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Title: SU-C-207A-07: Cumulative 18F-FDG Uptake Histogram Relative to Radiation Dose Volume Histogram of Lung After IMRT Or PSPT and Their Association with Radiation Pneumonitis

Abstract

Purpose: To determine whether the difference in cumulative 18F-FDG uptake histogram of lung treated with either IMRT or PSPT is associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with inoperable stage II and III NSCLC. Methods: We analyzed 24 patients from a prospective randomized trial to compare IMRT (n=12) with vs. PSPT (n=12) for inoperable NSCLC. All patients underwent PET-CT imaging between 35 and 88 days post-therapy. Post-treatment PET-CT was aligned with planning 4D CT to establish a voxel-to-voxel correspondence between post-treatment PET and planning dose images. 18F-FDG uptake as a function of radiation dose to normal lung was obtained for each patient. Distribution of the standard uptake value (SUV) was analyzed using a volume histogram method. The image quantitative characteristics and DVH measures were correlated with clinical symptoms of pneumonitis. Results: Patients with RP were present in both groups: 5 in the IMRT and 6 in the PSPT. The analysis of cumulative SUV histograms showed significantly higher relative volumes of the normal lung having higher SUV uptake in the PSPT patients for both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases (VSUV=2: 10% for IMRT vs 16% for proton RT and VSUV=1: 10% for IMRT vs 23% for proton RT). In addition, the SUVmore » histograms for symptomatic cases in PSPT patients exhibited a significantly longer tail at the highest SUV. The absolute volume of the lung receiving the dose >70 Gy was larger in the PSPT patients. Conclusion: 18F-FDG uptake – radiation dose response correlates with RP in both groups of patients by means of the linear regression slope. SUV is higher for the PSPT patients for both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases. Higher uptake after PSPT patients is explained by larger volumes of the lung receiving high radiation dose.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)
  2. UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624342
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; FLUORINE 18; IMAGES; LUNGS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; PNEUMONITIS; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SYMPTOMS; UPTAKE

Citation Formats

Shusharina, N, Choi, N, Bortfeld, T, Liao, Z, and Mohan, R. SU-C-207A-07: Cumulative 18F-FDG Uptake Histogram Relative to Radiation Dose Volume Histogram of Lung After IMRT Or PSPT and Their Association with Radiation Pneumonitis. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955582.
Shusharina, N, Choi, N, Bortfeld, T, Liao, Z, & Mohan, R. SU-C-207A-07: Cumulative 18F-FDG Uptake Histogram Relative to Radiation Dose Volume Histogram of Lung After IMRT Or PSPT and Their Association with Radiation Pneumonitis. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955582.
Shusharina, N, Choi, N, Bortfeld, T, Liao, Z, and Mohan, R. 2016. "SU-C-207A-07: Cumulative 18F-FDG Uptake Histogram Relative to Radiation Dose Volume Histogram of Lung After IMRT Or PSPT and Their Association with Radiation Pneumonitis". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955582.
@article{osti_22624342,
title = {SU-C-207A-07: Cumulative 18F-FDG Uptake Histogram Relative to Radiation Dose Volume Histogram of Lung After IMRT Or PSPT and Their Association with Radiation Pneumonitis},
author = {Shusharina, N and Choi, N and Bortfeld, T and Liao, Z and Mohan, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine whether the difference in cumulative 18F-FDG uptake histogram of lung treated with either IMRT or PSPT is associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with inoperable stage II and III NSCLC. Methods: We analyzed 24 patients from a prospective randomized trial to compare IMRT (n=12) with vs. PSPT (n=12) for inoperable NSCLC. All patients underwent PET-CT imaging between 35 and 88 days post-therapy. Post-treatment PET-CT was aligned with planning 4D CT to establish a voxel-to-voxel correspondence between post-treatment PET and planning dose images. 18F-FDG uptake as a function of radiation dose to normal lung was obtained for each patient. Distribution of the standard uptake value (SUV) was analyzed using a volume histogram method. The image quantitative characteristics and DVH measures were correlated with clinical symptoms of pneumonitis. Results: Patients with RP were present in both groups: 5 in the IMRT and 6 in the PSPT. The analysis of cumulative SUV histograms showed significantly higher relative volumes of the normal lung having higher SUV uptake in the PSPT patients for both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases (VSUV=2: 10% for IMRT vs 16% for proton RT and VSUV=1: 10% for IMRT vs 23% for proton RT). In addition, the SUV histograms for symptomatic cases in PSPT patients exhibited a significantly longer tail at the highest SUV. The absolute volume of the lung receiving the dose >70 Gy was larger in the PSPT patients. Conclusion: 18F-FDG uptake – radiation dose response correlates with RP in both groups of patients by means of the linear regression slope. SUV is higher for the PSPT patients for both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases. Higher uptake after PSPT patients is explained by larger volumes of the lung receiving high radiation dose.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955582},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Single dose-volume metrics are of limited value for the prediction of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in day-to-day clinical practice. We investigated whether multiparametric models that incorporate clinical and physiologic factors might have improved accuracy. Methods and Materials: The records of 160 patients who received radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer were reviewed. All patients were treated to the same dose and with an identical technique. Dosimetric, pulmonary function, and clinical parameters were analyzed to determine their ability to predict for the subsequent development of RP. Results: Twenty-seven patients (17%) developed RP. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly correlatedmore » with the risk of pneumonitis: fractional volume of lung receiving >5-20 Gy, absolute volume of lung spared from receiving >5-15 Gy, mean lung dose, craniocaudal position of the isocenter, transfer coefficient for carbon monoxide (KCOc), total lung capacity, coadministration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and coadministration of angiotensin receptor antagonists. By combining the absolute volume of lung spared from receiving >5 Gy with the KCOc, we defined a new parameter termed Transfer Factor Spared from receiving >5 Gy (TFS{sub 5}). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for TFS{sub 5} was 0.778, increasing to 0.846 if patients receiving modulators of the renin-angiotensin system were excluded from the analysis. Patients with a TFS{sub 5} <2.17 mmol/min/kPa had a risk of RP of 30% compared with 5% for the group with a TFS{sub 5} {>=}2.17. Conclusions: TFS{sub 5} represents a simple parameter that can be used in routine clinical practice to more accurately segregate patients into high- and low-risk groups for developing RP.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the relationship between various parameters derived from lung dose-volume histogram analysis and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients undergoing radical radiotherapy for primary lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 156 patients with lung cancer who had been treated with radical radiotherapy ({>=}45 Gy) and for whom dose-volume histogram data were available were reviewed. The incidence of symptomatic RP was correlated with a variety of parameters derived from the dose-volume histogram data, including the volume of lung receiving 10 Gy (V{sub 10}) through 50 Gy (V{sub 50}) and the mean lung dose (MLD).more » Results: The rate of RP at 6 months was 15% (95% confidence interval 9-22%). On univariate analysis, only V{sub 30} (p = 0.036) and MLD (p = 0.043) were statistically significantly related to RP. V{sub 30} correlated highly positively with MLD (r = 0.96, p < 0.001). Conclusion: V{sub 30} and MLD can be used to predict the risk of RP in lung cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was twofold: to determine whether the dose-volume metrics are valuable in predicting radiation pneumonitis (RP) in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients treated with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy (AHFRT + CT); and to clarify how AHFRT influences the risk of RP in comparison to conventional once-daily radiotherapy and chemotherapy (QDRT + CT). Methods and Materials: Study subjects were 43 patients with SCLC treated with AHFRT + CT. Radiotherapy was delivered at 1.5 Gy/fraction (fr) twice daily to 45 Gy/30 fr/3 weeks. We analyzed the relation between RP incidence and several dosimetric factors. We alsomore » compared this series data with our previously published data from lung cancer patients treated with QDRT + CT. Results: Radiation pneumonitis Grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed in 28 patients, 7 patients, and 1 patient, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that the percentage of lung volume receiving more than 15 Gy, 20 Gy, and 30 Gy (V15, V20, V30) and normal tissue complication probability were of predictive value for the development of RP. The 12-month cumulative incidences of RP greater than Grade 2 were 0%, 7.1%, 25%, and 42.9% in patients with a V20 of {<=}20%, 21-25%, 26-30%, and {>=}31%, respectively. These incidences were lower than that of our patients treated with QDRT + CT. Conclusions: Dosimetric factors are valuable in predicting RP in SCLC patients treated with AHFRT + CT. Regarding the incidence of RP, AHFRT appears to have some advantage over QDRT.« less
  • Purpose: To study the relationship between fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in pulmonary tissue after radical radiation therapy (RT) and the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: In 88 consecutive patients, {sup 18}F-FDG-positron emission tomography was performed at a median of 70 days after completion of RT. Patients received 60 Gy in 30 fractions, and all but 15 had concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. RT-induced pulmonary inflammatory changes occurring within the radiation treatment volume were scored, using a visual (0 to 3) radiotoxicity grading scale, by an observer blinded to the presence or absence of clinical radiation pneumonitis. Radiation pneumonitis wasmore » retrospectively graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale by an observer blinded to the PET radiotoxicity score. Results: There was a significant association between the worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring at any time after RT and the positron emission tomograph (PET) radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.033). The worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring after the PET scan was also associated with the PET radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.035). For every one-level increase in the PET toxicity scale, the risk of a higher RTOG radiation pneumonitis score increased by approximately 40%. The PET radiotoxicity score showed no significant correlation with the duration of radiation pneumonitis. Conclusions: The intensity of FDG uptake in pulmonary tissue after RT determined using a simple visual scoring system showed significant correlation with the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET may be useful in the prediction, diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of radiation pneumonitis.« less
  • Purpose: To identify dose-volume factors associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 74 patients who underwent SBRT for primary lung cancer. The prescribed dose for SBRT was uniformly 48 Gy in four fractions at the isocenter. RP was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v.3. Symptomatic RP was defined as grade 2 or worse. Optimal cut-offs dividing the patient population into two subgroups based on the incidence of symptomatic RP were sought using the following dose-volume metrics: PTV volume (ml), mean lungmore » dose (Gy), and V5, V10, V15, V20, V25, V30, V35, and V40 (%) of both lungs excluding the PTV. Results: With a median follow-up duration of 31.4 months, symptomatic RP was observed in 15 patients (20.3%), including 1 patient with grade 3. Optimal cut-offs for pulmonary dose-volume metrics were V25 and V20. These two factors were highly correlated with each other, and V25 was more significant. Symptomatic RP was observed in 14.8% of the patients with V25 <4.2%, and the rate was 46.2% in the remainder (p = 0.019). PTV volume was another significant factor. The symptomatic RP rate was significantly lower in the group with PTV <37.7 ml compared with the larger PTV group (11.1% vs. 34.5%, p = 0.020). The patients were divided into three subgroups (patients with PTV <37.7 ml; patients with, PTV {>=}37.7 ml and V25 <4.2%; and patients with PTV {>=}37.7 ml and V25 {>=}4.2%); the incidence of RP grade 2 or worse was 11.1%, 23.5%, and 50.0%, respectively (p = 0.013). Conclusions: Lung V25 and PTV volume were significant factors associated with RP after SBRT.« less