likely to influence the results of supervised machine learning algorithms. It may be possible to partly remove the influence of scanner field strength and the presence of Gadolinium based contrast in feature extraction for radiomics applications.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States)
  2. Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States)
  3. Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22626736
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ALGORITHMS; COMPUTER CODES; EPILEPSY; GADOLINIUM; HIPPOCAMPUS; IMAGES; LEARNING; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; RENORMALIZATION; THALAMUS; CLUSTER ANALYSIS

Citation Formats

Ogden, K, O’Dwyer, R, Bradford, T, and Cussen, L. SU-F-R-08: Can Normalization of Brain MRI Texture Features Reduce Scanner-Dependent Effects in Unsupervised Machine Learning?. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955780.
Ogden, K, O’Dwyer, R, Bradford, T, & Cussen, L. SU-F-R-08: Can Normalization of Brain MRI Texture Features Reduce Scanner-Dependent Effects in Unsupervised Machine Learning?. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955780.
Ogden, K, O’Dwyer, R, Bradford, T, and Cussen, L. Wed . "SU-F-R-08: Can Normalization of Brain MRI Texture Features Reduce Scanner-Dependent Effects in Unsupervised Machine Learning?". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955780.
@article{osti_22626736,
title = {SU-F-R-08: Can Normalization of Brain MRI Texture Features Reduce Scanner-Dependent Effects in Unsupervised Machine Learning?},
author = {Ogden, K and O’Dwyer, R and Bradford, T and Cussen, L},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To reduce differences in features calculated from MRI brain scans acquired at different field strengths with or without Gadolinium contrast. Methods: Brain scans were processed for 111 epilepsy patients to extract hippocampus and thalamus features. Scans were acquired on 1.5 T scanners with Gadolinium contrast (group A), 1.5T scanners without Gd (group B), and 3.0 T scanners without Gd (group C). A total of 72 features were extracted. Features were extracted from original scans and from scans where the image pixel values were rescaled to the mean of the hippocampi and thalami values. For each data set, cluster analysis was performed on the raw feature set and for feature sets with normalization (conversion to Z scores). Two methods of normalization were used: The first was over all values of a given feature, and the second by normalizing within the patient group membership. The clustering software was configured to produce 3 clusters. Group fractions in each cluster were calculated. Results: For features calculated from both the non-rescaled and rescaled data, cluster membership was identical for both the non-normalized and normalized data sets. Cluster 1 was comprised entirely of Group A data, Cluster 2 contained data from all three groups, and Cluster 3 contained data from only groups 1 and 2. For the categorically normalized data sets there was a more uniform distribution of group data in the three Clusters. A less pronounced effect was seen in the rescaled image data features. Conclusion: Image Rescaling and feature renormalization can have a significant effect on the results of clustering analysis. These effects are also likely to influence the results of supervised machine learning algorithms. It may be possible to partly remove the influence of scanner field strength and the presence of Gadolinium based contrast in feature extraction for radiomics applications.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955780},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}