skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-D-206-07: CBCT Scatter Correction Based On Rotating Collimator

Abstract

Purpose: Scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has obvious effect on the removal of image noise, the cup artifact and the increase of image contrast. Several methods using a beam blocker for the estimation and subtraction of scatter have been proposed. However, the inconvenience of mechanics and propensity to residual artifacts limited the further evolution of basic and clinical research. Here, we propose a rotating collimator-based approach, in conjunction with reconstruction based on a discrete Radon transform and Tchebichef moments algorithm, to correct scatter-induced artifacts. Methods: A rotating-collimator, comprising round tungsten alloy strips, was mounted on a linear actuator. The rotating-collimator is divided into 6 portions equally. The round strips space is evenly spaced on each portion but staggered between different portions. A step motor connected to the rotating collimator drove the blocker to around x-ray source during the CBCT acquisition. The CBCT reconstruction based on a discrete Radon transform and Tchebichef moments algorithm is performed. Experimental studies using water phantom and Catphan504 were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme. Results: The proposed algorithm was tested on both the Monte Carlo simulation and actual experiments with the Catphan504 phantom. From the simulation result, the meanmore » square error of the reconstruction error decreases from 16% to 1.18%, the cupping (τcup) from 14.005% to 0.66%, and the peak signal-to-noise ratio increase from 16.9594 to 31.45. From the actual experiments, the induced visual artifacts are significantly reduced. Conclusion: We conducted an experiment on CBCT imaging system with a rotating collimator to develop and optimize x-ray scatter control and reduction technique. The proposed method is attractive in applications where a high CBCT image quality is critical, for example, dose calculation in adaptive radiation therapy. We want to thank Dr. Lei Xing and Dr. Yong Yang in the Stanford University School of Medicine for this work. This work was jointly supported by NSFC (61471226), Natural Science Foundation for Distinguished Young Scholars of Shandong Province (JQ201516), and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2015T80739, 2014M551949).« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong (China)
  2. Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, China, Jinan, Shandong (China)
  3. Zhang Jiagang STFK Medical Device Co, Zhangjiangkang, Suzhou (China)
  4. Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, Shandong provice (China)
  5. Shandong Province Key Laboratory of Medical Physics and Image Processing Te, Ji’nan, Shandong province (China)
  6. School of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624405
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ALGORITHMS; BEAMS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COLLIMATORS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRECTIONS; ERRORS; IMAGES; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PHANTOMS; RADIOTHERAPY; RADON; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; TUNGSTEN; TUNGSTEN ALLOYS; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Yu, G, Feng, Z, Yin, Y, Qiang, L, Li, B, Huang, P, and Li, D. SU-D-206-07: CBCT Scatter Correction Based On Rotating Collimator. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955661.
Yu, G, Feng, Z, Yin, Y, Qiang, L, Li, B, Huang, P, & Li, D. SU-D-206-07: CBCT Scatter Correction Based On Rotating Collimator. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955661.
Yu, G, Feng, Z, Yin, Y, Qiang, L, Li, B, Huang, P, and Li, D. Wed . "SU-D-206-07: CBCT Scatter Correction Based On Rotating Collimator". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955661.
@article{osti_22624405,
title = {SU-D-206-07: CBCT Scatter Correction Based On Rotating Collimator},
author = {Yu, G and Feng, Z and Yin, Y and Qiang, L and Li, B and Huang, P and Li, D},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has obvious effect on the removal of image noise, the cup artifact and the increase of image contrast. Several methods using a beam blocker for the estimation and subtraction of scatter have been proposed. However, the inconvenience of mechanics and propensity to residual artifacts limited the further evolution of basic and clinical research. Here, we propose a rotating collimator-based approach, in conjunction with reconstruction based on a discrete Radon transform and Tchebichef moments algorithm, to correct scatter-induced artifacts. Methods: A rotating-collimator, comprising round tungsten alloy strips, was mounted on a linear actuator. The rotating-collimator is divided into 6 portions equally. The round strips space is evenly spaced on each portion but staggered between different portions. A step motor connected to the rotating collimator drove the blocker to around x-ray source during the CBCT acquisition. The CBCT reconstruction based on a discrete Radon transform and Tchebichef moments algorithm is performed. Experimental studies using water phantom and Catphan504 were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme. Results: The proposed algorithm was tested on both the Monte Carlo simulation and actual experiments with the Catphan504 phantom. From the simulation result, the mean square error of the reconstruction error decreases from 16% to 1.18%, the cupping (τcup) from 14.005% to 0.66%, and the peak signal-to-noise ratio increase from 16.9594 to 31.45. From the actual experiments, the induced visual artifacts are significantly reduced. Conclusion: We conducted an experiment on CBCT imaging system with a rotating collimator to develop and optimize x-ray scatter control and reduction technique. The proposed method is attractive in applications where a high CBCT image quality is critical, for example, dose calculation in adaptive radiation therapy. We want to thank Dr. Lei Xing and Dr. Yong Yang in the Stanford University School of Medicine for this work. This work was jointly supported by NSFC (61471226), Natural Science Foundation for Distinguished Young Scholars of Shandong Province (JQ201516), and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2015T80739, 2014M551949).},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955661},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To estimate and remove the scatter contamination in the acquired projection of cone-beam CT (CBCT), to suppress the shading artifacts and improve the image quality without prior information. Methods: The uncorrected CBCT images containing shading artifacts are reconstructed by applying the standard FDK algorithm on CBCT raw projections. The uncorrected image is then segmented to generate an initial template image. To estimate scatter signal, the differences are calculated by subtracting the simulated projections of the template image from the raw projections. Since scatter signals are dominantly continuous and low-frequency in the projection domain, they are estimated by low-pass filteringmore » the difference signals and subtracted from the raw CBCT projections to achieve the scatter correction. Finally, the corrected CBCT image is reconstructed from the corrected projection data. Since an accurate template image is not readily segmented from the uncorrected CBCT image, the proposed scheme is iterated until the produced template is not altered. Results: The proposed scheme is evaluated on the Catphan©600 phantom data and CBCT images acquired from a pelvis patient. The result shows that shading artifacts have been effectively suppressed by the proposed method. Using multi-detector CT (MDCT) images as reference, quantitative analysis is operated to measure the quality of corrected images. Compared to images without correction, the method proposed reduces the overall CT number error from over 200 HU to be less than 50 HU and can increase the spatial uniformity. Conclusion: An iterative strategy without relying on the prior information is proposed in this work to remove the shading artifacts due to scatter contamination in the projection domain. The method is evaluated in phantom and patient studies and the result shows that the image quality is remarkably improved. The proposed method is efficient and practical to address the poor image quality issue of CBCT images. This work is supported by the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. LR16F010001), National High-tech R&D Program for Young Scientists by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2015AA020917).« less
  • Purpose: A moving blocker based strategy has shown promising results for scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Different parameters of the system design affect its performance in scatter estimation and image reconstruction accuracy. The goal of this work is to optimize the geometric design of the moving block system. Methods: In the moving blocker system, a blocker consisting of lead strips is inserted between the x-ray source and imaging object and moving back and forth along rotation axis during CBCT acquisition. CT image of an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was used in the simulation study. Scatter signal was simulated bymore » Monte Carlo calculation with various combinations of the lead strip width and the gap between neighboring lead strips, ranging from 4 mm to 80 mm (projected at the detector plane). Scatter signal in the unblocked region was estimated by cubic B-spline interpolation from the blocked region. Scatter estimation accuracy was quantified as relative root mean squared error by comparing the interpolated scatter to the Monte Carlo simulated scatter. CBCT was reconstructed by total variation minimization from the unblocked region, under various combinations of the lead strip width and gap. Reconstruction accuracy in each condition is quantified by CT number error as comparing to a CBCT reconstructed from unblocked full projection data. Results: Scatter estimation error varied from 0.5% to 2.6% as the lead strip width and the gap varied from 4mm to 80mm. CT number error in the reconstructed CBCT images varied from 12 to 44. Highest reconstruction accuracy is achieved when the blocker lead strip width is 8 mm and the gap is 48 mm. Conclusions: Accurate scatter estimation can be achieved in large range of combinations of lead strip width and gap. However, image reconstruction accuracy is greatly affected by the geometry design of the blocker.« less
  • Purpose: Cone-beam CTs (CBCT) obtained from On-Board Imaging Devices (OBI) are increasingly being used for dose calculation purposes in adaptive radiotherapy. Patient and target morphology are monitored and the treatment plan is updated using CBCT. Due to the difference in image acquisition parameters, dose calculated in a CBCT can differ from planned dose. We evaluate the difference between dose calculation in kV CBCT and simulation CT, and the effect of HU-density tables in dose discrepancies Methods: HU values for various materials were obtained using a Catphan 504 phantom for a simulator CT (CTSIM) and two different OBI systems using threemore » imaging protocols: Head, Thorax and Pelvis. HU-density tables were created in the TPS for each OBI image protocol. Treatment plans were made on each Catphan 504 dataset and on the head, thorax and pelvis sections of an anthropomorphic phantom, with and without the respective HU-density table. DVH information was compared among OBI systems and planning CT. Results: Dose calculations carried on the Catphan 504 CBCTs, with and without the respective CT-density table, had a maximum difference of −0.65% from the values on the planning CT. The use of the respective HU-density table decreased the percent differences from planned values by half in most of the protocols. For the anthropomorphic phantom datasets, the use of the correct HU-density table reduced differences by 0.89% on OBI1 and 0.59% on OBI2 for the head, 0.49% on OBI1 for the thorax, and 0.25% on OBI2 for the pelvis. Differences from planned values without HU-density correction ranged from 3.13% (OBI1, thorax) to 0.30% (OBI2, thorax). Conclusion: CT-density tables in the TPS yield acceptable differences when used in partly homogeneous medium. Further corrections are needed when the medium contains pronounced density differences for accurate CBCT calculation. Current difference range (1–3%) can be clinically acceptable.« less
  • Purpose: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is on increasing demand for high-performance image-guided radiotherapy such as online tumor delineation and dose calculation. However, the current CBCT imaging has severe scatter artifacts and its current clinical application is therefore limited to patient setup based mainly on the bony structures. This study’s purpose is to develop a CBCT artifact correction method. Methods: The proposed scatter correction method utilizes the planning CT to improve CBCT image quality. First, an image registration is used to match the planning CT with the CBCT to reduce the geometry difference between the two images. Then, themore » planning CT-based prior information is entered into the Bayesian deconvolution framework to iteratively perform a scatter artifact correction for the CBCT mages. This technique was evaluated using Catphan phantoms with multiple inserts. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), and the image spatial nonuniformity (ISN) in selected volume of interests (VOIs) were calculated to assess the proposed correction method. Results: Post scatter correction, the CNR increased by a factor of 1.96, 3.22, 3.20, 3.46, 3.44, 1.97 and 1.65, and the SNR increased by a factor 1.05, 2.09, 1.71, 3.95, 2.52, 1.54 and 1.84 for the Air, PMP, LDPE, Polystryrene, Acrylic, Delrin and Teflon inserts, respectively. The ISN decreased from 21.1% to 4.7% in the corrected images. All values of CNR, SNR and ISN in the corrected CBCT image were much closer to those in the planning CT images. The results demonstrated that the proposed method reduces the relevant artifacts and recovers CT numbers. Conclusion: We have developed a novel CBCT artifact correction method based on CT image, and demonstrated that the proposed CT-guided correction method could significantly reduce scatter artifacts and improve the image quality. This method has great potential to correct CBCT images allowing its use in adaptive radiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: To further reduce CT dose, a practical sparse-view acquisition scheme is proposed to provide the same attenuation estimation as higher dose for PET imaging in the extended scan field-of-view. Methods: CT scans are often used for PET attenuation correction and can be acquired at very low CT radiation dose. Low dose techniques often employ low tube voltage/current accompanied with a smooth filter before backprojection to reduce CT image noise. These techniques can introduce bias in the conversion from HU to attenuation values, especially in the extended CT scan field-of-view (FOV). In this work, we propose an ultra-low dose CTmore » technique for PET attenuation correction based on sparse-view acquisition. That is, instead of an acquisition of full amount of views, only a fraction of views are acquired. We tested this technique on a 64-slice GE CT scanner using multiple phantoms. CT scan FOV truncation completion was performed based on the published water-cylinder extrapolation algorithm. A number of continuous views per rotation: 984 (full), 246, 123, 82 and 62 have been tested, corresponding to a CT dose reduction of none, 4x, 8x, 12x and 16x. We also simulated sparse-view acquisition by skipping views from the fully-acquired view data. Results: FBP reconstruction with Q. AC filter on reduced views in the full extended scan field-of-view possesses similar image quality to the reconstruction on acquired full view data. The results showed a further potential for dose reduction compared to the full acquisition, without sacrificing any significant attenuation support to the PET. Conclusion: With the proposed sparse-view method, one can potential achieve at least 2x more CT dose reduction compared to the current Ultra-Low Dose (ULD) PET/CT protocol. A pre-scan based dose modulation scheme can be combined with the above sparse-view approaches, which can even further reduce the CT scan dose during a PET/CT exam.« less