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Title: SU-C-209-02: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Generation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models Derived From Clinical Patient Images

Abstract

Purpose: We develop a method to generate time varying volumetric images (3D fluoroscopic images) using patient-specific motion models derived from four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4DCBCT). Methods: Motion models are derived by selecting one 4DCBCT phase as a reference image, and registering the remaining images to it. Principal component analysis (PCA) is performed on the resultant displacement vector fields (DVFs) to create a reduced set of PCA eigenvectors that capture the majority of respiratory motion. 3D fluoroscopic images are generated by optimizing the weights of the PCA eigenvectors iteratively through comparison of measured cone-beam projections and simulated projections generated from the motion model. This method was applied to images from five lung-cancer patients. The spatial accuracy of this method is evaluated by comparing landmark positions in the 3D fluoroscopic images to manually defined ground truth positions in the patient cone-beam projections. Results: 4DCBCT motion models were shown to accurately generate 3D fluoroscopic images when the patient cone-beam projections contained clearly visible structures moving with respiration (e.g., the diaphragm). When no moving anatomical structure was clearly visible in the projections, the 3D fluoroscopic images generated did not capture breathing deformations, and reverted to the reference image. For the subset of 3D fluoroscopic imagesmore » generated from projections with visibly moving anatomy, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.6 mm and 3.1 mm respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic images can accurately capture respiratory deformations in a patient dataset, so long as the cone-beam projections used contain visible structures that move with respiration. For clinical implementation of 3D fluoroscopic imaging for treatment verification, an imaging field of view (FOV) that contains visible structures moving with respiration should be selected. If no other appropriate structures are visible, the images should include the diaphragm. This project was supported, in part, through a Master Research Agreement with Varian Medical Systems, Inc, Palo Alto, CA.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Brigham and Women’s Hospital / Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)
  2. William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)
  3. University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624346
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; ANATOMY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DATASETS; DEFORMATION; DIAPHRAGM; EIGENVECTORS; ERRORS; IMAGES; ITERATIVE METHODS; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; RESPIRATION

Citation Formats

Dhou, S, Cai, W, Hurwitz, M, Williams, C, Ionascu, D, and Lewis, J. SU-C-209-02: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Generation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models Derived From Clinical Patient Images. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955591.
Dhou, S, Cai, W, Hurwitz, M, Williams, C, Ionascu, D, & Lewis, J. SU-C-209-02: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Generation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models Derived From Clinical Patient Images. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955591.
Dhou, S, Cai, W, Hurwitz, M, Williams, C, Ionascu, D, and Lewis, J. 2016. "SU-C-209-02: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Generation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models Derived From Clinical Patient Images". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955591.
@article{osti_22624346,
title = {SU-C-209-02: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Generation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models Derived From Clinical Patient Images},
author = {Dhou, S and Cai, W and Hurwitz, M and Williams, C and Ionascu, D and Lewis, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: We develop a method to generate time varying volumetric images (3D fluoroscopic images) using patient-specific motion models derived from four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4DCBCT). Methods: Motion models are derived by selecting one 4DCBCT phase as a reference image, and registering the remaining images to it. Principal component analysis (PCA) is performed on the resultant displacement vector fields (DVFs) to create a reduced set of PCA eigenvectors that capture the majority of respiratory motion. 3D fluoroscopic images are generated by optimizing the weights of the PCA eigenvectors iteratively through comparison of measured cone-beam projections and simulated projections generated from the motion model. This method was applied to images from five lung-cancer patients. The spatial accuracy of this method is evaluated by comparing landmark positions in the 3D fluoroscopic images to manually defined ground truth positions in the patient cone-beam projections. Results: 4DCBCT motion models were shown to accurately generate 3D fluoroscopic images when the patient cone-beam projections contained clearly visible structures moving with respiration (e.g., the diaphragm). When no moving anatomical structure was clearly visible in the projections, the 3D fluoroscopic images generated did not capture breathing deformations, and reverted to the reference image. For the subset of 3D fluoroscopic images generated from projections with visibly moving anatomy, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.6 mm and 3.1 mm respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic images can accurately capture respiratory deformations in a patient dataset, so long as the cone-beam projections used contain visible structures that move with respiration. For clinical implementation of 3D fluoroscopic imaging for treatment verification, an imaging field of view (FOV) that contains visible structures moving with respiration should be selected. If no other appropriate structures are visible, the images should include the diaphragm. This project was supported, in part, through a Master Research Agreement with Varian Medical Systems, Inc, Palo Alto, CA.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955591},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Respiratory-correlated cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images acquired immediately prior to treatment have the potential to represent patient motion patterns and anatomy during treatment, including both intra- and inter-fractional changes. We develop a method to generate patient-specific motion models based on 4DCBCT images acquired with existing clinical equipment and used to generate time varying volumetric images (3D fluoroscopic images) representing motion during treatment delivery. Methods: Motion models are derived by deformably registering each 4DCBCT phase to a reference phase, and performing principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated by optimizing the resulting PCAmore » coefficients iteratively through comparison of the cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging and digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from the motion model. Patient and physical phantom datasets are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization error compared to manually defined ground truth positions. Results: 4DCBCT-based motion models were derived and used to generate 3D fluoroscopic images at treatment time. For the patient datasets, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.57 and 3.13 respectively in subsets of four patient datasets. For the physical phantom datasets, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.14 and 2.78 respectively in two datasets. 4DCBCT motion models are shown to perform well in the context of generating 3D fluoroscopic images due to their ability to reproduce anatomical changes at treatment time. Conclusion: This study showed the feasibility of deriving 4DCBCT-based motion models and using them to generate 3D fluoroscopic images at treatment time in real clinical settings. 4DCBCT-based motion models were found to account for the 3D non-rigid motion of the patient anatomy during treatment and have the potential to localize tumor and other patient anatomical structures at treatment time even when inter-fractional changes occur. This project was supported, in part, through a Master Research Agreement with Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA. The project was also supported, in part, by Award Number R21CA156068 from the National Cancer Institute.« less
  • Purpose: 3D motion modeling derived from 4DCT images, taken days or weeks before treatment, cannot reliably represent patient anatomy on the day of treatment. We develop a method to generate motion models based on 4DCBCT acquired at the time of treatment, and apply the model to estimate 3D time-varying images (referred to as 3D fluoroscopic images). Methods: Motion models are derived through deformable registration between each 4DCBCT phase, and principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated based on cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging. PCA coefficients are optimized iteratively through comparison ofmore » these cone-beam projections and projections estimated based on the motion model. Digital phantoms reproducing ten patient motion trajectories, and a physical phantom with regular and irregular motion derived from measured patient trajectories, are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization, and the global voxel intensity difference compared to ground truth. Results: Experiments included: 1) assuming no anatomic or positioning changes between 4DCT and treatment time; and 2) simulating positioning and tumor baseline shifts at the time of treatment compared to 4DCT acquisition. 4DCBCT were reconstructed from the anatomy as seen at treatment time. In case 1) the tumor localization error and the intensity differences in ten patient were smaller using 4DCT-based motion model, possible due to superior image quality. In case 2) the tumor localization error and intensity differences were 2.85 and 0.15 respectively, using 4DCT-based motion models, and 1.17 and 0.10 using 4DCBCT-based models. 4DCBCT performed better due to its ability to reproduce daily anatomical changes. Conclusion: The study showed an advantage of 4DCBCT-based motion models in the context of 3D fluoroscopic images estimation. Positioning and tumor baseline shift uncertainties were mitigated by the 4DCBCT-based motion models, while they caused errors when using 4DCT-based motion models. Partially funded by Varian research grant.« less
  • Purpose: The goal of this study is to quantify the interfraction reproducibility of patient-specific motion models derived from 4DCBCT acquired on the day of treatment of lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients. Methods: Motion models are derived from patient 4DCBCT images acquired daily over 3–5 fractions of treatment by 1) applying deformable image registration between each 4DCBCT image and a reference phase from that day, resulting in a set of displacement vector fields (DVFs), and 2) performing principal component analysis (PCA) on the DVFs to derive a motion model. The motion model from the first day of treatment ismore » compared to motion models from each successive day of treatment to quantify variability in motion models generated from different days. Four SBRT patient datasets have been acquired thus far in this IRB approved study. Results: Fraction-specific motion models for each fraction and patient were derived and PCA eigenvectors and their associated eigenvalues are compared for each fraction. For the first patient dataset, the average root mean square error between the first two eigenvectors associated with the highest two eigenvalues, in four fractions was 0.1, while it was 0.25 between the last three PCA eigenvectors associated with the lowest three eigenvalues. It was found that the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of PCA motion models for each treatment fraction have variations and the first few eigenvectors are shown to be more stable across treatment fractions than others. Conclusion: Analysis of this dataset showed that the first two eigenvectors of the PCA patient-specific motion models derived from 4DCBCT were stable over the course of several treatment fractions. The third, fourth, and fifth eigenvectors had larger variations.« less
  • Purpose: To study the variability of patient-specific motion models derived from 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) images using different deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients. Methods: Motion models are derived by 1) applying DIR between each 4DCT image and a reference image, resulting in a set of displacement vector fields (DVFs), and 2) performing principal component analysis (PCA) on the DVFs, resulting in a motion model (a set of eigenvectors capturing the variations in the DVFs). Three DIR algorithms were used: 1) Demons, 2) Horn-Schunck, and 3) iterative optical flow. The motion models derived weremore » compared using patient 4DCT scans. Results: Motion models were derived and the variations were evaluated according to three criteria: 1) the average root mean square (RMS) difference which measures the absolute difference between the components of the eigenvectors, 2) the dot product between the eigenvectors which measures the angular difference between the eigenvectors in space, and 3) the Euclidean Model Norm (EMN), which is calculated by summing the dot products of an eigenvector with the first three eigenvectors from the reference motion model in quadrature. EMN measures how well an eigenvector can be reconstructed using another motion model derived using a different DIR algorithm. Results showed that comparing to a reference motion model (derived using the Demons algorithm), the eigenvectors of the motion model derived using the iterative optical flow algorithm has smaller RMS, larger dot product, and larger EMN values than those of the motion model derived using Horn-Schunck algorithm. Conclusion: The study showed that motion models vary depending on which DIR algorithms were used to derive them. The choice of a DIR algorithm may affect the accuracy of the resulting model, and it is important to assess the suitability of the algorithm chosen for a particular application. This project was supported, in part, through a Master Research Agreement with Varian Medical Systems, Inc, Palo Alto, CA.« less
  • Purpose: We have developed a method, called respiratory motion guided 4DCBCT (RMG-4DCBCT), in which the gantry speed and projection frequency are varied in response to the patient’s real-time respiratory signal to eliminate streaking artifacts and to suppress duplicate projections in 4DCBCT images. In 2015, we realized RMG-4DCBCT on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator with a mechanical relay to suppress projections and a potentiometer to adjust the gantry speed in response to the patient’s real-time respiratory signal. The aim of this study was to analyse the image quality to determine what can and cannot be controlled. Methods: Using RMG-4DCBCT, we acquiredmore » 40 (RMG-4DCBCT-40) and 60 (RMG-4DCBCT-60) equally spaced projections per respiratory phase of the CIRS dynamic thorax phantom with breathing periods from 2s to 8s and two breathing traces from lung cancer patients. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and edge response width (ERW) were used to compare image quality between RMG-4DCBCT and conventional 4DCBCT. Results: Regardless of the breathing period, for RMG-4DCBCT, the CNR is approximately 7 and 9 with RMG-4DCBCT-40 and RMG-4DCBCT-60 respectively. Conventional 4DCBCT has a CNR dropping from 20 down to 6 as the breathing period drops from 2s to 8s. With RMG-4DCBCT, the ERW, in the direction of phantom motion, ranges from 2.1mm to 2.5mm as the breathing period drops from 2s to 8s which compares to a higher range of 2.0mm to 2.5mm with conventional 4DCBCT. Images with similar quality to conventional 4DCBCT can be acquired with RMG-4DCBCT-40 which has a 70% reduction in imaging dose. Conclusion: The image contrast can be controlled with RMG-4DCBCT regardless of the patients breathing rate. However, although the image sharpness is better with RMG-4DCBCT, image sharpness has a small dependence on the breathing period; the accuracy of registration and segmentation will therefore vary with the patient’s breathing period. This project was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) project grant 1034060 and Cancer Australia grant number 1084566.« less