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Title: SU-F-P-61: Does It Matter Not to Use Optimization Points at the Apex for Vaginal Cylinder HDR Brachytherapy Planning?

Abstract

Purpose: To test the impact of the use of apex optimization points for new vaginal cylinder (VC) applicators. Methods: New “ClickFit” single channel VC applicators (Varian) that have a different top thicknesses but the same diameters as the old VC applicators (2.3 cm diameter, 2.6 cm, 3.0 cm, and 3.5 cm) were compared using phantom studies. Old VC applicator plans without apex optimization points were also compared to the plans with the optimization points. The apex doses were monitored at 5 mm depth doses (8 points) where a prescription dose (Rx) of 6Gy was prescribed. VC surface doses (8 points) were also analyzed. Results: The new VC applicator plans without apex optimization points presented significantly lower 5mm depth doses than Rx (on average −31 ± 7%, p <0.00001) due to their thicker VC tops (3.4 ± 1.1 mm thicker with the range of 1.2 to 4.4 mm) than the old VC applicators. Old VC applicator plans also showed a statistically significant reduction (p <0.00001) due to Ir-192 source anisotropic effect at the apex region but the % reduction over Rx was only −7 ± 9%. However, by adding apex optimization points to the new VC applicator plans, the plans improvedmore » 5 mm depth doses (−7 ± 9% over Rx) that were not statistically different from old VC plans (p = 0.923), along with apex VC surface doses (−22 ± 10% over old VC versus −46 ± 7% without using apex optimization points). Conclusion: The use of apex optimization points are important in order to avoid significant additional cold doses (−24 ± 2%) at the prescription depth (5 mm) of apex, especially for the new VC applicators that have thicker tops.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University Of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22626729
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANISOTROPY; BRACHYTHERAPY; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; IRIDIUM 192; OPTIMIZATION; PHANTOMS; PLANNING; THICKNESS

Citation Formats

Kim, Y. SU-F-P-61: Does It Matter Not to Use Optimization Points at the Apex for Vaginal Cylinder HDR Brachytherapy Planning?. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955769.
Kim, Y. SU-F-P-61: Does It Matter Not to Use Optimization Points at the Apex for Vaginal Cylinder HDR Brachytherapy Planning?. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955769.
Kim, Y. 2016. "SU-F-P-61: Does It Matter Not to Use Optimization Points at the Apex for Vaginal Cylinder HDR Brachytherapy Planning?". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955769.
@article{osti_22626729,
title = {SU-F-P-61: Does It Matter Not to Use Optimization Points at the Apex for Vaginal Cylinder HDR Brachytherapy Planning?},
author = {Kim, Y},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To test the impact of the use of apex optimization points for new vaginal cylinder (VC) applicators. Methods: New “ClickFit” single channel VC applicators (Varian) that have a different top thicknesses but the same diameters as the old VC applicators (2.3 cm diameter, 2.6 cm, 3.0 cm, and 3.5 cm) were compared using phantom studies. Old VC applicator plans without apex optimization points were also compared to the plans with the optimization points. The apex doses were monitored at 5 mm depth doses (8 points) where a prescription dose (Rx) of 6Gy was prescribed. VC surface doses (8 points) were also analyzed. Results: The new VC applicator plans without apex optimization points presented significantly lower 5mm depth doses than Rx (on average −31 ± 7%, p <0.00001) due to their thicker VC tops (3.4 ± 1.1 mm thicker with the range of 1.2 to 4.4 mm) than the old VC applicators. Old VC applicator plans also showed a statistically significant reduction (p <0.00001) due to Ir-192 source anisotropic effect at the apex region but the % reduction over Rx was only −7 ± 9%. However, by adding apex optimization points to the new VC applicator plans, the plans improved 5 mm depth doses (−7 ± 9% over Rx) that were not statistically different from old VC plans (p = 0.923), along with apex VC surface doses (−22 ± 10% over old VC versus −46 ± 7% without using apex optimization points). Conclusion: The use of apex optimization points are important in order to avoid significant additional cold doses (−24 ± 2%) at the prescription depth (5 mm) of apex, especially for the new VC applicators that have thicker tops.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955769},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate bladder and rectal doses using two-dimensional (2D) and 3D treatment planning for vaginal cuff high-dose rate (HDR) in endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients treated between 2000 and 2007 were evaluated. Seventy-one and 20 patients underwent 2D and 3D planning, respectively. Each patient received six fractions prescribed at 0.5 cm to the superior 3 cm of the vagina. International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) doses were calculated for 2D patients. Maximum and 2-cc doses were calculated for 3D patients. Organ doses were normalized to prescription dose. Results: Bladder maximum doses were 178% ofmore » ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were no different than ICRU doses (p = 0.22). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 59% of maximum doses (p < 0.0001). Rectal maximum doses were 137% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 87% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 64% of maximum doses (p < 0.0001). Using the first 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 fractions, we predicted the final bladder dose to within 10% for 44%, 59%, 83%, 82%, and 89% of patients by using the ICRU dose, and for 45%, 55%, 80%, 85%, and 85% of patients by using the maximum dose, and for 37%, 68%, 79%, 79%, and 84% of patients by using the 2-cc dose. Using the first 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 fractions, we predicted the final rectal dose to within 10% for 100%, 100%, 100%, 100%, and 100% of patients by using the ICRU dose, and for 60%, 65%, 70%, 75%, and 75% of patients by using the maximum dose, and for 68%, 95%, 84%, 84%, and 84% of patients by using the 2-cc dose. Conclusions: Doses to organs at risk vary depending on the calculation method. In some cases, final dose accuracy appears to plateau after the third fraction, indicating that simulation and planning may not be necessary in all fractions. A clinically relevant level of accuracy should be determined and further research conducted to address this issue.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of bladder filling on organs at risk (OARs) using three-dimensional image-based treatment planning for vaginal cylinder brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent postoperative high-dose rate vaginal cylinder brachytherapy. For three-dimensional planning, patients were simulated by computed tomography with an indwelling catheter in place (empty bladder) and with 180 mL of sterile water instilled into the bladder (full bladder). The bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and small bowel (OARs) were contoured, and a prescription dose was generated for 10 to 35 Gy in 2 to 5 fractions at the surface ormore » at 5 mm depth. For each OAR, the volume dose was defined by use of two different criteria: the minimum dose value in a 2.0-cc volume receiving the highest dose (D{sub 2cc}) and the dose received by 50% of the OAR volume (D{sub 50%}). International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) bladder and rectum point doses were calculated for comparison. The cylinder-to-bowel distance was measured using the shortest distance from the cylinder apex to the contoured sigmoid or small bowel. Statistical analyses were performed with paired t tests. Results: Mean bladder and rectum D{sub 2cc} values were lower than their respective ICRU doses. However, differences between D{sub 2cc} and ICRU doses were small. Empty vs. full bladder did not significantly affect the mean cylinder-to-bowel distance (0.72 vs. 0.92 cm, p = 0.08). In contrast, bladder distention had appreciable effects on bladder and small bowel volume dosimetry. With a full bladder, the mean small bowel D{sub 2cc} significantly decreased from 677 to 408 cGy (p = 0.004); the mean bladder D{sub 2cc} did not increase significantly (1,179 cGy vs. 1,246 cGy, p = 0.11). Bladder distention decreased the mean D{sub 50%} for both the bladder (441 vs. 279 cGy, p = 0.001) and the small bowel (168 vs. 132 cGy, p = 0.001). Rectum and sigmoid volume doses were not affected by bladder filling. Conclusions: In high-dose rate vaginal cylinder brachytherapy, treatment with a distended bladder preferentially reduces high dose to the small bowel around the vaginal cuff without a significant change in dose to the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the effects of the prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (HDR-VBT) of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were prescribed and optimized based on points at the cylinder surface or at 0.5-cm depth. Cylinder sizes ranging from 2 to 4 cm in diameter, and treatment lengths ranging from 3 to 8 cm were used. Dose points in various depths were precisely defined along the cylinder dome. The given dose and dose uniformity to a depth of interest were measured by the mean dose (MD) and standard deviationmore » (SD), respectively, among the dose points belonging to the depth. Dose fall-off beyond the 0.5 cm treatment depth was determined by the ratio of MD at 0.75-cm depth to MD at 0.5-cm depth. Results: Dose distribution varies significantly with different prescriptions. The surface prescription provides more uniform doses at all depths in the target volume, whereas the 0.5-cm depth prescription creates larger dose variations at the cylinder surface. Dosimetric uncertainty increases significantly (>30%) with shorter tip space. Extreme hot (>150%) and cold spots (<60%) occur if no optimization points were placed at the curved end. Conclusions: Instead of prescribing to a depth of 0.5 cm, increasing the dose per fraction and prescribing to the surface with the exact surface points around the cylinder dome appears to be the optimal approach.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of MR-based vaginal brachytherapy source localization using an in-house MR-visible marker versus the alignment of an applicator model to MR images. Methods: Three consecutive patients undergoing vaginal HDR brachytherapy with a plastic cylinder were scanned with both CT and MRI (including T1- and T2- weighted images). An MR-visible source localization marker, consisting of a sealed thin catheter filled with either water (for T2 contrast) or Gd-doped water (for T1 contrast), was assembled shortly before scanning. Clinically, the applicator channel was digitized on CT with an x-ray marker. To evaluate the efficacy of MR-based applicator reconstruction,more » each MR image volume was aligned locally to the CT images based on the region containing the cylinder. Applicator digitization was performed on the MR images using (1) the MR visible marker and (2) alignment of an applicator surface model from Varian's Brachytherapy Planning software to the MRI images. Resulting source positions were compared with the original CT digitization. Results: Although the source path was visualized by the MR marker, the applicator tip proved difficult to identify due to challenges in achieving a watertight seal. This resulted in observed displacements of the catheter tip, at times >1cm. Deviations between the central source positions identified via aligning the applicator surface model to MR and using the xray marker on CT ranged from 0.07 – 0.19 cm and 0.07 – 0.20 cm on T1- weighted and T2-weighted images, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the current study, aligning the applicator model to MRI provides a practical, current approach to perform MR-based brachytherapy planning. Further study is needed to produce catheters with reliably and reproducibly identifiable tips. Attempts are being made to improve catheter seals, as well as to increase the viscosity of the contrast material to decrease fluid mobility inside the catheter.« less
  • Purpose: The multichannel cylindrical vaginal applicator is a variation of traditional single channel cylindrical vaginal applicator. The multichannel applicator has additional peripheral channels that provide more flexibility in the planning process. The dosimetric advantage is to reduce dose to adjacent organ at risk (OAR) such as bladder and rectum while maintaining target coverage with the dose optimization from additional channels. Methods: Vaginal HDR brachytherapy plans are all CT based. CT images were acquired in 2 mm thickness to keep integrity of cylinder contouring. The CTV of 5mm Rind with prescribed treatment length was reconstructed from 5mm expansion of inserted cylinder.more » The goal was 95% of CTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose in both single channel planning (SCP)and multichannel planning (MCP) before proceeding any further optimization for dose reduction to critical structures with emphasis on D2cc and V2Gy . Results: This study demonstrated noticeable dose reduction to OAR was apparent in multichannel plans. The D2cc of the rectum and bladder were showing the reduced dose for multichannel versus single channel. The V2Gy of the rectum was 93.72% and 83.79% (p=0.007) for single channel and multichannel respectively (Figure 1 and Table 1). To assure adequate coverage to target while reducing the dose to the OAR without any compromise is the main goal in using multichannel vaginal applicator in HDR brachytherapy. Conclusion: Multichannel plans were optimized using anatomical based inverse optimization algorithm of inverse planning simulation annealing. The optimization solution of the algorithm was to improve the clinical target volume dose coverage while reducing the dose to critical organs such as bladder, rectum and bowels. The comparison between SCP and MCP demonstrated MCP is superior to SCP where the dwell positions were based on geometric array only. It concluded that MCP is preferable and is able to provide certain features superior to SCP.« less