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Title: SU-D-209-04: Raise Your Table: An Effective Way to Reduce Radiation Dose for Fluoroscopy

Abstract

Purpose: Patient table height plays an important role in estimating patient skin dose for interventional radiology (IR) procedures, because the patient’s skin location is dependent on the height of table. Variation in table height can lead to as much as 150% difference in skin dose for patient exams with similar air kerma meter readings. In our facility, IR procedural workflow was recently changed to require the IR physicians to confirm the patient table height before the procedure. The patient table height data was collected before and after this workflow change to validate the implementation of this practice. Methods: Table height information was analyzed for all procedures performed in three IR rooms, which were impacted by the workflow change, covering three months before and after the change (Aug 2015 to Jan 2016). In total, 442, 425, and 390 procedures were performed in these three rooms over this time period. There were no personnel or procedure assignment changes during the six-month period of time. Statistical analysis was performed for the average table height changes before and after the workflow change. Results: For the three IR rooms investigated, after the workflow change, the average table heights were increased by 1.43 cm (p=0.004084), 0.66more » cm (p=0.187089), and 1.59 cm (p=0.002193), providing a corresponding estimated skin dose savings of 6.76%, 2.94% and 7.62%, respectively. After the workflow change, the average table height was increased by 0.95 cm, 0.63 cm, 0.55 cm, 1.07 cm, 1.12 cm, and 3.36 cm for the six physicians who routinely work in these three rooms. Conclusion: Consistent improvement in table height settings has been observed for all IR rooms and all physicians following a simple workflow change. This change has led to significant patient dose savings by making physicians aware of the pre-procedure table position.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624409
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; FLUOROSCOPY; HEIGHT; KERMA; PATIENTS; PERSONNEL; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOMETERS; SKIN

Citation Formats

Huo, D, Hoerner, M, Toskich, B, and Rill, L. SU-D-209-04: Raise Your Table: An Effective Way to Reduce Radiation Dose for Fluoroscopy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955665.
Huo, D, Hoerner, M, Toskich, B, & Rill, L. SU-D-209-04: Raise Your Table: An Effective Way to Reduce Radiation Dose for Fluoroscopy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955665.
Huo, D, Hoerner, M, Toskich, B, and Rill, L. Wed . "SU-D-209-04: Raise Your Table: An Effective Way to Reduce Radiation Dose for Fluoroscopy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955665.
@article{osti_22624409,
title = {SU-D-209-04: Raise Your Table: An Effective Way to Reduce Radiation Dose for Fluoroscopy},
author = {Huo, D and Hoerner, M and Toskich, B and Rill, L},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Patient table height plays an important role in estimating patient skin dose for interventional radiology (IR) procedures, because the patient’s skin location is dependent on the height of table. Variation in table height can lead to as much as 150% difference in skin dose for patient exams with similar air kerma meter readings. In our facility, IR procedural workflow was recently changed to require the IR physicians to confirm the patient table height before the procedure. The patient table height data was collected before and after this workflow change to validate the implementation of this practice. Methods: Table height information was analyzed for all procedures performed in three IR rooms, which were impacted by the workflow change, covering three months before and after the change (Aug 2015 to Jan 2016). In total, 442, 425, and 390 procedures were performed in these three rooms over this time period. There were no personnel or procedure assignment changes during the six-month period of time. Statistical analysis was performed for the average table height changes before and after the workflow change. Results: For the three IR rooms investigated, after the workflow change, the average table heights were increased by 1.43 cm (p=0.004084), 0.66 cm (p=0.187089), and 1.59 cm (p=0.002193), providing a corresponding estimated skin dose savings of 6.76%, 2.94% and 7.62%, respectively. After the workflow change, the average table height was increased by 0.95 cm, 0.63 cm, 0.55 cm, 1.07 cm, 1.12 cm, and 3.36 cm for the six physicians who routinely work in these three rooms. Conclusion: Consistent improvement in table height settings has been observed for all IR rooms and all physicians following a simple workflow change. This change has led to significant patient dose savings by making physicians aware of the pre-procedure table position.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955665},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}