skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-F-T-526: A Comparative Study On Gating Efficiency of Varian RPM Device and Calypso System

Abstract

Purpose: In general, the linear accelerator is gated using respiratory signal obtained by way of external sensors to account for the breathing motion during radiotherapy. One of the commonly used gating devices is the Varian RPM device. Calypso system that uses electromagnetic tracking of implanted or surface transponders could also be used for gating. The aim of this study is to compare the gating efficiency of RPM device and the calypso system by phantom studies. Methods: An ArcCheck insert was used as the phantom with a Gafchromic film placed in its holder. The ArcCheck insert was placed on a Motion Sim platform and moved in the longitudinal direction simulating a respiratory motion with a period of 5 seconds and amplitude of ±6mm. The Gafchromic film was exposed to a 2 × 2cm{sup 2} field, i) with the phantom static, ii) phantom moving but ungated iii) gated with gating window of 2mm and 3mm. This was repeated with Calypso system using surface transponders with the same gating window. The Gafchromic films were read with an EPSON 11000 flatbed scanner and analysed with ‘Medphysto’ software. Results: The full width at half maximum (FWHM) as measured with film at the level of themore » film holder was 1.65cm when the phantom was static. FWHM measured with phantom moving and without gating was 1.16 cm and penumbra was 7 mm (80–20%) on both sides. When the beam was gated with 2 mm gating window the FWHM was 1.8 cm with RPM device and 1.9 cm with Calypso. Similarly, when the beam was gated with 3 mm window, the FWHM was 1.9cm with RPM device and 2cm with Calypso. Conclusion: This work suggests that the gating efficiency of RPM device is better than that of the Calypso with surface transponder, with reference to the latency in gating.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore (India)
  2. The Brunei Cancer Center (Brunei Darussalam)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22617034
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMPUTER CODES; FILMS; ION MICROPROBE ANALYSIS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; PHANTOMS; RADIOTHERAPY; SENSORS

Citation Formats

Ravindran, P, Wui Ann, W, and Lim, Y. SU-F-T-526: A Comparative Study On Gating Efficiency of Varian RPM Device and Calypso System. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956711.
Ravindran, P, Wui Ann, W, & Lim, Y. SU-F-T-526: A Comparative Study On Gating Efficiency of Varian RPM Device and Calypso System. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956711.
Ravindran, P, Wui Ann, W, and Lim, Y. Wed . "SU-F-T-526: A Comparative Study On Gating Efficiency of Varian RPM Device and Calypso System". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956711.
@article{osti_22617034,
title = {SU-F-T-526: A Comparative Study On Gating Efficiency of Varian RPM Device and Calypso System},
author = {Ravindran, P and Wui Ann, W and Lim, Y},
abstractNote = {Purpose: In general, the linear accelerator is gated using respiratory signal obtained by way of external sensors to account for the breathing motion during radiotherapy. One of the commonly used gating devices is the Varian RPM device. Calypso system that uses electromagnetic tracking of implanted or surface transponders could also be used for gating. The aim of this study is to compare the gating efficiency of RPM device and the calypso system by phantom studies. Methods: An ArcCheck insert was used as the phantom with a Gafchromic film placed in its holder. The ArcCheck insert was placed on a Motion Sim platform and moved in the longitudinal direction simulating a respiratory motion with a period of 5 seconds and amplitude of ±6mm. The Gafchromic film was exposed to a 2 × 2cm{sup 2} field, i) with the phantom static, ii) phantom moving but ungated iii) gated with gating window of 2mm and 3mm. This was repeated with Calypso system using surface transponders with the same gating window. The Gafchromic films were read with an EPSON 11000 flatbed scanner and analysed with ‘Medphysto’ software. Results: The full width at half maximum (FWHM) as measured with film at the level of the film holder was 1.65cm when the phantom was static. FWHM measured with phantom moving and without gating was 1.16 cm and penumbra was 7 mm (80–20%) on both sides. When the beam was gated with 2 mm gating window the FWHM was 1.8 cm with RPM device and 1.9 cm with Calypso. Similarly, when the beam was gated with 3 mm window, the FWHM was 1.9cm with RPM device and 2cm with Calypso. Conclusion: This work suggests that the gating efficiency of RPM device is better than that of the Calypso with surface transponder, with reference to the latency in gating.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956711},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: In a previous study we have demonstrated the feasibility of using EPID to QA electron beam parameters on a single Varian TrueBeam LINAC. This study aims to provide further investigation on (1) reproducibility of using EPID to detect electron beam energy changes on multiple machines and (2) evaluation of appropriate calibration methods to compare results from different EPIDs. Methods: Ad-hoc mode electron beam images were acquired in developer mode with XML code. Electron beam data were collected on a total of six machines from four institutions. A custom-designed double-wedge phantom was placed on the EPID detector. Two calibration methodsmore » - Pixel Sensitivity Map (PSM) and Large Source-to-Imager Distance Flood Field (LSID-FF) - were used. To test the sensitivity of EPID in detecting energy drifts, Bending Magnet Current (BMC) was detuned to invoke energy changes corresponding to ∼±1.5 mm change in R50% of PDD on two machines from two institutions. Percent depth ionization (PDI) curves were then analyzed and compared with the respective baseline images using LSID-FF calibration. For reproducibility testing, open field EPID images and images with a standard testing phantom were collected on multiple machines. Images with and without PSM correction for same energies on different machines were overlaid and compared. Results: Two pixel shifts were observed in PDI curve when energy changes exceeded the TG142 tolerance. PSM showed the potential to correct the differences in pixel response of different imagers. With PSM correction, the histogram of images differences obtained from different machines showed narrower distributions than those images without PSM correction. Conclusion: EPID is sensitive for electron energy changes and the results are reproducible on different machines. When overlaying images from different machines, PSM showed the ability to partially eliminate the intrinsic variation of various imagers. Research Funding from Varian Medical Systems Inc.Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.« less
  • Purpose: To demonstrate the commissioning of constant dose rate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the Raystation treatment planning system for a Varian Clinac iX with Exact couch. Methods: Constant dose rate (CDR) VMAT is an option in the Raystation treatment planning system, enabling VMAT delivery on Varian linacs without a RapidArc upgrade. Raystation 4.7 was used to commission CDR-VMAT for a Varian Clinac iX. Raystation arc model parameters were selected to match machine deliverability characteristics. A Varian Exact couch model was added to Raystation 4.7 and commissioned for use in VMAT optimization. CDR-VMAT commissioning checks were performed on themore » linac, including patient-specific QA measurements for 10 test patients using both the ArcCHECK from Sun Nuclear Corporation and COMPASS from IBA Dosimetry. Multi-criteria optimization (MCO) in Raystation was used for CDR-VMAT planning. Results: Raystation 4.7 generated clinically acceptable and deliverable CDR-VMAT plans for the Varian Clinac. VMAT plans were optimized including a model of the Exact couch with both rails in the out positions. CDR-VMAT plans generated with MCO in Raystation were dosimetrically comparable to Raystation MCO-generated IMRT plans. Patient-specific QA measurements with the ArcCHECK on the couch showed good agreement with the treatment planning system prediction. Patient-specific, structure-specific, multi-statistical parameter 3D QA measurements with gantry-mounted COMPASS also showed good agreement. Conclusion: Constant dose rate VMAT was successfully modeled in Raystation 4.7 for a Varian Clinac iX, and Raystation’s multicriteria optimization generated constant dose rate VMAT plans which were deliverable and dosimetrically comparable to IMRT plans.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate an Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) as part of machine commission process with feature study. Methods: The EDW system in this study was from a Truebeam, which is the Linear accelerator manufactured by Varian Medical Systems. The EDW feature vectors includes selected elements. These elements were dosimetric output spots check, field size, wedge angles, dose rate, collimator orientation, and different energy settings. Point dose measurement was done by a PTW farmer chamber, and profiles were measured by Gafchromic EBT2 films positing at different depths of the Solidwater based on the study elements. The output spot measurements were donemore » with PTW farmer chamber with Solidwater setting for all orientation and wedge angles in the EDW system. The profiles comparisons were done by IMRT measurement function in RIT software at version 6.3. And the films were scanned by Vidar scanner. Dosimetry calculation were done by using the same Solidwater scanned by GE LightSpeed CT in Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS). Then measurements were compared to simulation results in TPS. Results: The energy average percentage difference between chamber measurement and TPS was 0.16% with standard deviation (SD) at 0.93%. For selected features, the average percentage difference between film measurement and computation was 0.93% with SD at 1.55% in horizontal profiles, and 1.18% with SD at 0.98% at vertical profiles. The average gamma difference for film measurement and TPS computing results was at 0.924 with SD at 0.314. Conclusion: A feature vector was developed to describe the commission of EDW, and developing a complete set of features for sufficiency of commission of a LINAC function could provide optimal commission instance with acceptable confident level of clinical application of the machine. Given the institution specific vector pattern and big data process, it could provide wide range clinical outcome comparison information in application of EDW.« less
  • Purpose: To introduce a non-standard method of patient setup, using BellyBoard immobilization, to better utilize the localization and tracking potential of an RF-beacon system with EBRT for prostate cancer. Methods: An RF-beacon phantom was imaged using a wide bore CT scanner, both in a standard level position and with a known rotation (4° pitch and 7.5° yaw). A commercial treatment planning system (TPS) was used to determine positional coordinates of each beacon, and the centroid of the three beacons for both setups. For each setup at the Linac, kV AP and Rt Lateral images were obtained. A full characterization ofmore » the RF-beacon system in clinical mode was completed for various beacons’ array-to-centroid distances, which includes vertical, lateral, and longitudinal offset data, as well as pitch and yaw offset measurements for the tilted phantom. For the single patient who has been setup using the proposed BellyBoard method, a supine simulation was first obtained. When abdominal protrusion was found to be exceeding the limits of the RF-Beacon system through distance-based analysis in the TPS, the patient is re-simulated prone with the BellyBoard. Array to centroid distance is measured again in the TPS, and if found to be within the localization or tracking region it is applied. Results: Characterization of limitations for the RF-beacon system in clinical mode showed acceptable consistency of offset determination for phantom setup accuracy. The nonstandard patient setup method reduced the beacons’ centroid-to-array distance by 8.32cm, from 25.13cm to 16.81cm; completely out of tracking range (greater than 20cm) to within setup tracking range (less than 20cm). Conclusion: Using the RF-beacon system in combination with this novel patient setup can allow patients who would otherwise not be candidates for beacon enhanced EBRT to now be able to benefit from the reduced PTV margins of this treatment method.« less
  • Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system wasmore » used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use.« less