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Title: SU-D-209-04: Raise Your Table: An Effective Way to Reduce Radiation Dose for Fluoroscopy

Abstract

Purpose: Patient table height plays an important role in estimating patient skin dose for interventional radiology (IR) procedures, because the patient’s skin location is dependent on the height of table. Variation in table height can lead to as much as 150% difference in skin dose for patient exams with similar air kerma meter readings. In our facility, IR procedural workflow was recently changed to require the IR physicians to confirm the patient table height before the procedure. The patient table height data was collected before and after this workflow change to validate the implementation of this practice. Methods: Table height information was analyzed for all procedures performed in three IR rooms, which were impacted by the workflow change, covering three months before and after the change (Aug 2015 to Jan 2016). In total, 442, 425, and 390 procedures were performed in these three rooms over this time period. There were no personnel or procedure assignment changes during the six-month period of time. Statistical analysis was performed for the average table height changes before and after the workflow change. Results: For the three IR rooms investigated, after the workflow change, the average table heights were increased by 1.43 cm (p=0.004084), 0.66more » cm (p=0.187089), and 1.59 cm (p=0.002193), providing a corresponding estimated skin dose savings of 6.76%, 2.94% and 7.62%, respectively. After the workflow change, the average table height was increased by 0.95 cm, 0.63 cm, 0.55 cm, 1.07 cm, 1.12 cm, and 3.36 cm for the six physicians who routinely work in these three rooms. Conclusion: Consistent improvement in table height settings has been observed for all IR rooms and all physicians following a simple workflow change. This change has led to significant patient dose savings by making physicians aware of the pre-procedure table position.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624409
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; FLUOROSCOPY; HEIGHT; KERMA; PATIENTS; PERSONNEL; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOMETERS; SKIN

Citation Formats

Huo, D, Hoerner, M, Toskich, B, and Rill, L. SU-D-209-04: Raise Your Table: An Effective Way to Reduce Radiation Dose for Fluoroscopy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955665.
Huo, D, Hoerner, M, Toskich, B, & Rill, L. SU-D-209-04: Raise Your Table: An Effective Way to Reduce Radiation Dose for Fluoroscopy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955665.
Huo, D, Hoerner, M, Toskich, B, and Rill, L. Wed . "SU-D-209-04: Raise Your Table: An Effective Way to Reduce Radiation Dose for Fluoroscopy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955665.
@article{osti_22624409,
title = {SU-D-209-04: Raise Your Table: An Effective Way to Reduce Radiation Dose for Fluoroscopy},
author = {Huo, D and Hoerner, M and Toskich, B and Rill, L},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Patient table height plays an important role in estimating patient skin dose for interventional radiology (IR) procedures, because the patient’s skin location is dependent on the height of table. Variation in table height can lead to as much as 150% difference in skin dose for patient exams with similar air kerma meter readings. In our facility, IR procedural workflow was recently changed to require the IR physicians to confirm the patient table height before the procedure. The patient table height data was collected before and after this workflow change to validate the implementation of this practice. Methods: Table height information was analyzed for all procedures performed in three IR rooms, which were impacted by the workflow change, covering three months before and after the change (Aug 2015 to Jan 2016). In total, 442, 425, and 390 procedures were performed in these three rooms over this time period. There were no personnel or procedure assignment changes during the six-month period of time. Statistical analysis was performed for the average table height changes before and after the workflow change. Results: For the three IR rooms investigated, after the workflow change, the average table heights were increased by 1.43 cm (p=0.004084), 0.66 cm (p=0.187089), and 1.59 cm (p=0.002193), providing a corresponding estimated skin dose savings of 6.76%, 2.94% and 7.62%, respectively. After the workflow change, the average table height was increased by 0.95 cm, 0.63 cm, 0.55 cm, 1.07 cm, 1.12 cm, and 3.36 cm for the six physicians who routinely work in these three rooms. Conclusion: Consistent improvement in table height settings has been observed for all IR rooms and all physicians following a simple workflow change. This change has led to significant patient dose savings by making physicians aware of the pre-procedure table position.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955665},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the sensitivity of the Diagnostic Radiological Index of Protection (DRIP) to procedural factors in fluoroscopy in an effort to determine an appropriate set of scatter-mimicking primary beams (SMPB) to be used in measuring the DRIP. Methods: A series of clinical and factorial Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to determine the shape of the scattered X-ray spectra incident on the operator in different clinical fluoroscopy scenarios. Two clinical evaluations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle and patient size while technical factors were varied according to measured automatic dose rate control (ADRC) data. Factorial evaluationsmore » studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle, field of view, patient size and beam quality for constant technical factors. Average energy was the figure of merit used to condense fluence in each energy bin to a single numerical index. Results: Beam quality had the strongest influence on the scattered spectrum in fluoroscopy. Many procedural factors affected the scattered spectrum indirectly through their effects on primary beam quality through ADRC, e.g., gantry angle and patient size. Lateral C-arm rotation, common in interventional cardiology, increased the energy of the scattered spectrum, regardless of the direction of rotation. The effect of patient size on scattered radiation depended on ADRC characteristics, patient size, and procedure type. Conclusion: The scattered spectrum striking the operator in fluoroscopy, and therefore the DRIP, is most strongly influenced by primary beam quality, particularly kV. Use cases for protective garments should be classified by typical procedural primary beam qualities, which are governed by the ADRC according to the impacts of patient size, anatomical location, and gantry angle. These results will help determine an appropriate set of SMPB to be used for measuring the DRIP.« less
  • Purpose: To determine contributions to skin dose due to scatter from the table and head holder used during fluoroscopy, and also to explore alternative design material to reduce the scatter dose. Methods: Measurements were made of the primary and scatter components of the xray beam exiting the patient table and a cylindrical head holder used on a Toshiba Infinix c-arm unit as a function of kVp for the various beam filters on the machine and for various field sizes. The primary component of the beam was measured in air with the object placed close to the x-ray tube with anmore » air gap between it and a 6 cc parallel-plate ionization chamber and with the beam collimated to a size just larger than the chamber. The primary plus scatter radiation components were measured with the object moved to a position in the beam next to the chamber for larger field sizes. Both sets of measurements were preformed while keeping the source-to-chamber distance fixed. The scatter fraction was estimated by taking the ratio of the difference between the two measurements and the reading that included both primary and scatter. Similar measurements were also made for a 2.3 cm thick Styrofoam block which could substitute for the patient support. Results: The measured scatter fractions indicate that the patient table as well as the head holder contributes an additional 10–16% to the patient entrance dose depending on field size. Forward scatter was reduced with the Styrofoam block so that the scatter fraction was about 4–5%. Conclusion: The results of this investigation demonstrated that scatter from the table and head holder used in clinical fluoroscopy contribute substantially to the skin dose. The lower contribution of scatter from Styrofoam suggests that there is an opportunity to redesign patient support accessories to reduce the skin dose. Partial support from NIH grant R01EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation Equipment Grant.« less
  • Purpose: To characterize changes in radiation dose after introducing a new real-time image processing technology in interventional radiology systems. Methods: Interventional radiology (IR) procedures are increasingly complex, at times requiring substantial time and radiation dose. The risk of inducing tissue reactions as well as long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced cancer is not trivial. To reduce this risk, IR systems are increasingly equipped with dose reduction technologies.Recently, ClarityIQ (Philips Healthcare) technology was installed in our existing neuroradiology IR (NIR) and vascular IR (VIR) suites respectively. ClarityIQ includes real-time image processing that reduces noise/artifacts, enhances images, and sharpens edges while alsomore » reducing radiation dose rates. We reviewed 412 NIR (175 pre- and 237 post-ClarityIQ) procedures and 329 VIR (156 preand 173 post-ClarityIQ) procedures performed at our institution pre- and post-ClarityIQ implementation. NIR procedures were primarily classified as interventional or diagnostic. VIR procedures included drain port, drain placement, tube change, mesenteric, and implanted venous procedures. Air Kerma (AK in units of mGy) was documented for all the cases using a commercial radiation exposure management system. Results: When considering all NIR procedures, median AK decreased from 1194 mGy to 561 mGy. When considering all VIR procedures, median AK decreased from 49 to 14 mGy. Both NIR and VIR exhibited a decrease in AK exceeding 50% after ClarityIQ implementation, a statistically significant (p<0.05) difference. Of the 5 most common VIR procedures, all median AK values decreased, but significance (p<0.05) was only reached in venous access (N=53), angio mesenteric (N=41), and drain placement procedures (N=31). Conclusion: ClarityIQ can reduce dose significantly for both NIR and VIR procedures. Image quality was not assessed in conjunction with the dose reduction.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship between indirect dose metrics and PSD could be established for fluoroscopically-guided interventional cardiology procedures. Methods: PSD were measured directly using XR-RV3 radiochromic film for 94 consecutive fluoroscopically guided interventional cardiology procedures performed at two sites. Procedures were both diagnostic and therapeutic in nature. Radiation dose structured reports (RDSR) were collected for each procedure and used to calculate indirect estimates of PSD which were compared to the measured PSD. Reference air kerma (Ka,r) was also compared to the measured PSD. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was calculated for each metric andmore » metrics were compared to measured PSD using a two-tailed t-test. Data were log transformed prior to statistical analysis. Results: Both Ka,r and the calculated PSD were closely correlated with measured PSD at each sites (Ka,r: 0.92 and 0.86, indirect PSD: 0.91 and 0.88). At one site, neither Ka,r nor indirect PSD was significantly different from the measured PSD (p = 0.22 and p=0.054, respectively), while at the second site both Ka,r and indirect PSD were significantly higher than measured PSD (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). In almost all cases, both Ka,r and indirect PSD overestimated the true PSD. Conclusions: The use of a range of gantry angles and table positions, along with variation in procedural imaging requirements, limits the utility of indirect dose metrics for predicting PSD for interventional cardiology procedures. A. Kyle Jones and Alexander S. Pasciak are owners of Fluoroscopic Safety, LLC.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the absolute dose accuracy of the PTW Octavius 729 XDR 2D ion chamber array at a high dose rate pencil beam scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: A set of 18 plans were created in our treatment planning system, each of which comprising a unique combination of field sizes (FS), length of spread out of Bragg peaks (SOBP) and depths. The parameters used were: FS of 5×5cm{sup 2}, 10×10cm{sup 2} and 15×15cm{sup 2}; flat SOBP of 5cm and 10cm; and isocenter depths of 10cm, 15cm and 20cm, which coincides with the center of the SOBP. The 2D arraymore » detector was positioned at the machine isocenter and the appropriate amount of solid water was used to match the planned depths of 10, 15 and 20 cm water equivalent depth. Subsequently, we measured the absolute dose at isocenter using a CC04 ion chamber in a 1D water tank. Both 2D array and CC04 were previously cross calibrated. We also collected the MU rates used by our proton machine from the log files. Results: The relative differences between the CC04 and the 2D array can be summarized into two groups, one with 5 cm SOBP and another with 10 cm SOBP. Plotting these datasets against FS shows that the 2D array response for high dose rate fields (FS of 5×5cm{sup 2} and 5cm SOBP) can be up to 2% lower. Similarly, plotting them against isocenter depths reveals the detector's response can be up to 2% lower for higher energy beams (about 200MeV nominal). The MU rate found in the machine log files for 5cm SOBP's were as high as twice the MU rate for the 10cm SOBP. Conclusion: The 2D array dose response showed a dose rate effect in scanning pencil beam delivery, which needs to be corrected to achieve a better dose accuracy.« less