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Title: SU-C-BRB-02: Automatic Planning as a Potential Strategy for Dose Escalation for Pancreas SBRT?

Abstract

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been suggested to provide high rates of local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the close proximity of highly radiosensitive normal tissues usually causes the labor-intensive planning process, and may impede further escalation of the prescription dose. The present study evaluates the potential of an automatic planning system as a dose escalation strategy. Methods: Ten pancreatic cancer patients treated with SBRT were studied retrospectively. SBRT was delivered over 5 consecutive fractions with 6 ∼ 8Gy/fraction. Two plans were generated by Pinnacle Auto-Planning with the original prescription and escalated prescription, respectively. Escalated prescription adds 1 Gy/fraction to the original prescription. Manually-created planning volumes were excluded in the optimization goals in order to assess the planning efficiency and quality simultaneously. Critical organs with closest proximity were used to determine the plan normalization to ensure the OAR sparing. Dosimetric parameters including D100, and conformity index (CI) were assessed. Results: Auto-plans directly generate acceptable plans for 70% of the cases without necessity of further improvement, and two more iterations at most are necessary for the rest of the cases. For the pancreas SBRT plans with the original prescription, autoplans resulted in favorable target coverage and PTVmore » conformity (D100 = 96.3% ± 1.48%; CI = 0.88 ± 0.06). For the plans with the escalated prescriptions, no significant target under-dosage was observed, and PTV conformity remains reasonable (D100 = 93.3% ± 3.8%, and CI = 0.84 ± 0.05). Conclusion: Automatic planning, without substantial human-intervention process, results in reasonable PTV coverage and PTV conformity on the premise of adequate OAR sparing for the pancreas SBRT plans with escalated prescription. The results highlight the potential of autoplanning as a dose escalation strategy for pancreas SBRT treatment planning. Further investigations with a larger number of patients are necessary. The project is partially supported by Philips Medical Systems.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22624320
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ANIMAL TISSUES; CRITICAL ORGANS; MANPOWER; NEOPLASMS; OPTIMIZATION; PANCREAS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Wang, S, Zheng, D, Ma, R, Lin, C, Zhu, X, Lei, Y, Enke, C, and Zhou, S. SU-C-BRB-02: Automatic Planning as a Potential Strategy for Dose Escalation for Pancreas SBRT?. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4955556.
Wang, S, Zheng, D, Ma, R, Lin, C, Zhu, X, Lei, Y, Enke, C, & Zhou, S. SU-C-BRB-02: Automatic Planning as a Potential Strategy for Dose Escalation for Pancreas SBRT?. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955556.
Wang, S, Zheng, D, Ma, R, Lin, C, Zhu, X, Lei, Y, Enke, C, and Zhou, S. 2016. "SU-C-BRB-02: Automatic Planning as a Potential Strategy for Dose Escalation for Pancreas SBRT?". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4955556.
@article{osti_22624320,
title = {SU-C-BRB-02: Automatic Planning as a Potential Strategy for Dose Escalation for Pancreas SBRT?},
author = {Wang, S and Zheng, D and Ma, R and Lin, C and Zhu, X and Lei, Y and Enke, C and Zhou, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been suggested to provide high rates of local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the close proximity of highly radiosensitive normal tissues usually causes the labor-intensive planning process, and may impede further escalation of the prescription dose. The present study evaluates the potential of an automatic planning system as a dose escalation strategy. Methods: Ten pancreatic cancer patients treated with SBRT were studied retrospectively. SBRT was delivered over 5 consecutive fractions with 6 ∼ 8Gy/fraction. Two plans were generated by Pinnacle Auto-Planning with the original prescription and escalated prescription, respectively. Escalated prescription adds 1 Gy/fraction to the original prescription. Manually-created planning volumes were excluded in the optimization goals in order to assess the planning efficiency and quality simultaneously. Critical organs with closest proximity were used to determine the plan normalization to ensure the OAR sparing. Dosimetric parameters including D100, and conformity index (CI) were assessed. Results: Auto-plans directly generate acceptable plans for 70% of the cases without necessity of further improvement, and two more iterations at most are necessary for the rest of the cases. For the pancreas SBRT plans with the original prescription, autoplans resulted in favorable target coverage and PTV conformity (D100 = 96.3% ± 1.48%; CI = 0.88 ± 0.06). For the plans with the escalated prescriptions, no significant target under-dosage was observed, and PTV conformity remains reasonable (D100 = 93.3% ± 3.8%, and CI = 0.84 ± 0.05). Conclusion: Automatic planning, without substantial human-intervention process, results in reasonable PTV coverage and PTV conformity on the premise of adequate OAR sparing for the pancreas SBRT plans with escalated prescription. The results highlight the potential of autoplanning as a dose escalation strategy for pancreas SBRT treatment planning. Further investigations with a larger number of patients are necessary. The project is partially supported by Philips Medical Systems.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4955556},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To determine how much the radiation dose to lung tumors could be increased as the margins used to generate planning target volume (PTV) are reduced. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 18 patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma were retrospectively generated. Dose escalation was performed in two phases: The dose was increased as long as healthy tissue dose-volume constraints did not exceed (1) the values from the treatment plan originally used for the patients and (2) clinically acceptable values. Results: No correlation of dose escalation was observed with tumor location, tumor stage, tumor motion, and tumor volume. An increase inmore » dose was observed for many of the patients with as little as 2-mm uniform reduction in PTV margin, with increases in mean PTV dose exceeding 15 Gy for 5 patients. Sixteen of 18 patients experienced a decrease in mean heart, esophagus, and lung dose when margins were reduced and prescription doses were increased. Conclusions: Reduced margins allowed an increased dose to the tumors. However, a much larger dose escalation was possible for some patients but not for others, demonstrating that each patient is different, so individual treatment plans must be tailored for maximum tumor coverage and minimum exposure of healthy tissue.« less
  • Purpose: Triapine, a novel inhibitor of the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RR), is a potent radiosensitizer. This phase 1 study, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, assessed the safety and tolerability of triapine in combination with radiation (RT) in patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer (LAPCA). Methods and Materials: We evaluated 3 dosage levels of triapine (24 mg/m{sup 2}, 48 mg/m{sup 2}, 72 mg/m{sup 2}) administered with 50.4 Gy of RT in 28 fractions. Patients with LAPCA received triapine thrice weekly, every other week during the course of RT. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was assessed duringmore » RT and for 4 weeks after its completion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and serum RR levels were evaluated as potential predictors for early response. Results: Twelve patients were treated. Four patients (1 nonevaluable) were enrolled at dosage level 1 (DL1), 3 patients at DL2, and 5 patients (2 nonevaluable) at DL3. No DLTs were observed, and the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Two patients (17%) achieved partial response, and 6 patients (50%) had stable disease. One patient underwent R0 resection after therapy. Ninety-two percent of patients (100% at DL3) experienced freedom from local tumor progression. In 75% of patients who eventually experienced progression, metastases developed without local progression. RR levels did not seem to predict outcome. In 4 patients with available data, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging may predict early response or resistance to therapy. Conclusion: The combination of triapine at 72 mg/m{sup 2} 3 times weekly every other week and standard RT is tolerable with interesting activity in patients with LAPCA.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three pulmonary metastases from a solid tumor, cumulative tumor diameter <7 cm, and adequate pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s {>=}1.0 L). The planning target volume (PTV) was typically constructed from the gross tumor volume (GTV) by adding a 5-mm radial and 10-mm craniocaudal margin. The first cohort received 48 Gy to the PTV in three fractions (F). SBRT dose was escalated in subsequent cohorts upmore » to a preselected maximum of 60 Gy/3 F. The percent of normal lung receiving more than 15 Gy (V{sub 15}) was restricted to less than 35%. Respiratory control and a dynamic conformal arc SBRT technique were used. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 lung or esophageal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity within 3 months. After the Phase I dose escalation, the trial continued as a Phase II study, and patients in this cohort are included to increase the number of patients evaluable for early toxicity assessment. Results: Twenty-five eligible patients have been enrolled to date. In the Phase I component of the trial, there were 12 patients (7 male, 5 female): median age, 55 years (range, 31-83 years); the most common primary site was colorectal (4 patients). Seven patients had two lung lesions, and 1 patient had three lesions. The median aggregate volume of all GTVs was 18.7 mL (range, 2-40 mL). No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3 F without reaching the MTD; including the additional Phase II cohort patients, 16 patients have been treated to a dose of 60 Gy/3F without experiencing a DLT in the first 3 months. The equivalent uniform dose to the GTV in the highest dose group ranged from 66 to 77 Gy in 3 F. Conclusions: In patients with limited pulmonary metastases, radiobiologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated with minimal early toxicity. A Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy/3 F for lung metastases is ongoing to evaluate local tumor control rates with this regimen and continue surveillance for any late effects.« less
  • Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become an established treatment option for liver cancer. For patients with large tumors, the prescription dose is often limited by constraints on the mean liver dose, leading to tumor recurrence. In this work, we demonstrate that spatiotemporal fractionation schemes, ie delivering distinct dose distributions in different fractions, may allow for a 10% increase in biologically effective dose (BED) in the tumor compared to current practice where each fraction delivers the same dose distribution. Methods: We consider rotation therapy delivered with x-ray beams. Treatment plan optimization is performed using objective functions evaluated for the cumulativemore » BED delivered at the end of treatment. This allows for simultaneously optimizing multiple distinct treatment plans for different fractions. Results: The treatment that optimally exploits fractionation effects is designed such that each fraction delivers a similar dose bath to the uninvolved liver while delivering high single fraction doses to complementary parts of the target volume. Thereby, partial hypofractionation in the tumor is achieved along with near uniform fractionation in the surrounding liver - leading to an improvement in the therapeutic ratio. The benefit of such spatiotemporal fractionation schemes depends on tumor geometry and location as well as the number of fractions. For 5-fraction treatments (allowing for 5 distinct dose distributions) an improvement in the order of 10% is observed. Conclusion: Delivering distinct dose distributions in different fractions, purely motivated by fractionation effects rather than geometric changes, may improve the therapeutic ratio. For treatment sites where the prescriptions dose is limited by mean dose constraints in the surrounding organ, such as liver cancer, this approach may facilitate biological dose escalation and improved cure rates.« less
  • Purpose: To optimize radiation dose efficiency in CT while maintaining image quality, it is important to select the optimal tube potential. The selection of optimal tube potential, however, is highly dependent on patient size and diagnostic task. The purpose of this work was to develop a general strategy that allows for automatic tube potential selection for each individual patient and each diagnostic task. Methods: The authors propose a general strategy that allows automatic adaptation of the tube potential as a function of patient size and diagnostic task, using a novel index of image quality, ''iodine contrast to noise ratio withmore » a noise constraint (iCNR{sub N}C),'' to characterize the different image quality requirements by various clinical applications. The relative dose factor (RDF) at each tube potential to achieve a target image quality was then determined as a function of patient size and the noise constraint parameter. A workflow was developed to automatically identify the optimal tube potential that is both dose efficient and practically feasible, incorporating patient size and diagnostic task. An experimental study using a series of semianthropomorphic thoracic phantoms was used to demonstrate how the proposed general strategy can be implemented and how the radiation dose reduction achievable by the tube potential selection depends on phantom sizes and noise constraint parameters. Results: The proposed strategy provides a flexible and quantitative way to select the optimal tube potential based on the patient size and diagnostic task. The noise constraint parameter {alpha} can be adapted for different clinical applications. For example, {alpha}=1 for noncontrast routine exams; {alpha}=1.1-1.25 for contrast-enhanced routine exams; and {alpha}=1.5-2.0 for CT angiography. For the five thoracic phantoms in the experiment, when {alpha}=1, the optimal tube potentials were 80, 100, 100, 120, 120, respectively. The corresponding RDFs (relative to 120 kV) were 78.0%, 90.9%, 95.2%, 100%, and 100%. When {alpha}=1.5, the optimal tube potentials were 80, 80, 80, 100, 100, respectively, with corresponding RDFs of 34.7%, 44.7%, 54.7%, 60.8%, and 89.5%. Conclusions: A general strategy to automatically select the most dose efficient tube potential for CT exams was developed that takes into account patient size and diagnostic task. Dependent on the patient size and the selection of noise constraint parameter for different diagnostic tasks, the dose reduction at each tube potential, quantified explicitly with the RDF, varies significantly.« less