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Title: SU-F-T-647: Linac-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: Detailed Description of SRS Procedural Technique and Reported Clinical Outcomes

Abstract

Purpose: SRS is an effective non-invasive alternative treatment modality with minimal-toxicity used to treat patients with medically/surgically refractory trigeminal neuralgia root(TNR) or those who may not tolerate surgical intervention. We present our linac-based SRS procedure for TNR treatment and simultaneously report our clinical outcomes. Methods: Twenty-eight TNR-patients treated with frame-based SRS at our institution (2009–2015) with a single-fraction point-dose of 60-80Gy to TNR were included in this IRB-approved study. Experienced neurosurgeon and radiation oncologist delineated the TNR on 1.0mm thin 3D-FIESTA-MRI that was co-registered with 0.7mm thin planning-CT. Treatment plans were generated in iPlan (BrainLAB) with a 4-mm diameter cone using 79 arcs with differential-weighting for Novalis-TX 6MV-SRS(1000MU/min) beam and optimized to minimize brainstem dose. Winston-Lutz test was performed before each treatment delivery with sub-millimeter isocenter accuracy. Quality assurance of frame placement was maintained by helmet-bobble-measurement before simulation-CT and before patient setup at treatment couch. OBI-CBCT scan was performed for patient setup verification without applying shifts. On clinical follow up, treatment response was assessed using Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity Score(BNI-score:I–V). Results: 26/28 TNR-patients (16-males/10-females) who were treated with following single-fraction point-dose to isocenter: 80Gy(n=22),75Gy(n=1),70Gy(n=2) and 60Gy(n=1, re-treatment) were followed up. Median follow-up interval was 8.5-months (ranged:1–48.5months). Median age wasmore » 70-yr (ranged:43–93-yr). Right/left TNR ratio was 15/11. Delivered total # of average MUs was 19034±1204. Average beam-on-time: 19.0±1.3min. Brainstem max-dose and dose to 0.5cc were 13.3±2.4Gy (ranged:8.1–16.5Gy) and 3.6±0.4Gy (ranged:3.0–4.9Gy). On average, max-dose to optic-apparatus was ≤1.2Gy. Mean value of max-dose to eyes/lens was 0.26Gy/0.11Gy. Overall, 20-patients (77%) responded to treatment: 5(19%) achieved complete pain relief without medication (BNI score: I); 5(19%) had no-pain, decreased medication (BNI-score:II); 2(7.7%) had no-pain, but, continued medication (BNI-score:IIIA), and 8(30.8%) had pain that was well controlled by medication (BNI-score: IIIB). Six-patients (23.0%) did not respond to treatment (BNI-score:IV–V). Neither cranial nerve deficit nor radio-necrosis of temporal lobe was clinically observed. Conclusion: Linac-based SRS for medically/surgically refractory TNR provided an effective treatment option for pain resolution/control with very minimal if any normal tissue toxicity. Longer follow up of these patients is anticipated/needed to confirm our observations.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22617035
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; ANIMAL TISSUES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CRYSTALLINE LENS; LETHAL DOSES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; NECROSIS; NMR IMAGING; PAIN; PATIENTS; QUALITY ASSURANCE; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Pokhrel, D, Sood, S, Badkul, R, Jiang, H, Stepp, T, Camarata, P, and Wang, F. SU-F-T-647: Linac-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: Detailed Description of SRS Procedural Technique and Reported Clinical Outcomes. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956832.
Pokhrel, D, Sood, S, Badkul, R, Jiang, H, Stepp, T, Camarata, P, & Wang, F. SU-F-T-647: Linac-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: Detailed Description of SRS Procedural Technique and Reported Clinical Outcomes. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956832.
Pokhrel, D, Sood, S, Badkul, R, Jiang, H, Stepp, T, Camarata, P, and Wang, F. 2016. "SU-F-T-647: Linac-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: Detailed Description of SRS Procedural Technique and Reported Clinical Outcomes". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956832.
@article{osti_22617035,
title = {SU-F-T-647: Linac-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: Detailed Description of SRS Procedural Technique and Reported Clinical Outcomes},
author = {Pokhrel, D and Sood, S and Badkul, R and Jiang, H and Stepp, T and Camarata, P and Wang, F},
abstractNote = {Purpose: SRS is an effective non-invasive alternative treatment modality with minimal-toxicity used to treat patients with medically/surgically refractory trigeminal neuralgia root(TNR) or those who may not tolerate surgical intervention. We present our linac-based SRS procedure for TNR treatment and simultaneously report our clinical outcomes. Methods: Twenty-eight TNR-patients treated with frame-based SRS at our institution (2009–2015) with a single-fraction point-dose of 60-80Gy to TNR were included in this IRB-approved study. Experienced neurosurgeon and radiation oncologist delineated the TNR on 1.0mm thin 3D-FIESTA-MRI that was co-registered with 0.7mm thin planning-CT. Treatment plans were generated in iPlan (BrainLAB) with a 4-mm diameter cone using 79 arcs with differential-weighting for Novalis-TX 6MV-SRS(1000MU/min) beam and optimized to minimize brainstem dose. Winston-Lutz test was performed before each treatment delivery with sub-millimeter isocenter accuracy. Quality assurance of frame placement was maintained by helmet-bobble-measurement before simulation-CT and before patient setup at treatment couch. OBI-CBCT scan was performed for patient setup verification without applying shifts. On clinical follow up, treatment response was assessed using Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity Score(BNI-score:I–V). Results: 26/28 TNR-patients (16-males/10-females) who were treated with following single-fraction point-dose to isocenter: 80Gy(n=22),75Gy(n=1),70Gy(n=2) and 60Gy(n=1, re-treatment) were followed up. Median follow-up interval was 8.5-months (ranged:1–48.5months). Median age was 70-yr (ranged:43–93-yr). Right/left TNR ratio was 15/11. Delivered total # of average MUs was 19034±1204. Average beam-on-time: 19.0±1.3min. Brainstem max-dose and dose to 0.5cc were 13.3±2.4Gy (ranged:8.1–16.5Gy) and 3.6±0.4Gy (ranged:3.0–4.9Gy). On average, max-dose to optic-apparatus was ≤1.2Gy. Mean value of max-dose to eyes/lens was 0.26Gy/0.11Gy. Overall, 20-patients (77%) responded to treatment: 5(19%) achieved complete pain relief without medication (BNI score: I); 5(19%) had no-pain, decreased medication (BNI-score:II); 2(7.7%) had no-pain, but, continued medication (BNI-score:IIIA), and 8(30.8%) had pain that was well controlled by medication (BNI-score: IIIB). Six-patients (23.0%) did not respond to treatment (BNI-score:IV–V). Neither cranial nerve deficit nor radio-necrosis of temporal lobe was clinically observed. Conclusion: Linac-based SRS for medically/surgically refractory TNR provided an effective treatment option for pain resolution/control with very minimal if any normal tissue toxicity. Longer follow up of these patients is anticipated/needed to confirm our observations.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956832},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To analyze the effect of dose escalation on treatment outcome in patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed of 870 patients who underwent SRS for a diagnosis of TN from 2 institutions. Patients were typically treated using a single 4-mm isocenter placed at the trigeminal nerve dorsal root entry zone. Patients were divided into groups based on treatment doses: ≤82 Gy (352 patients), 83 to 86 Gy (85 patients), and ≥90 Gy (433 patients). Pain response was classified using a categorical scoring system, with fair or poor pain control representing treatment failure.more » Treatment-related facial numbness was classified using the Barrow Neurological Institute scale. Log-rank tests were performed to test differences in time to pain failure or development of facial numbness for patients treated with different doses. Results: Median age at first pain onset was 63 years, median age at time of SRS was 71 years, and median follow-up was 36.5 months from the time of SRS. A majority of patients (827, 95%) were clinically diagnosed with typical TN. The 4-year rate of excellent to good pain relief was 87% (95% confidence interval 84%-90%). The 4-year rate of pain response was 79%, 82%, and 92% in patients treated to ≤82 Gy, 83 to 86 Gy, and ≥90 Gy, respectively. Patients treated to doses ≤82 Gy had an increased risk of pain failure after SRS, compared with patients treated to ≥90 Gy (hazard ratio 2.0, P=.0007). Rates of treatment-related facial numbness were similar among patients treated to doses ≥83 Gy. Nine patients (1%) were diagnosed with anesthesia dolorosa. Conclusions: Dose escalation for TN to doses >82 Gy is associated with an improvement in response to treatment and duration of pain relief. Patients treated at these doses, however, should be counseled about the increased risk of treatment-related facial numbness.« less
  • Purpose: To assess efficacy and quality of life (QOL) outcomes associated with gamma-knife radiosurgery (GK-RS) in treating atypical trigeminal neuralgia (ATN) compared with classic trigeminal neuralgia (CTN). Methods and Materials: Between September 1996 and September 2004, 35 cases of ATN were treated with GK-RS. Patients were categorized into two groups: Group I comprised patients presenting with ATN (57%); Group II consisted of patients presenting with CTN then progressing to ATN (43%). Median prescription dose 75 Gy (range, 70-80 Gy) was delivered to trigeminal nerve root entry zone. Treatment efficacy and QOL improvements were assessed with a standardized questionnaire. Results: Withmore » median follow-up of 29 months (range, 3-74 months), 72% reported excellent/good outcomes, with mean time to relief of 5.8 weeks (range, 0-24 weeks) and mean duration of relief of 62 weeks (range, 1-163 weeks). This rate of pain relief is similar to rate achieved in our previously reported experience treating CTN with GK-RS (p = 0.36). There was a trend toward longer time to relief (p = 0.059), and shorter duration of relief (p = 0.067) in patients with ATN. There was no difference in rate of, time to, or duration of pain relief between Groups I and II. Of the patients with ATN, 88% discontinued or decreased the use of pain medications. Among the patients with sustained pain relief, QOL improved an average of 85%. Conclusion: This is the largest reported GK-RS experience for the treatment of ATN. Patients with ATN can achieve rates of pain relief similar to those in patients with CTN. Further follow-up is necessary to assess adequately the durability of response.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with surgically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN) treated with rescue gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients with typical TN received salvage GKRS between 1997 and 2002 at the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI). All patients had recurrent pain following at least one prior surgical intervention. Prior surgical interventions included percutaneous destructive procedures, microvascular decompression (MVD), or GKRS. Thirty-one (39%) had undergone at least two prior procedures. The most common salvage dose was 80 Gy, although 40-50 Gy was typical in patients who had received prior radiosurgery. Pain outcome was assessed usingmore » the BNI Pain Intensity Score, and quality of life was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Results: Median follow-up after salvage GKRS was 5.3 years. Actuarial analysis demonstrated that at 5 years, 20% of patients were pain-free and 50% had pain relief. Pain recurred in patients who had an initial response to GKRS at a median of 1.1 years. Twenty-eight (41%) required a subsequent surgical procedure for recurrence. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model suggested that the strongest predictor of GKRS failure was a history of prior MVD (p=0.029). There were no instances of serious morbidity or mortality. Ten percent of patients developed worsening facial numbness and 8% described their numbness as 'very bothersome.' Conclusions: GKRS salvage for refractory TN is well tolerated and results in long-term pain relief in approximately half the patients treated. Clinicians may reconsider using GKRS to salvage patients who have failed prior MVD.« less
  • Purpose: The efficiency of radiosurgery is related to its highly precise targeting. We assessed clinically the targeting accuracy of radiosurgical treatment with the Leksell Gamma Knife for trigeminal neuralgia. We also studied the applied radiation dose within the area of focal contrast enhancement on the trigeminal nerve root following radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: From an initial group of 78 patients with trigeminal neuralgia treated with gamma knife radiosurgery using a 90-Gy dose, we analyzed a subgroup of 65 patients for whom 6-month follow-up MRI showed focal contrast enhancement of the trigeminal nerve. Follow-up MRI was spatially coregistered to the radiosurgicalmore » planning MRI. Target accuracy was assessed from deviation of the coordinates of the intended target compared with the center of enhancement on postoperative MRI. Radiation dose delivered at the borders of contrast enhancement was evaluated. Results: The median deviation of the coordinates between the intended target and the center of contrast enhancement was 0.91 mm in Euclidean space. The radiation doses fitting within the borders of the contrast enhancement of the trigeminal nerve root ranged from 49 to 85 Gy (median value, 77 {+-} 8.7 Gy). Conclusions: The median deviation found in clinical assessment of gamma knife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia is low and compatible with its high rate of efficiency. Focal enhancement of the trigeminal nerve after radiosurgery occurred in 83% of our patients and was not associated with clinical outcome. Focal enhancement borders along the nerve root fit with a median dose of 77 {+-} 8.7 Gy.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate how the spatial relationship between the isocenters of the first and second radiosurgeries affects the overall outcome. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study on 40 patients who had repeat gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Only one 4-mm isocenter was applied in both first and second radiosurgeries, with a maximum radiation dose of 75 Gy and 40 Gy, respectively. The MR scan of the first radiosurgery was registered to that of the second radiosurgery by a landmark-based registration algorithm. The spatial relationship between the isocenter of the first andmore » the second radiosurgeries was thus determined. The investigating parameters were the distance between the isocenters of the two separate radiosurgeries and isocenter proximity to the brainstem. The outcome end points were pain relief and dysesthesias. The median follow-up for the repeat radiosurgery was 28 months (range, 6-51 months). Results: Pain relief was complete in 11 patients, nearly complete ({>=}90%) in 7 patients, partial ({>=}50%) in 8 patients, and minimal (<50%) or none in another 14 patients. The mean distance between the two isocenters was 2.86 mm in the complete or nearly complete pain relief group vs. 1.93 mm in the others. Farther distance between isocenters was associated with a trend toward better pain relief (p 0.057). The proximity of the second isocenter to the brainstem did not affect pain relief, and neither did placing the second isocenter proximal or distal to the brainstem compared with the first one. Three patients developed moderate dysesthesias (score of 4 on a 0-10 scale), and 2 other patients developed more significant dysesthesias (score of 7) after the second radiosurgery. Dysesthesias related neither to distance between isocenters nor to which isocenter was closer to the brainstem. Conclusions: Image registration between MR scans of the first and second radiosurgeries helps target delineation and radiosurgery treatment planning. Increasing the isocenter distance between the two radiosurgeries treated a longer segment of the trigeminal neuralgia nerve and was associated with a trend toward improved pain relief.« less