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Title: SU-F-P-31: Dosimetric Effects of Roll and Pitch Corrections Using Robotic Table

Abstract

Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric effect of roll and pitch corrections being performed by two types of robotic tables available at our institution: BrainLabTM 5DOF robotic table installed at VERO (BrainLab&MHI) dedicated SBRT linear accelerator and 6DOF robotic couch by IBA Proton Therapy with QFixTM couch top. Methods: Planning study used a thorax phantom (CIRSTM), scanned at 4DCT protocol; targets (IGTV, PTV) were determined according to the institutional lung site-specific standards. 12 CT sets were generated with Pitch and Roll angles ranging from −4 to +4 degrees each. 2 table tops were placed onto the scans according to the modality-specific patient treatment workflows. The pitched/rolled CT sets were fused to the original CT scan and the verification treatment plans were generated (12 photon SBRT plans and 12 proton conventional fractionation lung plans). Then the CT sets were fused again to simulate the effect of patient roll/pitch corrections by the robotic table. DVH sets were evaluated for all cases. Results: The effect of not correcting the phantom position for roll/pitch in photon SBRT cases was reducing the target coverage by 2% as maximum; correcting the positional errors by robotic table varied the target coverage within 0.7%. in case of proton treatment,more » not correcting the phantom position led to the coverage loss up to 4%, applying the corrections using robotic table reduced the coverage variation to less than 2% for PTV and within 1% for IGTV. Conclusion: correcting the patient position by using robotic tables is highly preferable, despite the small dosimetric changes introduced by the devices.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624470
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; CHEST; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRECTIONS; FRACTIONATION; IMAGE PROCESSING; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; LUNGS; PATIENTS; PHANTOMS; PROTON BEAMS; RADIOTHERAPY; VERIFICATION

Citation Formats

Mamalui, M, Su, Z, Flampouri, S, and Li, Z. SU-F-P-31: Dosimetric Effects of Roll and Pitch Corrections Using Robotic Table. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955738.
Mamalui, M, Su, Z, Flampouri, S, & Li, Z. SU-F-P-31: Dosimetric Effects of Roll and Pitch Corrections Using Robotic Table. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955738.
Mamalui, M, Su, Z, Flampouri, S, and Li, Z. Wed . "SU-F-P-31: Dosimetric Effects of Roll and Pitch Corrections Using Robotic Table". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955738.
@article{osti_22624470,
title = {SU-F-P-31: Dosimetric Effects of Roll and Pitch Corrections Using Robotic Table},
author = {Mamalui, M and Su, Z and Flampouri, S and Li, Z},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric effect of roll and pitch corrections being performed by two types of robotic tables available at our institution: BrainLabTM 5DOF robotic table installed at VERO (BrainLab&MHI) dedicated SBRT linear accelerator and 6DOF robotic couch by IBA Proton Therapy with QFixTM couch top. Methods: Planning study used a thorax phantom (CIRSTM), scanned at 4DCT protocol; targets (IGTV, PTV) were determined according to the institutional lung site-specific standards. 12 CT sets were generated with Pitch and Roll angles ranging from −4 to +4 degrees each. 2 table tops were placed onto the scans according to the modality-specific patient treatment workflows. The pitched/rolled CT sets were fused to the original CT scan and the verification treatment plans were generated (12 photon SBRT plans and 12 proton conventional fractionation lung plans). Then the CT sets were fused again to simulate the effect of patient roll/pitch corrections by the robotic table. DVH sets were evaluated for all cases. Results: The effect of not correcting the phantom position for roll/pitch in photon SBRT cases was reducing the target coverage by 2% as maximum; correcting the positional errors by robotic table varied the target coverage within 0.7%. in case of proton treatment, not correcting the phantom position led to the coverage loss up to 4%, applying the corrections using robotic table reduced the coverage variation to less than 2% for PTV and within 1% for IGTV. Conclusion: correcting the patient position by using robotic tables is highly preferable, despite the small dosimetric changes introduced by the devices.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955738},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: The portability of Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (EBx) System has made it a viable option for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) treatment of early-stage breast cancer. The low energy (50kVp) of the X-ray source makes the shielding easy, but also means its dose distribution is sensitive to the medium’s composition. Current treatment planning systems (TPS) typically assume homogenous water for brachytherapy dose calculations, including the pre-calculated atlas plans for the Xoft IORT cases. However, Xoft recommends using saline to fill the balloon applicator. This study investigates the dosimetric difference due to the increased effective atomic number (Zeff) from water (7.42)more » to saline (7.56). Methods: The diameter of the balloon applicators ranges from 3–6cm, with 4cm being most frequently used. For the 4-cm and 6-cm diameter applicators, MCNP Monte Carlo program was used to calculate the dose at the surface (Ds) of the middle section of the balloon and 1 cm away (D1cm) for water- and saline-filled balloons: one plan with a single dwell at the center and another with multiple dwells as in the atlas plans. The single dwell plan is a simple estimation of the dosimetry, while the atlas plan is representative of the actual dose distribution. Results: The single-dwell plan showed a 5.1% and 6.1% decrease in Ds for the 4- and 6-cm applicators, respectively, due to the saline. The atlas plan showed similar Results: 4.8% and 6.4% decrease, respectively. The decrease in D1cm is 4.3%–5.2% and 3.3%–5.3s% in the single-dwell and atlas plans, respectively, for the 4- and 6-cm applicator. Conclusion: The dosimetric effect introduced by saline is on the order of 5%. This effect should be taken into account during both treatment planning and patient outcome studies.« less
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