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Title: SU-D-BRC-06: Experimental and Monte Carlo Studies of Fluence Corrections for Graphite Calorimetry in Proton Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: For photon and electron beams, the standard device used to measure absorbed dose is a calorimeter. Standards laboratories are currently working on the establishment of graphite calorimeters as a primary standard for proton beams. To provide a practical method for graphite calorimetry, it is necessary to convert dose to graphite to dose to water, requiring knowledge of the water-to-graphite stopping-power ratio and the fluence correction factor. This study aims to present a novel method to determine fluence corrections experimentally, and to apply this methodology to low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Measurements were performed in 60 MeV and 180 MeV proton beams. Experimental information was obtained from depth-dose ionization chamber measurements performed in a water phantom. This was repeated with different thicknesses of graphite plates in front of the water phantom. One distinct advantage of this method is that only ionization chamber perturbation factors for water are required. Fluence corrections were also obtained through Monte Carlo simulations for comparison with the experiments. Results: The experimental observations made in this study confirm the Monte Carlo results. Overall, fluence corrections between water and graphite increased with depth, with a maximum correction of 1% for the low-energy beam and 4% for themore » high-energy beam. The results also showed that a fraction of the secondary particles generated in proton therapy beams do not have enough energy to cross the ionization chamber wall; thus, their contribution is not accounted for in the measured fluence corrections. This effect shows up as a discrepancy in fluence corrections of 1% and has been confirmed by simulations of the experimental setup. Conclusion: Fluence corrections derived by experiment do not account for low-energy secondary particles that are stopped in the ion chamber wall. This work will contribute to a practical graphite calorimetry technique for determining absolute dose to water in proton beams.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [1];  [3];  [7]
  1. University College London, London (United Kingdom)
  2. (United Kingdom)
  3. National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom)
  4. University of Montreal, Montreal (Canada)
  5. National Eye Proton therapy Centre, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral (United Kingdom)
  6. Proton Therapy Center, Prague (Czech Republic)
  7. (Austria)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624377
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ABSORBED RADIATION DOSES; CALORIMETERS; CALORIMETRY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CORRECTIONS; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; ELECTRON BEAMS; GRAPHITE; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PHANTOMS; PROTON BEAMS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Lourenco, A, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Thomas, R, Bouchard, H, Kacperek, A, Vondracek, V, Royle, G, Palmans, H, and EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt. SU-D-BRC-06: Experimental and Monte Carlo Studies of Fluence Corrections for Graphite Calorimetry in Proton Therapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955625.
Lourenco, A, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Thomas, R, Bouchard, H, Kacperek, A, Vondracek, V, Royle, G, Palmans, H, & EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt. SU-D-BRC-06: Experimental and Monte Carlo Studies of Fluence Corrections for Graphite Calorimetry in Proton Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955625.
Lourenco, A, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Thomas, R, Bouchard, H, Kacperek, A, Vondracek, V, Royle, G, Palmans, H, and EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt. Wed . "SU-D-BRC-06: Experimental and Monte Carlo Studies of Fluence Corrections for Graphite Calorimetry in Proton Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955625.
@article{osti_22624377,
title = {SU-D-BRC-06: Experimental and Monte Carlo Studies of Fluence Corrections for Graphite Calorimetry in Proton Therapy},
author = {Lourenco, A and National Physical Laboratory, Teddington and Thomas, R and Bouchard, H and Kacperek, A and Vondracek, V and Royle, G and Palmans, H and EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt},
abstractNote = {Purpose: For photon and electron beams, the standard device used to measure absorbed dose is a calorimeter. Standards laboratories are currently working on the establishment of graphite calorimeters as a primary standard for proton beams. To provide a practical method for graphite calorimetry, it is necessary to convert dose to graphite to dose to water, requiring knowledge of the water-to-graphite stopping-power ratio and the fluence correction factor. This study aims to present a novel method to determine fluence corrections experimentally, and to apply this methodology to low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Measurements were performed in 60 MeV and 180 MeV proton beams. Experimental information was obtained from depth-dose ionization chamber measurements performed in a water phantom. This was repeated with different thicknesses of graphite plates in front of the water phantom. One distinct advantage of this method is that only ionization chamber perturbation factors for water are required. Fluence corrections were also obtained through Monte Carlo simulations for comparison with the experiments. Results: The experimental observations made in this study confirm the Monte Carlo results. Overall, fluence corrections between water and graphite increased with depth, with a maximum correction of 1% for the low-energy beam and 4% for the high-energy beam. The results also showed that a fraction of the secondary particles generated in proton therapy beams do not have enough energy to cross the ionization chamber wall; thus, their contribution is not accounted for in the measured fluence corrections. This effect shows up as a discrepancy in fluence corrections of 1% and has been confirmed by simulations of the experimental setup. Conclusion: Fluence corrections derived by experiment do not account for low-energy secondary particles that are stopped in the ion chamber wall. This work will contribute to a practical graphite calorimetry technique for determining absolute dose to water in proton beams.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955625},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine fluence corrections necessary to convert absorbed dose to graphite, measured by graphite calorimetry, to absorbed dose to water. Fluence corrections were obtained from experiments and Monte Carlo simulations in low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Fluence corrections were calculated to account for the difference in fluence between water and graphite at equivalent depths. Measurements were performed with narrow proton beams. Plane-parallel-plate ionization chambers with a large collecting area compared to the beam diameter were used to intercept the whole beam. High- and low-energy proton beams were provided by a scanning andmore » double scattering delivery system, respectively. A mathematical formalism was established to relate fluence corrections derived from Monte Carlo simulations, using the FLUKA code [A. Ferrari et al., “FLUKA: A multi-particle transport code,” in CERN 2005-10, INFN/TC 05/11, SLAC-R-773 (2005) and T. T. Böhlen et al., “The FLUKA Code: Developments and challenges for high energy and medical applications,” Nucl. Data Sheets 120, 211–214 (2014)], to partial fluence corrections measured experimentally. Results: A good agreement was found between the partial fluence corrections derived by Monte Carlo simulations and those determined experimentally. For a high-energy beam of 180 MeV, the fluence corrections from Monte Carlo simulations were found to increase from 0.99 to 1.04 with depth. In the case of a low-energy beam of 60 MeV, the magnitude of fluence corrections was approximately 0.99 at all depths when calculated in the sensitive area of the chamber used in the experiments. Fluence correction calculations were also performed for a larger area and found to increase from 0.99 at the surface to 1.01 at greater depths. Conclusions: Fluence corrections obtained experimentally are partial fluence corrections because they account for differences in the primary and part of the secondary particle fluence. A correction factor, F(d), has been established to relate fluence corrections defined theoretically to partial fluence corrections derived experimentally. The findings presented here are also relevant to water and tissue-equivalent-plastic materials given their carbon content.« less
  • Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is typically regarded as the most accurate dose calculation method for proton therapy. Yet for real clinical cases, the overall accuracy also depends on that of the MC beam model. Commissioning a beam model to faithfully represent a real beam requires finely tuning a set of model parameters, which could be tedious given the large number of pencil beams to commmission. This abstract reports an automatic beam-model commissioning method for pencil-beam scanning proton therapy via an optimization approach. Methods: We modeled a real pencil beam with energy and spatial spread following Gaussian distributions. Mean energy,more » and energy and spatial spread are model parameters. To commission against a real beam, we first performed MC simulations to calculate dose distributions of a set of ideal (monoenergetic, zero-size) pencil beams. Dose distribution for a real pencil beam is hence linear superposition of doses for those ideal pencil beams with weights in the Gaussian form. We formulated the commissioning task as an optimization problem, such that the calculated central axis depth dose and lateral profiles at several depths match corresponding measurements. An iterative algorithm combining conjugate gradient method and parameter fitting was employed to solve the optimization problem. We validated our method in simulation studies. Results: We calculated dose distributions for three real pencil beams with nominal energies 83, 147 and 199 MeV using realistic beam parameters. These data were regarded as measurements and used for commission. After commissioning, average difference in energy and beam spread between determined values and ground truth were 4.6% and 0.2%. With the commissioned model, we recomputed dose. Mean dose differences from measurements were 0.64%, 0.20% and 0.25%. Conclusion: The developed automatic MC beam-model commissioning method for pencil-beam scanning proton therapy can determine beam model parameters with satisfactory accuracy.« less
  • Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is considered to be the most accurate method for calculation of absorbed dose and fundamental physical quantities related to biological effects in carbon ion therapy. Its long computation time impedes clinical and research applications. We have developed an MC package, goCMC, on parallel processing platforms, aiming at achieving accurate and efficient simulations for carbon therapy. Methods: goCMC was developed under OpenCL framework. It supported transport simulation in voxelized geometry with kinetic energy up to 450 MeV/u. Class II condensed history algorithm was employed for charged particle transport with stopping power computed via Bethe-Bloch equation. Secondarymore » electrons were not transported with their energy locally deposited. Energy straggling and multiple scattering were modeled. Production of secondary charged particles from nuclear interactions was implemented based on cross section and yield data from Geant4. They were transported via the condensed history scheme. goCMC supported scoring various quantities of interest e.g. physical dose, particle fluence, spectrum, linear energy transfer, and positron emitting nuclei. Results: goCMC has been benchmarked against Geant4 with different phantoms and beam energies. For 100 MeV/u, 250 MeV/u and 400 MeV/u beams impinging to a water phantom, range difference was 0.03 mm, 0.20 mm and 0.53 mm, and mean dose difference was 0.47%, 0.72% and 0.79%, respectively. goCMC can run on various computing devices. Depending on the beam energy and voxel size, it took 20∼100 seconds to simulate 10{sup 7} carbons on an AMD Radeon GPU card. The corresponding CPU time for Geant4 with the same setup was 60∼100 hours. Conclusion: We have developed an OpenCL-based cross-platform carbon MC simulation package, goCMC. Its accuracy, efficiency and portability make goCMC attractive for research and clinical applications in carbon therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning and verification using four-dimensional CT (4DCT) for adaptive IMPT for lung cancer patients. Methods: A validated GPU MC code, gPMC, has been linked to the patient database at our institution and employed to compute the dose-influence matrices (Dij) on the planning CT (pCT). The pCT is an average of the respiratory motion of the patient. The Dijs and patient structures were fed to the optimizer to calculate a treatment plan. To validate the plan against motion, a 4D dose distribution averaged over the possible starting phases is calculatedmore » using the 4DCT and a model of the time structure of the delivered spot map. The dose is accumulated using vector maps created by a GPU-accelerated deformable image registration program (DIR) from each phase of the 4DCT to the reference phase using the B-spline method. Calculation of the Dij matrices and the DIR are performed on a cluster, with each field and vector map calculated in parallel. Results: The Dij production takes ∼3.5s per beamlet for 10e6 protons, depending on the energy and the CT size. Generating a plan with 4D simulation of 1000 spots in 4 fields takes approximately 1h. To test the framework, IMPT plans for 10 lung cancer patients were generated for validation. Differences between the planned and the delivered dose of 19% in dose to some organs at risk and 1.4/21.1% in target mean dose/homogeneity with respect to the plan were observed, suggesting potential for improvement if adaptation is considered. Conclusion: A fast MC treatment planning framework has been developed that allows reliable plan design and verification for mobile targets and adaptation of treatment plans. This will significantly impact treatments for lung tumors, as 4D-MC dose calculations can now become part of planning strategies.« less
  • Purpose: Accurate and fast dose calculation is a prerequisite of precision radiation therapy in modern photon and particle therapy. While Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation provides high dosimetric accuracy, the drastically increased computational time hinders its routine use. Deterministic dose calculation methods are fast, but problematic in the presence of tissue density inhomogeneity. We leverage the useful features of deterministic methods and MC to develop a hybrid dose calculation platform with autonomous utilization of MC and deterministic calculation depending on the local geometry, for optimal accuracy and speed. Methods: Our platform utilizes a Geant4 based “localized Monte Carlo” (LMC) methodmore » that isolates MC dose calculations only to volumes that have potential for dosimetric inaccuracy. In our approach, additional structures are created encompassing heterogeneous volumes. Deterministic methods calculate dose and energy fluence up to the volume surfaces, where the energy fluence distribution is sampled into discrete histories and transported using MC. Histories exiting the volume are converted back into energy fluence, and transported deterministically. By matching boundary conditions at both interfaces, deterministic dose calculation account for dose perturbations “downstream” of localized heterogeneities. Hybrid dose calculation was performed for water and anthropomorphic phantoms. Results: We achieved <1% agreement between deterministic and MC calculations in the water benchmark for photon and proton beams, and dose differences of 2%–15% could be observed in heterogeneous phantoms. The saving in computational time (a factor ∼4–7 compared to a full Monte Carlo dose calculation) was found to be approximately proportional to the volume of the heterogeneous region. Conclusion: Our hybrid dose calculation approach takes advantage of the computational efficiency of deterministic method and accuracy of MC, providing a practical tool for high performance dose calculation in modern RT. The approach is generalizable to all modalities where heterogeneities play a large role, notably particle therapy.« less