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Title: SU-D-BRA-06: Duodenal Interfraction Motion with Abdominal Compression

Abstract

Purpose: To quantify the effect of abdominal compression on duodenal motion during pancreatic radiotherapy. Methods: Seven patients treated for pancreatic cancer were selected for analysis. Four patients were treated with abdominal compression and three without. The duodenum was contoured by the same physician on each CBCT (five CBCTs for patients with compression, four for non-compression patients). CBCTs were rigidly registered using a soft tissue match and contours were copied to the delivered plans which were all radical (BED > 50 Gy). The distance between the duodenum on the planning CT and each CBCT was quantified by calculating the root mean square (RMS) distance. The DVHs of each abdominal compression patient was converted to an EQD2 DVH (alpha/beta = 10) using an in-house tool and volumes receiving at least 25, 35, 45, and 50 Gy were recorded. Results: The maximum variation in duodenal volumes on the CBCTs for the four abdominal compression patients were 19.1 cm{sup 3} (32.8%), 19.1 cm{sup 3} (20.6%), 19.9 cm{sup 3} (14.3%), and 12.9 cm{sup 3} (27.3%) compared to 15.2 cm{sup 3} (17.6%), 34.7 cm{sup 3} (83.4%), and 56 cm{sup 3} (60.2%) for non-compression patients. The average RMS distance between the duodenum on the planning CT andmore » each CBCT for all abdominal compression patients was 0.3 cm compared to 0.7 cm for non-compressed patients. The largest (and average) difference between the planning CT and CBCTs in volume of duodenum receiving more than 25, 35, 45 and 50 Gy for abdominal compression patients was 11% (5%), 9% (3%), 9% (2%), and 6% (1%). Conclusion: Abdominal compression reduces variation in volume and absolute position of the duodenum throughout treatment. This is seen as an improvement but does not eliminate the need to consider dosimetric effects of motion. Abdominal compression is particularly useful in SBRT when only a few fractions are delivered. Alon Witztum is supported by an MRC/Gray Institute DPhil Studentship. Daniel Holyoake is supported by a CRUK/Nuffield Clinical Research Fellowship. Sam Warren and Mike Partridge are supported by CRUK grant C5255/A15935. Maria Hawkins received an MRC Fellowship MC-PC-12001/2.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624386
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ANIMAL TISSUES; COMPRESSION; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; NEOPLASMS; PANCREAS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIOTHERAPY; SMALL INTESTINE

Citation Formats

Witztum, A, Holyoake, D, Warren, S, Partridge, M, and Hawkins, M. SU-D-BRA-06: Duodenal Interfraction Motion with Abdominal Compression. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955639.
Witztum, A, Holyoake, D, Warren, S, Partridge, M, & Hawkins, M. SU-D-BRA-06: Duodenal Interfraction Motion with Abdominal Compression. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955639.
Witztum, A, Holyoake, D, Warren, S, Partridge, M, and Hawkins, M. 2016. "SU-D-BRA-06: Duodenal Interfraction Motion with Abdominal Compression". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955639.
@article{osti_22624386,
title = {SU-D-BRA-06: Duodenal Interfraction Motion with Abdominal Compression},
author = {Witztum, A and Holyoake, D and Warren, S and Partridge, M and Hawkins, M},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To quantify the effect of abdominal compression on duodenal motion during pancreatic radiotherapy. Methods: Seven patients treated for pancreatic cancer were selected for analysis. Four patients were treated with abdominal compression and three without. The duodenum was contoured by the same physician on each CBCT (five CBCTs for patients with compression, four for non-compression patients). CBCTs were rigidly registered using a soft tissue match and contours were copied to the delivered plans which were all radical (BED > 50 Gy). The distance between the duodenum on the planning CT and each CBCT was quantified by calculating the root mean square (RMS) distance. The DVHs of each abdominal compression patient was converted to an EQD2 DVH (alpha/beta = 10) using an in-house tool and volumes receiving at least 25, 35, 45, and 50 Gy were recorded. Results: The maximum variation in duodenal volumes on the CBCTs for the four abdominal compression patients were 19.1 cm{sup 3} (32.8%), 19.1 cm{sup 3} (20.6%), 19.9 cm{sup 3} (14.3%), and 12.9 cm{sup 3} (27.3%) compared to 15.2 cm{sup 3} (17.6%), 34.7 cm{sup 3} (83.4%), and 56 cm{sup 3} (60.2%) for non-compression patients. The average RMS distance between the duodenum on the planning CT and each CBCT for all abdominal compression patients was 0.3 cm compared to 0.7 cm for non-compressed patients. The largest (and average) difference between the planning CT and CBCTs in volume of duodenum receiving more than 25, 35, 45 and 50 Gy for abdominal compression patients was 11% (5%), 9% (3%), 9% (2%), and 6% (1%). Conclusion: Abdominal compression reduces variation in volume and absolute position of the duodenum throughout treatment. This is seen as an improvement but does not eliminate the need to consider dosimetric effects of motion. Abdominal compression is particularly useful in SBRT when only a few fractions are delivered. Alon Witztum is supported by an MRC/Gray Institute DPhil Studentship. Daniel Holyoake is supported by a CRUK/Nuffield Clinical Research Fellowship. Sam Warren and Mike Partridge are supported by CRUK grant C5255/A15935. Maria Hawkins received an MRC Fellowship MC-PC-12001/2.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955639},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: For patients receiving liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), abdominal compression can reduce organ motion, and daily image guidance can reduce setup error. The reproducibility of liver shape under compression may impact treatment delivery accuracy. The purpose of this study was to measure the interfractional variability in liver shape under compression, after best-fit rigid liver-to-liver registration from kilovoltage (kV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans to planning computed tomography (CT) scans and its impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) position. Methods and Materials: Evaluable patients were treated in a Research Ethics Board-approved SBRT six-fraction study with abdominal compression. Kilovoltage CBCTmore » scans were acquired before treatment and reconstructed as respiratory sorted CBCT scans offline. Manual rigid liver-to-liver registrations were performed from exhale-phase CBCT scans to exhale planning CT scans. Each CBCT liver was contoured, exported, and compared with the planning CT scan for spatial differences, by use of in house-developed finite-element model-based deformable registration (MORFEUS). Results: We evaluated 83 CBCT scans from 16 patients with 30 GTVs. The mean volume of liver that deformed by greater than 3 mm was 21.7%. Excluding 1 outlier, the maximum volume that deformed by greater than 3 mm was 36.3% in a single patient. Over all patients, the absolute maximum deformations in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior directions were 10.5 mm (SD, 2.2), 12.9 mm (SD, 3.6), and 5.6 mm (SD, 2.7), respectively. The absolute mean predicted impact of liver volume displacements on GTV by use of center of mass displacements was 0.09 mm (SD, 0.13), 0.13 mm (SD, 0.18), and 0.08 mm (SD, 0.07) in the left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Conclusions: Interfraction liver deformations in patients undergoing SBRT under abdominal compression after rigid liver-to-liver registrations on respiratory sorted CBCT scans were small in most patients (<5 mm).« less
  • Purpose: To assess the effect of abdominal compression on the interfraction variation in tumor position in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a larger series of patients with large tumor motion amplitude.Methods: Thirty patients with lung tumor motion exceeding 8 mm who underwent SBRT were included in this study. After translational and rotational initial setup error was corrected based on bone anatomy, CBCT images were acquired for each fraction. The residual interfraction variation was defined as the difference between the centroid position of the visualized target in three dimensions derived from CBCT scans and thosemore » derived from averaged intensity projection images. The authors compared the magnitude of the interfraction variation in tumor position between patients treated with [n= 16 (76 fractions)] and without [n= 14 (76 fractions)] abdominal compression.Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of the motion amplitude in the longitudinal direction before abdominal compression was 19.9 ± 7.3 (range, 10–40) mm and was significantly (p < 0.01) reduced to 12.4 ± 5.8 (range, 5–30) mm with compression. The greatest variance of the interfraction variation with abdominal compression was observed in the longitudinal direction, with a mean ± SD of 0.79 ± 3.05 mm, compared to −0.60 ± 2.10 mm without abdominal compression. The absolute values of the 95th percentile of the interfraction variation for one side in each direction were 3.97/6.21 mm (posterior/anterior), 4.16/3.76 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.90/2.32 mm (right/left) without abdominal compression, and 2.14/5.03 mm (posterior/anterior), 3.93/9.23 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.37/5.45 mm (right/left) with abdominal compression. An absolute interfraction variation greater than 5 mm was observed in six (9.2%) fractions without and 13 (17.1%) fractions with abdominal compression.Conclusions: Abdominal compression was effective for reducing the amplitude of tumor motion. However, in most of the authors’ patients, the use of abdominal compression seemed to increase the interfraction variation in tumor position, despite reducing lung tumor motion. The daily tumor position deviated more systematically from the tumor position in the planning CT scan in the lateral and longitudinal directions in patients treated with abdominal compression compared to those treated without compression. Therefore, target matching is required to correct or minimize the interfraction variation.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of different abdominal compression levels on tumor and organ motion during stereotactic body radiotherapy of lower lobe lung and liver tumors using four-dimensional (4D)-CT scan analysis. Methods and Materials: Three 4D-CT scans were acquired for 10 patients first using with no compression and then compared with two different levels of abdominal compression. The position of the tumor and various organs were defined at the peak inspiratory and expiratory phases and compared to determine the maximum motion. Results: Mean ({+-}SD) medium compression force (MC) and high compression force (HC) were 47.6 {+-} 16.0 N and 90.7more » {+-} 27.1 N, respectively. Mean overall tumor motion was 13.6 mm (2{sigma} [2 sigma] 11.5-15.6), 8.3 mm (2{sigma} 6.0-10.5), and 7.2 mm (2{sigma} 5.4-9.0) for no compression, MC, and HC, respectively. A significant difference in the control of both superior-inferior (SI) and overall motion of tumors was seen with the application of MC and HC when compared with no compression (p < 0.0001 for both). High compression force improved SI and overall tumor motion compared with MC, but this was only significant for SI motion (p = 0.04 and p = 0.06). Significant control of organ motion was only seen in the pancreas (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Four-dimensional CT shows significant control of both lower lobe lung and liver tumors using abdominal compression. High levels of compression improve SI tumor motion when compared with MC.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate in a three-dimensional framework the effectiveness and reproducibility of reducing the respiratory motion of liver tumors using abdominal compression in a stereotactic body frame. Methods and Materials: A total of 12 patients with liver tumors, who were treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy, were included in this study. These patients had three gold fiducial markers implanted in the healthy liver tissue surrounding the tumor. Fluoroscopic videos were acquired on the planning day and before each treatment fraction to visualize the motion of the fiducial markers during free breathing and varying levels of abdominal compression. Software was developed tomore » track the fiducial markers and measure their excursions. Results: Abdominal compression reduced the patient group median excursion by 62% in the craniocaudal and 38% in the anteroposterior direction with respect to the median free-breathing excursions. In the left-right direction, the median excursion increased 15% (maximal increase 1.6 mm). The median residual excursion was 4.1 mm in the craniocaudal, 2.4 mm in the anteroposterior, and 1.8 mm in the left-right direction. The mean excursions were reduced by compression to <5 mm in all patients and all directions, with two exceptions (craniocaudal excursion reduction of 20.5 mm to 7.4 mm and of 21.1 mm to 5.9 mm). The residual excursions reproduced well during the treatment course, and the craniocaudal excursions measured on the treatment days were never significantly ({alpha} = 0.05) greater than on the planning days. Fine tuning the compression did not considerably change the excursion on the treatment days. Conclusions: Abdominal compression effectively reduced liver tumor motion, yielding small and reproducible excursions in three dimensions. The compression level established at planning could have been safely used on the treatment days.« less
  • Purpose: Abdominal compression (AC) can be used to reduce respiratory liver motion in patients undergoing liver stereotactic body radiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to measure the changes in three-dimensional liver tumor motion with and without compression using cine-magnetic resonance imaging. Patients and Methods: A total of 60 patients treated as a part of an institutional research ethics board-approved liver stereotactic body radiotherapy protocol underwent cine T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging through the tumor centroid in the coronal and sagittal planes. A total of 240 cine-magnetic resonance imaging sequences acquired at one to three images each second for 30-60more » s were evaluated using an in-house-developed template matching tool (based on the coefficient correlation) to measure the magnitude of the tumor motion. The average tumor edge displacements were used to determine the magnitude of changes in the caudal-cranial (CC) and anteroposterior (AP) directions, with and without AC. Results: The mean tumor motion without AC of 11.7 mm (range, 4.8-23.3) in the CC direction was reduced to 9.4 mm (range, 1.6-23.4) with AC. The tumor motion was reduced in both directions (CC and AP) in 52% of the patients and in a single direction (CC or AP) in 90% of the patients. The mean decrease in tumor motion with AC was 2.3 and 0.6 mm in the CC and AP direction, respectively. Increased motion occurred in one or more directions in 28% of patients. Clinically significant (>3 mm) decreases were observed in 40% and increases in <2% of patients in the CC direction. Conclusion: AC can significantly reduce three-dimensional liver tumor motion in most patients, although the magnitude of the reduction was smaller than previously reported.« less