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Title: SU-F-P-39: End-To-End Validation of a 6 MV High Dose Rate Photon Beam, Configured for Eclipse AAA Algorithm Using Golden Beam Data, for SBRT Treatments Using RapidArc

Abstract

Purpose: To use end-to-end testing to validate a 6 MV high dose rate photon beam, configured for Eclipse AAA algorithm using Golden Beam Data (GBD), for SBRT treatments using RapidArc. Methods: Beam data was configured for Varian Eclipse AAA algorithm using the GBD provided by the vendor. Transverse and diagonals dose profiles, PDDs and output factors down to a field size of 2×2 cm2 were measured on a Varian Trilogy Linac and compared with GBD library using 2% 2mm 1D gamma analysis. The MLC transmission factor and dosimetric leaf gap were determined to characterize the MLC in Eclipse. Mechanical and dosimetric tests were performed combining different gantry rotation speeds, dose rates and leaf speeds to evaluate the delivery system performance according to VMAT accuracy requirements. An end-to-end test was implemented planning several SBRT RapidArc treatments on a CIRS 002LFC IMRT Thorax Phantom. The CT scanner calibration curve was acquired and loaded in Eclipse. PTW 31013 ionization chamber was used with Keithley 35617EBS electrometer for absolute point dose measurements in water and lung equivalent inserts. TPS calculated planar dose distributions were compared to those measured using EPID and MapCheck, as an independent verification method. Results were evaluated with gamma criteria ofmore » 2% dose difference and 2mm DTA for 95% of points. Results: GBD set vs. measured data passed 2% 2mm 1D gamma analysis even for small fields. Machine performance tests show results are independent of machine delivery configuration, as expected. Absolute point dosimetry comparison resulted within 4% for the worst case scenario in lung. Over 97% of the points evaluated in dose distributions passed gamma index analysis. Conclusion: Eclipse AAA algorithm configuration of the 6 MV high dose rate photon beam using GBD proved efficient. End-to-end test dose calculation results indicate it can be used clinically for SBRT using RapidArc.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Vidt Centro Medico, Ciudad Autonoma De Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aire (Argentina)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22626711
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ALGORITHMS; CHEST; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DIFFERENTIAL THERMAL ANALYSIS; DOSE RATES; ELECTROMETERS; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; LUNGS; PHANTOMS; PHOTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; VALIDATION

Citation Formats

Ferreyra, M, Salinas Aranda, F, Dodat, D, Sansogne, R, and Arbiser, S. SU-F-P-39: End-To-End Validation of a 6 MV High Dose Rate Photon Beam, Configured for Eclipse AAA Algorithm Using Golden Beam Data, for SBRT Treatments Using RapidArc. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955746.
Ferreyra, M, Salinas Aranda, F, Dodat, D, Sansogne, R, & Arbiser, S. SU-F-P-39: End-To-End Validation of a 6 MV High Dose Rate Photon Beam, Configured for Eclipse AAA Algorithm Using Golden Beam Data, for SBRT Treatments Using RapidArc. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955746.
Ferreyra, M, Salinas Aranda, F, Dodat, D, Sansogne, R, and Arbiser, S. 2016. "SU-F-P-39: End-To-End Validation of a 6 MV High Dose Rate Photon Beam, Configured for Eclipse AAA Algorithm Using Golden Beam Data, for SBRT Treatments Using RapidArc". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955746.
@article{osti_22626711,
title = {SU-F-P-39: End-To-End Validation of a 6 MV High Dose Rate Photon Beam, Configured for Eclipse AAA Algorithm Using Golden Beam Data, for SBRT Treatments Using RapidArc},
author = {Ferreyra, M and Salinas Aranda, F and Dodat, D and Sansogne, R and Arbiser, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To use end-to-end testing to validate a 6 MV high dose rate photon beam, configured for Eclipse AAA algorithm using Golden Beam Data (GBD), for SBRT treatments using RapidArc. Methods: Beam data was configured for Varian Eclipse AAA algorithm using the GBD provided by the vendor. Transverse and diagonals dose profiles, PDDs and output factors down to a field size of 2×2 cm2 were measured on a Varian Trilogy Linac and compared with GBD library using 2% 2mm 1D gamma analysis. The MLC transmission factor and dosimetric leaf gap were determined to characterize the MLC in Eclipse. Mechanical and dosimetric tests were performed combining different gantry rotation speeds, dose rates and leaf speeds to evaluate the delivery system performance according to VMAT accuracy requirements. An end-to-end test was implemented planning several SBRT RapidArc treatments on a CIRS 002LFC IMRT Thorax Phantom. The CT scanner calibration curve was acquired and loaded in Eclipse. PTW 31013 ionization chamber was used with Keithley 35617EBS electrometer for absolute point dose measurements in water and lung equivalent inserts. TPS calculated planar dose distributions were compared to those measured using EPID and MapCheck, as an independent verification method. Results were evaluated with gamma criteria of 2% dose difference and 2mm DTA for 95% of points. Results: GBD set vs. measured data passed 2% 2mm 1D gamma analysis even for small fields. Machine performance tests show results are independent of machine delivery configuration, as expected. Absolute point dosimetry comparison resulted within 4% for the worst case scenario in lung. Over 97% of the points evaluated in dose distributions passed gamma index analysis. Conclusion: Eclipse AAA algorithm configuration of the 6 MV high dose rate photon beam using GBD proved efficient. End-to-end test dose calculation results indicate it can be used clinically for SBRT using RapidArc.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955746},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To conduct a feasibility study on retrospective respiratory gating and marker tracking for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with a gated RapidArc delivery using a 6MV flattened filter free photon mode. Methods: A CIRS dynamic thorax phantom Model 008A with different inserts was used for treatment planning and respiratory gating. 4D CT had a free breathing simulation followed by a respiration gated, ten phased CT using a Philips Brilliance CT with a Varian RPM respiratory gating system. The internal target volume was created from the ten phase gated CT images, followed by exporting to a Varian Eclipse TPS v11more » for treatment planning on the free breath images. Both MIP and AIP were also generated for comparison of planning and target motion tracking. The planned dose was delivered with a 6MV FFF photon beam from a Varian TrueBeam accelerator. Gated target motion was also verified by tracking the implanted makers during delivery using continuous kV imaging in addition to CBCT, kV and MV localization and verification. Results: Gating was studied in three situations of lower, normal, and faster breathing at a respiratory cycle of 5, 15 and 25 breaths per minute, respectively. 4D treatment planning was performed at a normal breathing of 15 breaths per minute. The gated patterns obtained using the TrueBeam IR camera were compared with the planned ones while gating operation was added prior to delivery . Gating was realized only when the measured respiratory patterns matched to the planned ones. The gated target motion was verified within the tolerance by kV and MV imaging. Either free breathing CT or averaged CT images were studied to be good for image guidance to align the target. Conclusion: Gated RapidArc SBRT delivered with a 6MV FFF photon beam is realized using a dynamic lung phantom.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this work was to quantify the dosimetric impact of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation algorithm compared to Pencil Beam (PB) on Spine SBRT with HybridARC (HA) and sliding windows IMRT (dMLC) treatment modality. Methods: A 6MV beam (1000MU/min) produced by a Novalis TX (BrainLAB-Varian) equipped with HDMLC was used. HA uses 1 arc plus 8 IMRT beams (arc weight between 60–40%) and dIMRT 15 beams. Plans were calculated using iPlan v.4.5.3 (BrainLAB) and the treatment dose prescription was 27Gy in 3 fractions. Dose calculation was done by PB (4mm spatial resolution) with heterogeneity correction and MCmore » dose to water (4mm spatial resolution and 4% mean variance). PTV and spinal cord dose comparison were done. Study was done on 12 patients. IROC Spine Phantom was used to validate HA and quantify dose variation using PB and MC algorithm. Results: The difference between PB and MC for PTV D98%, D95%, Dmean, D2% were 2.6% [−5.1, 6.8], 0.1% [−4.2, 5.4], 0.9% [−1.5, 3.8] and 2.4% [−0.5, 8.3]. The difference between PB and MC for spinal cord Dmax, D1.2cc and D0.35cc were 5.3% [−6.4, 18.4], 9% [−7.0, 17.0] and 7.6% [−0.6, 14.8] respectively. IROC spine phantom shows PTV TLD dose variation of 0.98% for PB and 1.01% for MC. Axial and sagittal film plane gamma index (5%-3mm) was 95% and 97% for PB and 95% and 99% for MC. Conclusion: PB slightly underestimates the dose for the PTV. For the spinal cord PB underestimates the dose and dose differences could be as high as 18% which could have unexpected clinical impact. CI shows no variation between PB and MC for both treatment modalities Treatment modalities have no impact with the dose calculation algorithms used. Following the IROC pass-fail criteria, treatment acceptance requirement was fulfilled for PB and MC.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to determine if a single set of beam data, described by a minimal set of equations and fitting variables, can be used to commission different installations of a proton double-scattering system in a commercial pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm. Methods: The beam model parameters required to commission the pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm (virtual and effective SAD, effective source size, and pristine-peak energy spread) are determined for a commercial double-scattering system. These parameters are measured in a first room and parameterized as function of proton energy and nozzle settings by fitting four analytical equations tomore » the measured data. The combination of these equations and fitting values constitutes the golden beam data (GBD). To determine the variation in dose delivery between installations, the same dosimetric properties are measured in two additional rooms at the same facility, as well as in a single room at another facility. The difference between the room-specific measurements and the GBD is evaluated against tolerances that guarantee the 3D dose distribution in each of the rooms matches the GBD-based dose distribution within clinically reasonable limits. The pencil-beam treatment-planning algorithm is commissioned with the GBD. The three-dimensional dose distribution in water is evaluated in the four treatment rooms and compared to the treatment-planning calculated dose distribution. Results: The virtual and effective SAD measurements fall between 226 and 257 cm. The effective source size varies between 2.4 and 6.2 cm for the large-field options, and 1.0 and 2.0 cm for the small-field options. The pristine-peak energy spread decreases from 1.05% at the lowest range to 0.6% at the highest. The virtual SAD as well as the effective source size can be accurately described by a linear relationship as function of the inverse of the residual energy. An additional linear correction term as function of RM-step thickness is required for accurate parameterization of the effective SAD. The GBD energy spread is given by a linear function of the exponential of the beam energy. Except for a few outliers, the measured parameters match the GBD within the specified tolerances in all of the four rooms investigated. For a SOBP field with a range of 15 g/cm{sup 2} and an air gap of 25 cm, the maximum difference in the 80%–20% lateral penumbra between the GBD-commissioned treatment-planning system and measurements in any of the four rooms is 0.5 mm. Conclusions: The beam model parameters of the double-scattering system can be parameterized with a limited set of equations and parameters. This GBD closely matches the measured dosimetric properties in four different rooms.« less
  • Purpose: Radiation treatments are trending toward delivering higher doses per fraction under stereotactic radiosurgery and hypofractionated treatment regimens. There is a need for accurate 3D in vivo patient dose verification using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements. This work presents a model-based technique to compute full three-dimensional patient dose reconstructed from on-treatment EPID portal images (i.e., transmission images). Methods: EPID dose is converted to incident fluence entering the patient using a series of steps which include converting measured EPID dose to fluence at the detector plane and then back-projecting the primary source component of the EPID fluence upstream of themore » patient. Incident fluence is then recombined with predicted extra-focal fluence and used to calculate 3D patient dose via a collapsed-cone convolution method. This method is implemented in an iterative manner, although in practice it provides accurate results in a single iteration. The robustness of the dose reconstruction technique is demonstrated with several simple slab phantom and nine anthropomorphic phantom cases. Prostate, head and neck, and lung treatments are all included as well as a range of delivery techniques including VMAT and dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Results: Results indicate that the patient dose reconstruction algorithm compares well with treatment planning system computed doses for controlled test situations. For simple phantom and square field tests, agreement was excellent with a 2%/2 mm 3D chi pass rate ≥98.9%. On anthropomorphic phantoms, the 2%/2 mm 3D chi pass rates ranged from 79.9% to 99.9% in the planning target volume (PTV) region and 96.5% to 100% in the low dose region (>20% of prescription, excluding PTV and skin build-up region). Conclusions: An algorithm to reconstruct delivered patient 3D doses from EPID exit dosimetry measurements was presented. The method was applied to phantom and patient data sets, as well as for dynamic IMRT and VMAT delivery techniques. Results indicate that the EPID dose reconstruction algorithm presented in this work is suitable for clinical implementation.« less
  • Purpose: purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of grid size in Eclipse AcurosXB dose calculation algorithm for SBRT lung. Methods: Five cases of SBRT lung previously treated have been chosen for present study. Four of the plans were 5 fields conventional IMRT and one was Rapid Arc plan. All five cases have been calculated with five grid sizes (1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3mm) available for AXB algorithm with same plan normalization. Dosimetric indices relevant to SBRT along with MUs and time have been recorded for different grid sizes. The maximum difference was calculated as a percentagemore » of mean of all five values. All the plans were IMRT QAed with portal dosimetry. Results: The maximum difference of MUs was within 2%. The time increased was as high as 7 times from highest 3mm to lowest 1mm grid size. The largest difference of PTV minimum, maximum and mean dose were 7.7%, 1.5% and 1.6% respectively. The highest D2-Max difference was 6.1%. The highest difference in ipsilateral lung mean, V5Gy, V10Gy and V20Gy were 2.6%, 2.4%, 1.9% and 3.8% respectively. The maximum difference of heart, cord and esophagus dose were 6.5%, 7.8% and 4.02% respectively. The IMRT Gamma passing rate at 2%/2mm remains within 1.5% with at least 98% points passing with all grid sizes. Conclusion: This work indicates the lowest grid size of 1mm available in AXB is not necessarily required for accurate dose calculation. The IMRT passing rate was insignificant or not observed with the reduction of grid size less than 2mm. Although the maximum percentage difference of some of the dosimetric indices appear large, most of them are clinically insignificant in absolute dose values. So we conclude that 2mm grid size calculation is best compromise in light of dose calculation accuracy and time it takes to calculate dose.« less