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Title: High-precision measurements of the compressibility of chalcogenide glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 9 GPa

Abstract

The volumes of glassy germanium chalcogenides GeSe{sub 2}, GeS{sub 2}, Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83}, and Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} are precisely measured at a hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa. The stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} and GeS{sub 2} glasses exhibit elastic behavior in the pressure range up to 3 GPa, and their bulk modulus decreases at pressures higher than 2–2.5 GPa. At higher pressures, inelastic relaxation processes begin and their intensity is proportional to the logarithm of time. The relaxation rate for the GeSe{sub 2} glasses has a pronounced maximum at 3.5–4.5 GPa, which indicates the existence of several parallel structural transformation mechanisms. The nonstoichiometric glasses exhibit a diffuse transformation and inelastic behavior at pressures above 1–2 GPa. The maximum relaxation rate in these glasses is significantly lower than that in the stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} glasses. All glasses are characterized by the “loss of memory” of history: after relaxation at a fixed pressure, the further increase in the pressure returns the volume to the compression curve obtained without a stop for relaxation. After pressure release, the residual densification in the stoichiometric glasses is about 7% and that in the Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83} glasses is 1.5%. The volume of the Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} glassmore » returns to its initial value within the limits of experimental error. As the pressure decreases, the effective bulk moduli of the Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83} and Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} glasses coincide with the moduli after isobaric relaxation at the stage of increasing pressure, and the bulk modulus of the stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} glass upon decreasing pressure noticeably exceeds the bulk modulus after isobaric relaxation at the stage of increasing pressure. Along with the reported data, our results can be used to draw conclusions regarding the diffuse transformations in glassy germanium chalcogenides during compression.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Vereshchagin Institute of High-Pressure Physics (Russian Federation)
  2. Universite du Littoral, LPCA, UMR 8101 CNRS (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22617205
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics; Journal Volume: 123; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Pleiades Publishing, Inc.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ACCURACY; CHALCOGENIDES; COMPRESSIBILITY; COMPRESSION; ERRORS; GERMANIUM COMPOUNDS; GERMANIUM SELENIDES; GERMANIUM SULFIDES; GLASS; HYDROSTATICS; PRESSURE RANGE GIGA PA; PRESSURE RELEASE; RELAXATION; STOICHIOMETRY

Citation Formats

Brazhkin, V. V., E-mail: brazhkin@hppi.troitsk.ru, Bychkov, E., and Tsiok, O. B. High-precision measurements of the compressibility of chalcogenide glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 9 GPa. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063776116060108.
Brazhkin, V. V., E-mail: brazhkin@hppi.troitsk.ru, Bychkov, E., & Tsiok, O. B. High-precision measurements of the compressibility of chalcogenide glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 9 GPa. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063776116060108.
Brazhkin, V. V., E-mail: brazhkin@hppi.troitsk.ru, Bychkov, E., and Tsiok, O. B. Mon . "High-precision measurements of the compressibility of chalcogenide glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 9 GPa". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063776116060108.
@article{osti_22617205,
title = {High-precision measurements of the compressibility of chalcogenide glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 9 GPa},
author = {Brazhkin, V. V., E-mail: brazhkin@hppi.troitsk.ru and Bychkov, E. and Tsiok, O. B.},
abstractNote = {The volumes of glassy germanium chalcogenides GeSe{sub 2}, GeS{sub 2}, Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83}, and Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} are precisely measured at a hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa. The stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} and GeS{sub 2} glasses exhibit elastic behavior in the pressure range up to 3 GPa, and their bulk modulus decreases at pressures higher than 2–2.5 GPa. At higher pressures, inelastic relaxation processes begin and their intensity is proportional to the logarithm of time. The relaxation rate for the GeSe{sub 2} glasses has a pronounced maximum at 3.5–4.5 GPa, which indicates the existence of several parallel structural transformation mechanisms. The nonstoichiometric glasses exhibit a diffuse transformation and inelastic behavior at pressures above 1–2 GPa. The maximum relaxation rate in these glasses is significantly lower than that in the stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} glasses. All glasses are characterized by the “loss of memory” of history: after relaxation at a fixed pressure, the further increase in the pressure returns the volume to the compression curve obtained without a stop for relaxation. After pressure release, the residual densification in the stoichiometric glasses is about 7% and that in the Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83} glasses is 1.5%. The volume of the Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} glass returns to its initial value within the limits of experimental error. As the pressure decreases, the effective bulk moduli of the Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83} and Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} glasses coincide with the moduli after isobaric relaxation at the stage of increasing pressure, and the bulk modulus of the stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} glass upon decreasing pressure noticeably exceeds the bulk modulus after isobaric relaxation at the stage of increasing pressure. Along with the reported data, our results can be used to draw conclusions regarding the diffuse transformations in glassy germanium chalcogenides during compression.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063776116060108},
journal = {Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 123,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Tmore » he compression behavior of synthetic magnesium- (Mg-) yttrium (Y) garnet Mg 3 Y 2 (SiO 4 ) 3 has been investigated upto about 8.79 GPa at 300 K using in situ angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell at the beamline X17C, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. No phase transition has been observed within the pressure range investigated. he unit-cell parameters and volume decreased systematically with increasing pressure, and a reliable isothermal bulk modulus ( K 0 ) and its pressure derivative ( K 0 ) were obtained in this study. he values of zero-pressure volume V 0 , K 0 , and K 0 refined with a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state are V 0 = 1727.9 ± 0.2  Å 3 , K 0 = 145 ± 3  GPa, and K 0 = 8.5 ± 0.9 . If K 0 is fixed at 4, K 0 is obtained as 158 ± 2  GPa.« less
    Cited by 1
  • Lead bromapatite [Pb{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}Br{sub 2}] has been synthesized via solid-state reaction at pressures up to 1.0 GPa, and its structure determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at ambient temperature and pressure. The large bromide anion is accommodated in the c-axis channel by lateral displacements of structural elements, particularly of Pb2 cations and PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The compressibility of bromapatite was also investigated up to about 20.7 GPa at ambient temperature, using a diamond-anvil cell and synchrotron X-ray radiation. The compressibility of lead bromapatite is significantly different from that of lead fluorapatite. The pressure-volume data of lead bromapatite (P <more » 10 GPa) fitted to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation yield an isothermal bulk modulus (K{sub T}) of 49.8(16) GPa and first pressure derivative (K{sub T}) of 10.1(10). If K{sub T} is fixed at 4, the derived K{sub T} is 60.8(11) GPa. The relative difference of the bulk moduli of these two lead apatites is thus about 12%, which is about two times the relative difference of the bulk moduli ({approx}5%) of the calcium apatites fluorapatite [Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}F{sub 2}], chlorapatite [Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}] and hydroxylapatite [Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}]. Another interesting feature apparently related to the replacement of F by Br in lead apatite is the switch in the principle axes of the strain ellipsoid: the c-axis is less compressible than the a-axis in lead bromapatite but more compressible in lead fluorapatite.« less