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Title: Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal–insulator transition in VO{sub 2} nanowires

Abstract

We report anomalous resistance leaps and drops in VO{sub 2} nanowires with operating current density and direction, showing reversible and nonvolatile switching. This event is associated with the metal–insulator phase transition (MIT) of local nanodomains with coexistence states of metallic and insulating phases induced by thermoelectric cooling and heating effects. Because the interface of metal and insulator domains has much different Peltier coefficient, it is possible that a significant Peltier effect would be a source of the local MIT. This operation can be realized by one-dimensional domain configuration in VO{sub 2} nanowires because one straight current path through the electronic domain-interface enables theoretical control of thermoelectric effects. This result will open a new method of reversible control of electronic states in correlated electron materials.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22611538
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Advances; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; COOLING; CURRENT DENSITY; ELECTRON CORRELATION; HEATING; INTERFACES; METALS; NANOWIRES; ONE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; VANADIUM OXIDES

Citation Formats

Takami, Hidefumi, Kanki, Teruo, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, and Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp. Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal–insulator transition in VO{sub 2} nanowires. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4954734.
Takami, Hidefumi, Kanki, Teruo, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, & Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp. Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal–insulator transition in VO{sub 2} nanowires. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954734.
Takami, Hidefumi, Kanki, Teruo, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, and Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp. 2016. "Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal–insulator transition in VO{sub 2} nanowires". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954734.
@article{osti_22611538,
title = {Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal–insulator transition in VO{sub 2} nanowires},
author = {Takami, Hidefumi and Kanki, Teruo, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp and Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp},
abstractNote = {We report anomalous resistance leaps and drops in VO{sub 2} nanowires with operating current density and direction, showing reversible and nonvolatile switching. This event is associated with the metal–insulator phase transition (MIT) of local nanodomains with coexistence states of metallic and insulating phases induced by thermoelectric cooling and heating effects. Because the interface of metal and insulator domains has much different Peltier coefficient, it is possible that a significant Peltier effect would be a source of the local MIT. This operation can be realized by one-dimensional domain configuration in VO{sub 2} nanowires because one straight current path through the electronic domain-interface enables theoretical control of thermoelectric effects. This result will open a new method of reversible control of electronic states in correlated electron materials.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4954734},
journal = {AIP Advances},
number = 6,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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  • No abstract prepared.