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Title: SU-C-209-03: Anti-Scatter Grid-Line Artifact Minimization for Removing the Grid Lines for Three Different Grids Used with a High Resolution CMOS Detector

Abstract

Purpose: Demonstrate the effectiveness of an anti-scatter grid artifact minimization method by removing the grid-line artifacts for three different grids when used with a high resolution CMOS detector. Method: Three different stationary x-ray grids were used with a high resolution CMOS x-ray detector (Dexela 1207, 75 µm pixels, sensitivity area 11.5cm × 6.5cm) to image a simulated artery block phantom (Nuclear Associates, Stenosis/Aneurysm Artery Block 76–705) combined with a frontal head phantom used as the scattering source. The x-ray parameters were 98kVp, 200mA, and 16ms for all grids. With all the three grids, two images were acquired: the first for a scatter-less flat field including the grid and the second of the object with the grid which may still have some scatter transmission. Because scatter has a low spatial frequency distribution, it was represented by an estimated constant value as an initial approximation and subtracted from the image of the object with grid before dividing by an average frame of the grid flat-field with no scatter. The constant value was iteratively changed to minimize residual grid-line artifact. This artifact minimization process was used for all the three grids. Results: Anti-scatter grid lines artifacts were successfully eliminated in all the threemore » final images taken with the three different grids. The image contrast and CNR were also compared before and after the correction, and also compared with those from the image of the object when no grid was used. The corrected images showed an increase in CNR of approximately 28%, 33% and 25% for the three grids, as compared to the images when no grid at all was used. Conclusion: Anti-scatter grid-artifact minimization works effectively irrespective of the specifications of the grid when it is used with a high spatial resolution detector. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624347
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ARTERIES; CORRECTIONS; HEAD; IMAGES; ITERATIVE METHODS; MINIMIZATION; PHANTOMS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION

Citation Formats

Rana, R, Bednarek, D, and Rudin, S. SU-C-209-03: Anti-Scatter Grid-Line Artifact Minimization for Removing the Grid Lines for Three Different Grids Used with a High Resolution CMOS Detector. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955592.
Rana, R, Bednarek, D, & Rudin, S. SU-C-209-03: Anti-Scatter Grid-Line Artifact Minimization for Removing the Grid Lines for Three Different Grids Used with a High Resolution CMOS Detector. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955592.
Rana, R, Bednarek, D, and Rudin, S. 2016. "SU-C-209-03: Anti-Scatter Grid-Line Artifact Minimization for Removing the Grid Lines for Three Different Grids Used with a High Resolution CMOS Detector". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955592.
@article{osti_22624347,
title = {SU-C-209-03: Anti-Scatter Grid-Line Artifact Minimization for Removing the Grid Lines for Three Different Grids Used with a High Resolution CMOS Detector},
author = {Rana, R and Bednarek, D and Rudin, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Demonstrate the effectiveness of an anti-scatter grid artifact minimization method by removing the grid-line artifacts for three different grids when used with a high resolution CMOS detector. Method: Three different stationary x-ray grids were used with a high resolution CMOS x-ray detector (Dexela 1207, 75 µm pixels, sensitivity area 11.5cm × 6.5cm) to image a simulated artery block phantom (Nuclear Associates, Stenosis/Aneurysm Artery Block 76–705) combined with a frontal head phantom used as the scattering source. The x-ray parameters were 98kVp, 200mA, and 16ms for all grids. With all the three grids, two images were acquired: the first for a scatter-less flat field including the grid and the second of the object with the grid which may still have some scatter transmission. Because scatter has a low spatial frequency distribution, it was represented by an estimated constant value as an initial approximation and subtracted from the image of the object with grid before dividing by an average frame of the grid flat-field with no scatter. The constant value was iteratively changed to minimize residual grid-line artifact. This artifact minimization process was used for all the three grids. Results: Anti-scatter grid lines artifacts were successfully eliminated in all the three final images taken with the three different grids. The image contrast and CNR were also compared before and after the correction, and also compared with those from the image of the object when no grid was used. The corrected images showed an increase in CNR of approximately 28%, 33% and 25% for the three grids, as compared to the images when no grid at all was used. Conclusion: Anti-scatter grid-artifact minimization works effectively irrespective of the specifications of the grid when it is used with a high spatial resolution detector. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955592},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Anti-scatter grid-line artifacts are more prominent for high-resolution x-ray detectors since the fraction of a pixel blocked by the grid septa is large. Direct logarithmic subtraction of the artifact pattern is limited by residual scattered radiation and we investigate an iterative method for scatter correction. Methods: A stationary Smit-Rοntgen anti-scatter grid was used with a high resolution Dexela 1207 CMOS X-ray detector (75 µm pixel size) to image an artery block (Nuclear Associates, Model 76-705) placed within a uniform head equivalent phantom as the scattering source. The image of the phantom was divided by a flat-field image obtained withoutmore » scatter but with the grid to eliminate grid-line artifacts. Constant scatter values were subtracted from the phantom image before dividing by the averaged flat-field-with-grid image. The standard deviation of pixel values for a fixed region of the resultant images with different subtracted scatter values provided a measure of the remaining grid-line artifacts. Results: A plot of the standard deviation of image pixel values versus the subtracted scatter value shows that the image structure noise reaches a minimum before going up again as the scatter value is increased. This minimum corresponds to a minimization of the grid-line artifacts as demonstrated in line profile plots obtained through each of the images perpendicular to the grid lines. Artifact-free images of the artery block were obtained with the optimal scatter value obtained by this iterative approach. Conclusion: Residual scatter subtraction can provide improved grid-line artifact elimination when using the flat-field with grid “subtraction” technique. The standard deviation of image pixel values can be used to determine the optimal scatter value to subtract to obtain a minimization of grid line artifacts with high resolution x-ray imaging detectors. This study was supported by NIH Grant R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.« less
  • Purpose: Grid artifacts are caused when using the antiscatter grid in obtaining digital x-ray images. In this paper, research on grid artifact reduction techniques is conducted especially for the direct detectors, which are based on amorphous selenium. Methods: In order to analyze and reduce the grid artifacts, the authors consider a multiplicative grid image model and propose a homomorphic filtering technique. For minimal damage due to filters, which are used to suppress the grid artifacts, rotated grids with respect to the sampling direction are employed, and min-max optimization problems for searching optimal grid frequencies and angles for given sampling frequenciesmore » are established. The authors then propose algorithms for the grid artifact reduction based on the band-stop filters as well as low-pass filters. Results: The proposed algorithms are experimentally tested for digital x-ray images, which are obtained from direct detectors with the rotated grids, and are compared with other algorithms. It is shown that the proposed algorithms can successfully reduce the grid artifacts for direct detectors. Conclusions: By employing the homomorphic filtering technique, the authors can considerably suppress the strong grid artifacts with relatively narrow-bandwidth filters compared to the normal filtering case. Using rotated grids also significantly reduces the ringing artifact. Furthermore, for specific grid frequencies and angles, the authors can use simple homomorphic low-pass filters in the spatial domain, and thus alleviate the grid artifacts with very low implementation complexity.« less
  • Purpose: CMOS-based aSe detectors compared to CsI-TFT-based flat panels have the advantages of higher spatial sampling due to smaller pixel size and decreased blurring characteristic of direct rather than indirect detection. For systems with such detectors, the limiting factor degrading image resolution then becomes the focal-spot geometric unsharpness. This effect can seriously limit the use of such detectors in areas such as cone beam computed tomography, clinical fluoroscopy and angiography. In this work a technique to remove the effect of focal-spot blur is presented for a simulated aSe detector. Method: To simulate images from an aSe detector affected with focal-spotmore » blur, first a set of high-resolution images of a stent (FRED from Microvention, Inc.) were acquired using a 75µm pixel size Dexela-Perkin-Elmer detector and averaged to reduce quantum noise. Then the averaged image was blurred with a known Gaussian blur at two different magnifications to simulate an idealized focal spot. The blurred images were then deconvolved with a set of different Gaussian blurs to remove the effect of focal-spot blurring using a threshold-based, inverse-filtering method. Results: The blur was removed by deconvolving the images using a set of Gaussian functions for both magnifications. Selecting the correct function resulted in an image close to the original; however, selection of too wide a function would cause severe artifacts. Conclusion: Experimentally, focal-spot blur at different magnifications can be measured using a pin hole with a high resolution detector. This spread function can be used to deblur the input images that are acquired at corresponding magnifications to correct for the focal spot blur. For CBCT applications, the magnification of specific objects can be obtained using initial reconstructions then corrected for focal-spot blurring to improve resolution. Similarly, if object magnification can be determined such correction may be applied in fluoroscopy and angiography.« less
  • Purpose: Extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT) with an amorphous silicon (aSi) flat-panel detector (FPD) provides low-dose volumetric imaging with high spatial resolution. We investigate the performance of the newer complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors to enhance resolution of extremities CBCT to ∼0.1 mm, enabling morphological analysis of trabecular bone. Quantitative in-vivo imaging of bone microarchitecture could present an important advance for osteoporosis and osteoarthritis diagnosis and therapy assessment. Methods: Cascaded systems models of CMOS- and FPD-based extremities CBCT were implemented. Performance was compared for a range of pixel sizes (0.05–0.4 mm), focal spot sizes (0.3–0.6 FS), and x-ray techniques (0.05–0.8 mAs/projection)more » using detectability of high-, low-, and all-frequency tasks for a nonprewhitening observer. Test-bench implementation of CMOS-based extremity CBCT involved a Teledyne DALSA Xineos3030HR detector with 0.099 mm pixels and a compact rotating anode x-ray source with 0.3 FS (IMD RTM37). Metrics of bone morphology obtained using CMOS-based CBCT were compared in cadaveric specimens to FPD-based system using a Varian PaxScan4030 (0.194 mm pixels). Results: Finer pixel size and reduced electronic noise for CMOS (136 e compared to 2000 e for FPD) resulted in ∼1.9× increase in detectability for high-frequency tasks and ∼1.1× increase for all-frequency tasks. Incorporation of the new x-ray source with reduced focal spot size (0.3 FS vs. 0.5 FS used on current extremities CBCT) improved detectability for CMOS-based CBCT by ∼1.7× for high-frequency tasks. Compared to FPD CBCT, the CMOS detector yielded improved agreement with micro-CT in measurements of trabecular thickness (∼1.7× reduction in relative error), bone volume (∼1.5× reduction), and trabecular spacing (∼3.5× reduction). Conclusion: Imaging performance modelling and experimentation indicate substantial improvements for high-frequency imaging tasks through adoption of the CMOS detector and small FS x-ray source, motivating the use of these components in a new system for quantitative in-vivo imaging of trabecular bone. Financial Support: US NIH grant R01EB018896. Qian Cao is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Student Research Fellow. Disclosures: W Zbijewski, J Siewerdsen and A Sisniega receive research funding from Carestream Health.« less
  • The authors have shown in previous works that distinct non-stationary analytical scatter kernels can be extracted from line source measurements and used to independently subtract object scatter and subtract or restore detector scatter in high resolution PET. In this work, the dependence of the scatter components on energy threshold and source position was investigated. Line source measurements were acquired in multispectral mode using the Sherbrooke PET simulator. Scatter parameters were extracted from data summed in energy windows with a lower threshold varying from 129 keV to 516 keV in steps of 42 keV, and a fixed upper threshold of 644more » keV. Decreasing the lower threshold from 344 keV to 129 keV increases the trues by only 25%, but increases object scatter by 136% and almost triples detector scatter. A gain in efficiency by a factor of 2 more would result from recovering the latter by restoration in the broad window. The intensity and shape of the scatter functions for both object and detector are shown to have a significant dependence on energy and position. This dependence needs to be taken into account in the design of kernels for accurate scatter correction over a broad energy range.« less