skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-D-BRA-01: Feasibility Study for Swallowing Prediction Using Pressure Sensors

Abstract

Purpose: To develop a swallowing prediction system (SPS) using force sensing sensors and evaluate its feasibility. Methods: The SPS developed consists of force sensing sensor units, a thermoplastic mask, a signal transport device and a control PC installed with an in-house software. The SPS is designed to predict the pharyngeal stage of swallowing because it is known that internal organ movement occurs in pharyngeal stage. To detect prediction signal in the SPS, the force sensing sensor units were attached on both the submental muscle region and thyroid cartilage region of the thermoplastic mask. While the signal from the thyroid cartilage region informs the action of swallowing, the signal from the submental muscle region is utilized as a precursor for swallowing. Since the duration of swallowing is relatively short, using such precursor (or warning) signals for machine control is considered more beneficial. A volunteer study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the system. In this volunteer study, we intended to verify that the system could predict the pharyngeal stage of the swallowing. We measured time gaps between obtaining the warning signals in the SPS and starting points of the pharyngeal stage of swallowing. Results: The measured data was examined whethermore » the time gaps were in reasonable order to be easily utilized. The mean and standard deviation values of these time gaps were 0.550 s ± 0.183 s. in 8 volunteers. Conclusion: The proposed method was able to predict the on-set of swallowing of human subjects inside the thermoplastic mask, which has never been possible with other monitoring systems such as camera-based monitoring system. With the prediction ability of swallowing incorporated into the machine control mechanism (in the future), beam delivery can be controlled to skip swallowing periods and significant dosimetric gain is expected in head & neck cancer treatments. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2015M2A2A7038291) and by the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT&Future Planning.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
  2. Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624382
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CARTILAGE; CONTROL SYSTEMS; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; MUSCLES; PRECURSOR; SENSORS; THERMOPLASTICS; THYROID

Citation Formats

Cho, M, Kim, T, Kim, D, Kang, S, Kim, K, Shin, D, Noh, Y, Suh, T, and Kim, S. SU-D-BRA-01: Feasibility Study for Swallowing Prediction Using Pressure Sensors. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955634.
Cho, M, Kim, T, Kim, D, Kang, S, Kim, K, Shin, D, Noh, Y, Suh, T, & Kim, S. SU-D-BRA-01: Feasibility Study for Swallowing Prediction Using Pressure Sensors. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955634.
Cho, M, Kim, T, Kim, D, Kang, S, Kim, K, Shin, D, Noh, Y, Suh, T, and Kim, S. 2016. "SU-D-BRA-01: Feasibility Study for Swallowing Prediction Using Pressure Sensors". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955634.
@article{osti_22624382,
title = {SU-D-BRA-01: Feasibility Study for Swallowing Prediction Using Pressure Sensors},
author = {Cho, M and Kim, T and Kim, D and Kang, S and Kim, K and Shin, D and Noh, Y and Suh, T and Kim, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To develop a swallowing prediction system (SPS) using force sensing sensors and evaluate its feasibility. Methods: The SPS developed consists of force sensing sensor units, a thermoplastic mask, a signal transport device and a control PC installed with an in-house software. The SPS is designed to predict the pharyngeal stage of swallowing because it is known that internal organ movement occurs in pharyngeal stage. To detect prediction signal in the SPS, the force sensing sensor units were attached on both the submental muscle region and thyroid cartilage region of the thermoplastic mask. While the signal from the thyroid cartilage region informs the action of swallowing, the signal from the submental muscle region is utilized as a precursor for swallowing. Since the duration of swallowing is relatively short, using such precursor (or warning) signals for machine control is considered more beneficial. A volunteer study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the system. In this volunteer study, we intended to verify that the system could predict the pharyngeal stage of the swallowing. We measured time gaps between obtaining the warning signals in the SPS and starting points of the pharyngeal stage of swallowing. Results: The measured data was examined whether the time gaps were in reasonable order to be easily utilized. The mean and standard deviation values of these time gaps were 0.550 s ± 0.183 s. in 8 volunteers. Conclusion: The proposed method was able to predict the on-set of swallowing of human subjects inside the thermoplastic mask, which has never been possible with other monitoring systems such as camera-based monitoring system. With the prediction ability of swallowing incorporated into the machine control mechanism (in the future), beam delivery can be controlled to skip swallowing periods and significant dosimetric gain is expected in head & neck cancer treatments. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2015M2A2A7038291) and by the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT&Future Planning.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955634},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • A new type of fiber-optic chemical sensor has been developed for the determination and differentiation of geometric isomers. The operation of the sensor is based upon the molecular-geometric-selective absorption of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on a liquid crystal. The selective interaction of a PAH with a liquid-crystal substrate causes quenching of the liquid-crystal fluorescence. Detection limits of such a device for PAH compounds approach 10{sup {minus}10} mol/cm{sup 3}; the sensor response time is about 2 min. Because the sensor is based upon physical absorption, it is reusable and reversible.
  • Purpose: To evaluate the possibility of a fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FCRS) for in vivo dose verification in proton therapy. Methods: The Cerenkov radiation due to the proton beam was measured using a homemade phantom, consisting of a plastic optical fiber (POF, PGSCD1001-13-E, Toray, Tokyo, Japan) connected to each channel of a multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT:H7546, Hamamatsu Photonics, Shizuoka, Japan). Data were acquired using a multi-anode photomultiplier tube with the NI-DAQ system (National Instruments Texas, USA). The real-time monitoring graphic user interface was programmed using Labview. The FCRS was analyzed for its dosimetrics characteristic in proton beam. To determine themore » accuracy of the FCRS in proton dose measurements, we compared the ionization chamber dose measurements using a water phantom. We investigated the feasibility of the FCRS for the measurement of dose distributions near the superficial region for proton plans with a varying separation between the target volume and the surface of 3 patients using a humanoid phantom. Results: The dose-response has good linearity. Dose-rate and energy dependence were found to be within 1%. Depth-dose distributions in non-modulated proton beams obtained with the FCRS was in good agreement with the depth-dose measurements from the ionization chamber. To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy of the FCRS, the difference of isocenter dose between the delivery dose calculated by the treatment planning system and that measured by the FCRS was within 3%. With in vivo dosimetry using the humanoid phantom, the calculated surface doses overestimated measurements by 4%–8% using FCRS. Conclusion: In previous study, our results indicate that the performance of the array-type FCRS was comparable to that of the currently used a multi-layer ion chamber system. In this study, we also believe that the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor has considerable potential for use with in vivo patient proton dosimetry.« less
  • Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercisesmore » thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions: Muscles of both the suprahyoid and the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle groups are active in swallowing, and both swallowing exercises effectively target muscles elevating the hyolaryngeal complex. mfMRI is useful in testing swallowing muscle function.« less
  • A burst pressure prediction model was generated from the acoustic emission amplitude distribution data taken during hydroproof for three sets of ASTM standard 145 mm (5.75 in.) diameter filament wound graphite/epoxy bottles. The three sets of bottles featured the same design parameters and were wound from the same graphite fiber, the only difference being in the epoxies used. Therefore, the three resin types were categorized using dummy variables, which allowed the prediction of burst pressures in all three sets of bottles using a single back-propagation neural network. Three bottles from each set were used to train the network. The resinmore » category and the acoustic emission amplitude distribution data taken up to 25 percent of the expect burst pressure were used as network inputs. The actual burst pressures were supplied as target values for the supervised training phase. Architecturally, the network consisted of a 48 neuron input layer (a categorical variable defining the resin type, plus 47 integer variables for the acoustic emission amplitude distribution frequencies), a 15 neural hidden layer for mapping, and a single output neuron for burst pressure prediction. The network, trained on three bottles from each resin type, was able to predict burst pressures in the remaining bottles with a worst case error of {minus}3.89 percent, well within the desired goal of {+-}5 percent.« less
  • Imperfections in the production process of thick CCDs lead to circularly symmetric dopant concentration variations, which in turn produce electric fields transverse to the surface of the fully depleted CCD that displace the photogenerated charges. We use PhoSim, a Monte Carlo photon simulator, to explore and examine the likely impacts these dopant concentration variations will have on astrometric measurements in LSST. The scale and behavior of both the astrometric shifts imparted to point sources and the intensity variations in flat field images that result from these doping imperfections are similar to those previously observed in Dark Energy Camera CCDs, givingmore » initial confirmation of PhoSim's model for these effects. In addition, the organized shape distortions were observed as a result of the symmetric nature of these dopant variations, causing nominally round sources to be imparted with a measurable ellipticity either aligned with or transverse to the radial direction of this dopant variation pattern.« less