skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-D-BRA-07: Applications of Combined KV/MV CBCT Imaging with a High-DQE MV Detector

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate whether a high detection quantum efficiency (DQE) MV detector makes combined kV/MV CBCT clinically practical. Methods: Combined kV/MV CBCT was studied for scan time reduction (STR) and metal artifact reduction (MAR). 6MV CBCT data (dose rate = 0.017 MU/degree) were collected using 1) a novel focused pixelated cadmium tungstate (CWO) scintillator (15mm thickness, DQE(0) = 22%, 0.784mm pixel pitch) coupled to a flat panel imager, and 2) a commercial portal imager with a 133mg/cm{sup 2} gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS) screen (DQE(0) = 1.2%). The 100kVp data were acquired using a commercial imager employing a columnar cesium iodide scintillator (DQE(0) = 70%) with a dose rate of 0.0016 cGy/degree. For STR, MV and kV projections spanning 105° were combined to constitute a complete CBCT scan. Total dose was ∼2cGy and acquisition time was 18s. For MAR, only the metalcorrupted pixels in the kV projections were replaced with MV data resulting in a total dose of less than 1cGy for a 360° scan. Image quality was assessed using an 18-cm diameter electron density phantom with nine tissue inserts, some of which were replaced with steel rods for MAR studies. Results: The CWO contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was ∼4.0x higher than themore » GOS CNR and was ∼4.8x lower than the kV CNR when normalized for dose. When CWO MV data were combined with kV data for STR, all contrast inserts were visible, but only two were detectable in the composite kV/GOS image. Metal artifacts were greatly reduced using the kV/MV MAR technique with all contrast inserts clearly visible in the composite kV/CWO image but only two inserts visible in the composite kV/GOS image. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a high DQE MV detector significantly improves kV/MV CBCT image quality thus enabling scan time reduction and metal artifact reduction without a severe dose penalty. AW and JS-L are employees of Varian, RF is an employee of Siemens.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2]; ; ;  [3];  [4]
  1. University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Australia)
  2. Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)
  3. Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)
  4. Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624387
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CADMIUM; CESIUM; CESIUM IODIDES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DOSE RATES; ELECTRON DENSITY; GADOLINIUM; IMAGES; PHANTOMS; THICKNESS; TUNGSTATES

Citation Formats

Bazalova-Carter, M, Newson, M, Wang, A, Star-Lack, J, Wu, M, Xing, L, Fahrig, R, and Ansbacher, W. SU-D-BRA-07: Applications of Combined KV/MV CBCT Imaging with a High-DQE MV Detector. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955640.
Bazalova-Carter, M, Newson, M, Wang, A, Star-Lack, J, Wu, M, Xing, L, Fahrig, R, & Ansbacher, W. SU-D-BRA-07: Applications of Combined KV/MV CBCT Imaging with a High-DQE MV Detector. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955640.
Bazalova-Carter, M, Newson, M, Wang, A, Star-Lack, J, Wu, M, Xing, L, Fahrig, R, and Ansbacher, W. 2016. "SU-D-BRA-07: Applications of Combined KV/MV CBCT Imaging with a High-DQE MV Detector". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955640.
@article{osti_22624387,
title = {SU-D-BRA-07: Applications of Combined KV/MV CBCT Imaging with a High-DQE MV Detector},
author = {Bazalova-Carter, M and Newson, M and Wang, A and Star-Lack, J and Wu, M and Xing, L and Fahrig, R and Ansbacher, W},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate whether a high detection quantum efficiency (DQE) MV detector makes combined kV/MV CBCT clinically practical. Methods: Combined kV/MV CBCT was studied for scan time reduction (STR) and metal artifact reduction (MAR). 6MV CBCT data (dose rate = 0.017 MU/degree) were collected using 1) a novel focused pixelated cadmium tungstate (CWO) scintillator (15mm thickness, DQE(0) = 22%, 0.784mm pixel pitch) coupled to a flat panel imager, and 2) a commercial portal imager with a 133mg/cm{sup 2} gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS) screen (DQE(0) = 1.2%). The 100kVp data were acquired using a commercial imager employing a columnar cesium iodide scintillator (DQE(0) = 70%) with a dose rate of 0.0016 cGy/degree. For STR, MV and kV projections spanning 105° were combined to constitute a complete CBCT scan. Total dose was ∼2cGy and acquisition time was 18s. For MAR, only the metalcorrupted pixels in the kV projections were replaced with MV data resulting in a total dose of less than 1cGy for a 360° scan. Image quality was assessed using an 18-cm diameter electron density phantom with nine tissue inserts, some of which were replaced with steel rods for MAR studies. Results: The CWO contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was ∼4.0x higher than the GOS CNR and was ∼4.8x lower than the kV CNR when normalized for dose. When CWO MV data were combined with kV data for STR, all contrast inserts were visible, but only two were detectable in the composite kV/GOS image. Metal artifacts were greatly reduced using the kV/MV MAR technique with all contrast inserts clearly visible in the composite kV/CWO image but only two inserts visible in the composite kV/GOS image. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a high DQE MV detector significantly improves kV/MV CBCT image quality thus enabling scan time reduction and metal artifact reduction without a severe dose penalty. AW and JS-L are employees of Varian, RF is an employee of Siemens.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955640},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To combine orthogonal kilo-voltage (kV) and Mega-voltage (MV) projection data for short scan cone-beam CT to reduce imaging time on current radiation treatment systems, using a calibration-free gain correction method. Methods: Combining two orthogonal projection data sets for kV and MV imaging hardware can reduce the scan angle to as small as 110° (90°+fan) such that the total scan time is ∼18 seconds, or within a breath hold. To obtain an accurate reconstruction, the MV projection data is first linearly corrected using linear regression using the redundant data from the start and end of the sinogram, and then themore » combined data is reconstructed using the FDK method. To correct for the different changes of attenuation coefficients in kV/MV between soft tissue and bone, the forward projection of the segmented bone and soft tissue from the first reconstruction in the redundant region are added to the linear regression model. The MV data is corrected again using the additional information from the segmented image, and combined with kV for a second FDK reconstruction. We simulated polychromatic 120 kVp (conventional a-Si EPID with CsI) and 2.5 MVp (prototype high-DQE MV detector) projection data with Poisson noise using the XCAT phantom. The gain correction and combined kV/MV short scan reconstructions were tested with head and thorax cases, and simple contrast-to-noise ratio measurements were made in a low-contrast pattern in the head. Results: The FDK reconstruction using the proposed gain correction method can effectively reduce artifacts caused by the differences of attenuation coefficients in the kV/MV data. The CNRs of the short scans for kV, MV, and kV/MV are 5.0, 2.6 and 3.4 respectively. The proposed gain correction method also works with truncated projections. Conclusion: A novel gain correction and reconstruction method was developed to generate short scan CBCT from orthogonal kV/MV projections. This work is supported by NIH Grant 5R01CA138426-05.« less
  • Cone-beam X-ray volumetric imaging in the treatment room, allows online correction of set-up errors and offline assessment of residual set-up errors and organ motion. In this study the registration algorithm of the X-ray volume imaging software (XVI, Elekta, Crawley, United Kingdom), which manages a commercial cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based positioning system, has been tested using a homemade and an anthropomorphic phantom to: (1) assess its performance in detecting known translational and rotational set-up errors and (2) transfer the transformation matrix of its registrations into a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) for offline organ motion analysis. Furthermore, CBCT dose index hasmore » been measured for a particular site (prostate: 120 kV, 1028.8 mAs, approximately 640 frames) using a standard Perspex cylindrical body phantom (diameter 32 cm, length 15 cm) and a 10-cm-long pencil ionization chamber. We have found that known displacements were correctly calculated by the registration software to within 1.3 mm and 0.4{sup o}. For the anthropomorphic phantom, only translational displacements have been considered. Both studies have shown errors within the intrinsic uncertainty of our system for translational displacements (estimated as 0.87 mm) and rotational displacements (estimated as 0.22{sup o}). The resulting table translations proposed by the system to correct the displacements were also checked with portal images and found to place the isocenter of the plan on the linac isocenter within an error of 1 mm, which is the dimension of the spherical lead marker inserted at the center of the homemade phantom. The registration matrix translated into the TPS image fusion module correctly reproduced the alignment between planning CT scans and CBCT scans. Finally, measurements on the CBCT dose index indicate that CBCT acquisition delivers less dose than conventional CT scans and electronic portal imaging device portals. The registration software was found to be accurate, and its registration matrix can be easily translated into the TPS and a low dose is delivered to the patient during image acquisition. These results can help in designing imaging protocols for offline evaluations.« less
  • Purpose: To present our single-institution experience with image-guided radiotherapy comparing fiducial markers and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for daily localization of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2007 to October 2008, 36 patients with prostate cancer received intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily localization by use of implanted fiducials. Orthogonal kilovoltage (kV) portal imaging preceded all 1244 treatments. Cone-beam computed tomography images were also obtained before 286 treatments (23%). Shifts in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) dimensions were made from kV fiducial imaging. Cone-beam computed tomography shifts based on soft tissues were recorded. Shifts were compared by usemore » of Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Mean and standard deviation of absolute differences were also compared. A difference of 5 mm or less was acceptable. Subsets including start date, body mass index, and prostate size were analyzed. Results: Of 286 treatments, 81 (28%) resulted in a greater than 5.0-mm difference in one or more dimensions. Mean differences in the AP, SI, and LR dimensions were 3.4 {+-} 2.6 mm, 3.1 {+-} 2.7 mm, and 1.3 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively. Most deviations occurred in the posterior (fiducials, 78%; CBCT, 59%), superior (79%, 61%), and left (57%, 63%) directions. Bland-Altman 95% confidence intervals were -4.0 to 9.3 mm for AP, -9.0 to 5.3 mm for SI, and -4.1 to 3.9 mm for LR. The percentages of shift agreements within {+-}5 mm were 72.4% for AP, 72.7% for SI, and 97.2% for LR. Correlation between imaging techniques was not altered by time, body mass index, or prostate size. Conclusions: Cone-beam computed tomography and kV fiducial imaging are similar; however, more than one-fourth of CBCT and kV shifts differed enough to affect target coverage. This was even more pronounced with smaller margins (3 mm). Fiducial imaging requires less daily physician input, is less time-consuming, and is our preferred method for prostate image-guided radiotherapy.« less
  • The goal of this work was to use daily kV-kV imaging and weekly cone-beam CT (CBCT) to evaluate rectal cancer patient position when treated on a new couch top belly board (BB). Quality assurance (QA) of the imaging system was conducted weekly to ensure proper performance. The positional uncertainty of the combined kV-kV image match and subsequent couch move was found to be no more than {+-} 1.0 mm. The average (1 SD) CBCT QA phantom match was anterior-posterior (AP) = -0.8 {+-} 0.2 mm, superior-inferior (SI) = 0.9 {+-} 0.2 mm, and left-right (LR) = -0.1 {+-} 0.1 mm.more » For treatment, a set of orthogonal kV-kV images were taken and a bony anatomy match performed online. Moves were made along each axis (AP, SI, and LR) and recorded for analysis. CBCT data were acquired once every 5 fractions for a total of 5 images per patient. The images were all taken after the couch move but before treatment. A 3-dimensional (3D-3D) bony anatomy auto-match was performed offline and the residual difference in position recorded for analysis. The average ({+-} 1 SD) move required from skin marks, calculated over all 375 fractions (15 patients Multiplication-Sign 25 fractions/patient), were AP = -2.6 {+-} 3.7 mm, SI = -0.3 {+-} 4.9 mm, and LR = 1.8 {+-} 4.5 mm. The average residual difference in patient position calculated from the weekly CBCT data (75 total) were AP = -1.7 {+-} 0.4 mm, SI = 1.1 {+-} 0.6 mm, and LR = -0.5 {+-} 0.2 mm. These results show that the BB does provide simple patient positioning that is accurate to within {+-} 2.0 mm when using online orthogonal kV-kV image matching of the pelvic bony anatomy.« less
  • Purpose: A novel method has been developed for volume of interest (VOI) cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging using a 2.35 MV/Carbon target linac imaging beam line combined with dynamic multileaf collimator sequences. Methods: The authors demonstrate the concept of acquisition of multiple, separate imaging volumes, where volumes can be either completely separated or nested, and are associated with predetermined imaging dose and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) characteristics. Two individual MLC sequences were established in the planning system (Eclipse, Varian Medical) to collimate the beam according to a defined inner VOI (e.g., containing a target volume under image guidance) and an outer VOImore » (e.g., including surrounding landmarks or organs-at-risk). MLC sequences were interleaved as a function of gantry angle to produce a reconstructed CBCT image with nested VOIs. By controlling the ratio of inner-to-outer ratio of MLC segments (and thus Monitor Units) during acquisition, the relative dose and CNR in the two volumes can be controlled. Inner-to-outer ratios of 2:1 to 6:1 were examined. Results: The concept was explored using an anatomical head phantom to assess image quality. A geometric phantom was used to quantify absolute dose and CNR values for the various sequences. The authors found that the dose in the outer VOI decreased by a functional relationship dependent on the inner-to-outer sequence ratio, while the CNR varied by the square root of dose, as expected. Conclusions: In this study the authors demonstrate flexibility in VOI CBCT by tailoring the imaging dose and CNR distribution in separate volumes within the patient anatomy. This would allow for high quality imaging of a target volume for alignment purposes, with simultaneous low dose imaging of the surrounding anatomy (e.g., for coregistration)« less