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Title: SU-F-P-55: Testicular Scatter Dose Determination During Prostate SBRT with and Without Pelvic Lymph Nodes

Abstract

Purpose: The elective irradiation of pelvis lymph node for prostate cancer is still controversial. Including pelvic lymph node as part of the planning target volume could increase the testicular scatter dose, which could have a clinical impact. The objective of this work was to measure testicular scatter dose for prostate SBRT treatment with and without pelvic lymph nodes using TLD dosimetry. Methods: A 6MV beam (1000UM/min) produce by a Novalis TX (BrainLAB-VARIAN) equipped HDMLC was used. Treatment plan were done using iPlan v4.5.3 (BrainLAB) treatment planning system with sliding windows IMRT technique. Prostate SBRT plan (PLAN-1) uses 9 beams with a dose prescription (D95%) of 4000cGy in 5 fractions. Prostate with lymph nodes SBRT plan (PLAN-2) uses 11 beams with a dose prescription (D95%) of 4000cGy to the prostate and 2500cGy to the lymph node in 5 fractions. An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom with a testicular volume was used. Phantom was positioned using ExacTrac IGRT system. Phosphor TLDs LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD700 Harshaw) were positioned in the anterior, posterior and inferior portion of the testicle. Two set of TLD measurements was done for each treatment plan. TLD in vivo dosimetry was done in one patient for each treatment plan. Results: The averagemore » phantom scatter doses per fraction for the PLAN-1 were 10.9±1cGy (anterior), 7.8±1cGy (inferior) and 10.7±1cGy (posterior) which represent an average total dose of 48±1cGy (1.2% of prostate dose prescription). The doses for PLAN-2 plan were 17.7±1cGy (anterior), 11±1cGy (inferior) and 13.3±1cGy (posterior) which represent an average total dose of 70.1±1cGy (1.8% of prostate dose prescription). The average dose for in vivo patient dosimetry was 60±1cGy for PLAN-1 and 85±1cGy for PLAN-2. Conclusion: Phantom and in vivo dosimetry shows that the pelvic lymph node irradiation with SBRT slightly increases the testicular scatter dose, which could have a clinical impact.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Instituto de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba (Argentina)
  2. Ceprocor, Cordoba (Argentina)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22626725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BEAMS; IN VIVO; IRRADIATION; LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PELVIS; PHANTOMS; PLANNING; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; TESTES; THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETRY

Citation Formats

Venencia, C, Garrigo, E, Castro Pena, P, Torres, J, Zunino, S, and Germanier, A. SU-F-P-55: Testicular Scatter Dose Determination During Prostate SBRT with and Without Pelvic Lymph Nodes. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955762.
Venencia, C, Garrigo, E, Castro Pena, P, Torres, J, Zunino, S, & Germanier, A. SU-F-P-55: Testicular Scatter Dose Determination During Prostate SBRT with and Without Pelvic Lymph Nodes. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955762.
Venencia, C, Garrigo, E, Castro Pena, P, Torres, J, Zunino, S, and Germanier, A. 2016. "SU-F-P-55: Testicular Scatter Dose Determination During Prostate SBRT with and Without Pelvic Lymph Nodes". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955762.
@article{osti_22626725,
title = {SU-F-P-55: Testicular Scatter Dose Determination During Prostate SBRT with and Without Pelvic Lymph Nodes},
author = {Venencia, C and Garrigo, E and Castro Pena, P and Torres, J and Zunino, S and Germanier, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The elective irradiation of pelvis lymph node for prostate cancer is still controversial. Including pelvic lymph node as part of the planning target volume could increase the testicular scatter dose, which could have a clinical impact. The objective of this work was to measure testicular scatter dose for prostate SBRT treatment with and without pelvic lymph nodes using TLD dosimetry. Methods: A 6MV beam (1000UM/min) produce by a Novalis TX (BrainLAB-VARIAN) equipped HDMLC was used. Treatment plan were done using iPlan v4.5.3 (BrainLAB) treatment planning system with sliding windows IMRT technique. Prostate SBRT plan (PLAN-1) uses 9 beams with a dose prescription (D95%) of 4000cGy in 5 fractions. Prostate with lymph nodes SBRT plan (PLAN-2) uses 11 beams with a dose prescription (D95%) of 4000cGy to the prostate and 2500cGy to the lymph node in 5 fractions. An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom with a testicular volume was used. Phantom was positioned using ExacTrac IGRT system. Phosphor TLDs LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD700 Harshaw) were positioned in the anterior, posterior and inferior portion of the testicle. Two set of TLD measurements was done for each treatment plan. TLD in vivo dosimetry was done in one patient for each treatment plan. Results: The average phantom scatter doses per fraction for the PLAN-1 were 10.9±1cGy (anterior), 7.8±1cGy (inferior) and 10.7±1cGy (posterior) which represent an average total dose of 48±1cGy (1.2% of prostate dose prescription). The doses for PLAN-2 plan were 17.7±1cGy (anterior), 11±1cGy (inferior) and 13.3±1cGy (posterior) which represent an average total dose of 70.1±1cGy (1.8% of prostate dose prescription). The average dose for in vivo patient dosimetry was 60±1cGy for PLAN-1 and 85±1cGy for PLAN-2. Conclusion: Phantom and in vivo dosimetry shows that the pelvic lymph node irradiation with SBRT slightly increases the testicular scatter dose, which could have a clinical impact.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955762},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: The use of pelvic radiation for patients with a high risk of lymph node (LN) metastasis (>15%) remains controversial. We reviewed the data at three institutions treating patients with a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy to address the prognostic implications of the use of the Roach formula and the benefit of pelvic treatment. Methods and Materials: From 1986 to 2003, 1,491 patients were treated with external-beam radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The Roach formula [2/3 prostate-specific antigen + (Gleason score -6) x 10] could be calculated for 1,357 patients. Group I consisted of patients having amore » risk of positive LN {<=}15% (n = 761), Group II had a risk >15% and {<=}30% (n = 422), and Group III had a risk of LN disease >30% (n 174). A >15% risk of having positive LN was found in 596 patients and was used to determine the benefit of pelvic radiation. The pelvis was treated at two of the cancer centers (n = 312), whereas at the third center (n = 284) radiation therapy was delivered to the prostate and seminal vesicles alone. Average biologic effective dose was {>=}100 Gy ({alpha}{beta} = 1.2). Biochemical failure was as per the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition. Statistics included the log-rank test as well as Cox univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: For all 596 patients with a positive LN risk >15%, median follow-up was 4.3 years, with a mean of 4.8 years. For all cases, median follow-up was 4 years and mean follow-up was 4.4 years. Five-year results for the three groups based on their risk of positive LN were significantly different in terms of biochemical failure (p < 0.001), clinical control (p < 0.001), disease-free survival excluding biochemical failure (p < 0.001), cause-specific survival (p < 0.001), and overall survival (p < 0.001). For all patients with a risk of positive LN >15% (n 596), Group II (>15-30% risk), or Group III (>30% risk), no benefit was seen in the 5-year rates of clinical failure, cause-specific survival, or overall survival with pelvic radiation. In the Cox multivariate analysis for cause-specific survival, Gleason score (p = 0.009, hazard ratio [HR] 3.1), T stage (p = 0.03, HR 1.8), and year of treatment (p = 0.05, HR 1.1) were significant. A log-rank test for cause-specific survival for all patients (n = 577) by the use of pelvic radiation was not significant (p = 0.99) accounting for high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose, neoadjuvant hormones, Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, T stage, and year of treatment as covariates. Conclusions: The use of the Roach formula to stratify patients for clinical and biochemical outcomes is excellent. Pelvic radiation added to high prostate radiation doses did not show a clinical benefit for patients at a high risk of pelvic LN disease (>15%) selected using the Roach formula.« less
  • Concurrent treatment of the prostate and the pelvic lymph nodes encounters the problem of the prostate gland moving independently from the pelvic lymph nodes on a daily basis. The purpose of this study is to develop a leaf-tracking algorithm for adjustment of IMRT portals without requirement of online dose calculation to account for daily prostate position during concurrent treatment with pelvic lymph nodes. A leaf-shifting algorithm was developed and programmed to adjust the positions of selected MLC leaf pairs according to prostate movement in the plane perpendicular to each beam angle. IMRT plans from five patients with concurrent treatment ofmore » the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes were selected to test the feasibility of this algorithm by comparison with isocenter-shifted plans, using defined dose endpoints. When the prostate moved 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 cm along the anterior/posterior direction, the average doses to 95% of the prostate (D{sub 95%}) for the iso-shift plans were similar to the MLC-shift plans, (54.7, 54.4, and 54.1 Gy versus 54.5, 54.3, and 53.9 Gy, respectively). The corresponding D{sub 95%} averages to the pelvic lymph nodes were reduced from the prescription dose of 45 Gy to 42.7, 38.3, and 34.0 Gy for iso-shift plans (p=0.04 for each comparison), while the D{sub 95%} averages for the MLC-shift plans did not significantly differ from the prescription dose, at 45.0, 44.8, and 44.5 Gy. Compensation for prostate movement along the superior/inferior direction was more complicated due to a limiting MLC leaf width of 1.0 cm. In order to concurrently treat the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes with the prostate moving independently, shifting selected MLC leaf pairs may be a more practical adaptive solution than shifting the patient.« less
  • Purpose: The use of fiducials markers in prostate treatment allows a precise localization of this volume. Typical prostate SBRT margins with fiducials markers are 5mm in all directions, except toward the rectum, where 3mm is used. For some patients nearby pelvic lymph nodes with 5mm margin need to be irradiate assuming that its localization is linked to the prostate fiducial markers instead of bony anatomy. The purpose of this work was to analyze the geometric impact of locate the lymph node regions through the patient positioning by prostate fiducial markers. Methods: 10 patients with prostate SBRT with lymph nodes irradiationmore » were selected. Each patient had 5 implanted titanium fiducial markers. A Novalis TX (BrainLAB-Varian) with ExacTrac and aSi1000 portal image was used. Treatment plan uses 11 beams with a dose prescription (D95%) of 40Gy to the prostate and 25Gy to the lymph node in 5 fractions. Daily positioning was carried out by ExacTrac system based on the implanted fiducials as the reference treatment position; further position verification was performed using the ExacTrac and two portal images (gantry angle 0 and 90) based on bony structures. Comparison between reference position with bony based ExacTrac and portal image localization, was done for each treatment fraction Results: A total of 50 positioning analysis were done. The average discrepancy between reference treatment position and ExacTrac based on bony anatomy (pubic area) was 4.2mm [0.3; 11.2]. The discrepancy was <5mm in 61% of the cases and <9mm in 92%. Using portal images the average discrepancy was 3.7mm [0.0; 11.1]. The discrepancy was <5mm in 69% of the cases and <9mm in 96%. Conclusion: Localizing lymph node by prostate fiducial markers may produce large discrepancy as large as 11mm compared to bony based localization. Dosimetric impact of this discrepancy should be studied.« less
  • Purpose: To assess whether a 4-field box technique (4FBT), along with its technical refinements, is an adequate approach in terms of rectal sparing and target coverage for patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing whole-pelvic radiotherapy followed by a prostate boost and whether or not intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is needed. Methods and Materials: For 8 patients, 31 plans were generated, each of them differing in one or more features, including prescription (dose/volume) and/or technical factors. For the latter, several 'solutions' to try to reduce the amount of irradiated rectal volume were addressed, including modifications of the 4FBT and the use ofmore » sequential IMRT. We constructed a database with 248 plans that were tested for their ability to meet a series of rectal dose-volume constraints at V50, V60, V65, V70, V75, and V75.6. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors independently associated with the end point. Successful solutions were also compared in terms of coverage of both pelvic node and prostate planning target volume (PTV) by isodose 95%. Results: At multivariate logistic regression, both rectal blocking and IMRT were independent predictors of the probability of meeting rectal dose-volume constraints during the pelvic and boost phases of treatment with close relative risks. However, on average, partial rectal blocking on lateral fields of 4FBT during whole-pelvic radiotherapy resulted in about 3% of pelvic node PTV being outside isodose 95%; only 2 of 8 patients had the pelvic nodal PTV covered similarly to what was achieved by whole-pelvis IMRT. Conversely, blocking the rectum during the last 3 fractions of the conformal boost showed a dosimetric coverage of prostate PTV similar to that achieved by IMRT boost. Interestingly, patient anatomic configuration was the strongest predictor of rectal sparing. Finally, the size of prostate margins to generate PTV was also independently associated with the probability of meeting rectal dose-volume constraints. Conclusion: In the dose range of 70-76 Gy to the prostate, IMRT and standard techniques are equally effective in meeting rectal dose-volume constraints. However, whole-pelvis IMRT might be preferable to standard techniques for its slightly superior PTV coverage.« less
  • Purpose: To study the impact on nodal coverage and dose to fixed organs at risk when using daily fiducial localization of the prostate to deliver intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Five patients with prostate cancer in whom prostate and pelvic nodes were irradiated with IMRT were studied. Dose was prescribed such that 95% of the prostate planning target volume (PTV) and 90% of the nodal PTV were covered. Random and systematic prostate displacements in the anterior-posterior, superior-inferior, and left-right directions were simulated to shift the original isocenter of the IMRT plan. The composite dose during the course of treatmentmore » was calculated. Results: Compared with a static setup, simulating random shifts reduced dose by less than 1.5% for nodal hotspot (i.e., dose to 1 cm{sup 3}), by less than 1% for the 90% nodal PTV coverage, and by less than 0.5% for the nodal mean dose. Bowel and femoral head hotspots were reduced by less than 1.5% and 2%, respectively. A 10-mm systematic offset reduced nodal coverage by up to 10%. Conclusion: The use of prostate fiducials for daily localization during IMRT treatment results in negligible changes in dose coverage of pelvic nodes or normal tissue sparing in the absence of a significant systematic offset. This offers a simple and practical solution to the problem of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer when including pelvic nodes.« less