skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Ferroelectric domain inversion and its stability in lithium niobate thin film on insulator with different thicknesses

Abstract

Ferroelectric domain inversion and its effect on the stability of lithium niobate thin films on insulator (LNOI) are experimentally characterized. Two sets of specimens with different thicknesses varying from submicron to microns are selected. For micron thick samples (∼28 μm), domain structures are achieved by pulsed electric field poling with electrodes patterned via photolithography. No domain structure deterioration has been observed for a month as inspected using polarizing optical microscopy and etching. As for submicron (540 nm) films, large-area domain inversion is realized by scanning a biased conductive tip in a piezoelectric force microscope. A graphic processing method is taken to evaluate the domain retention. A domain life time of 25.0 h is obtained and possible mechanisms are discussed. Our study gives a direct reference for domain structure-related applications of LNOI, including guiding wave nonlinear frequency conversion, nonlinear wavefront tailoring, electro-optic modulation, and piezoelectric devices.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)
  2. Jinan Jingzheng Electronics Co., Ltd., Jinan 250100 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22611456
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Advances; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; DOMAIN STRUCTURE; ELECTRIC FIELDS; FERROELECTRIC MATERIALS; LITHIUM COMPOUNDS; MICROSCOPES; MODULATION; NIOBATES; OPTICAL MICROSCOPY; PIEZOELECTRICITY; RETENTION; STABILITY; THICKNESS; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Shao, Guang-hao, Bai, Yu-hang, Cui, Guo-xin, Li, Chen, Qiu, Xiang-biao, Wu, Di, Lu, Yan-qing, E-mail: yqlu@nju.edu.cn, and Geng, De-qiang. Ferroelectric domain inversion and its stability in lithium niobate thin film on insulator with different thicknesses. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4959197.
Shao, Guang-hao, Bai, Yu-hang, Cui, Guo-xin, Li, Chen, Qiu, Xiang-biao, Wu, Di, Lu, Yan-qing, E-mail: yqlu@nju.edu.cn, & Geng, De-qiang. Ferroelectric domain inversion and its stability in lithium niobate thin film on insulator with different thicknesses. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959197.
Shao, Guang-hao, Bai, Yu-hang, Cui, Guo-xin, Li, Chen, Qiu, Xiang-biao, Wu, Di, Lu, Yan-qing, E-mail: yqlu@nju.edu.cn, and Geng, De-qiang. Fri . "Ferroelectric domain inversion and its stability in lithium niobate thin film on insulator with different thicknesses". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959197.
@article{osti_22611456,
title = {Ferroelectric domain inversion and its stability in lithium niobate thin film on insulator with different thicknesses},
author = {Shao, Guang-hao and Bai, Yu-hang and Cui, Guo-xin and Li, Chen and Qiu, Xiang-biao and Wu, Di and Lu, Yan-qing, E-mail: yqlu@nju.edu.cn and Geng, De-qiang},
abstractNote = {Ferroelectric domain inversion and its effect on the stability of lithium niobate thin films on insulator (LNOI) are experimentally characterized. Two sets of specimens with different thicknesses varying from submicron to microns are selected. For micron thick samples (∼28 μm), domain structures are achieved by pulsed electric field poling with electrodes patterned via photolithography. No domain structure deterioration has been observed for a month as inspected using polarizing optical microscopy and etching. As for submicron (540 nm) films, large-area domain inversion is realized by scanning a biased conductive tip in a piezoelectric force microscope. A graphic processing method is taken to evaluate the domain retention. A domain life time of 25.0 h is obtained and possible mechanisms are discussed. Our study gives a direct reference for domain structure-related applications of LNOI, including guiding wave nonlinear frequency conversion, nonlinear wavefront tailoring, electro-optic modulation, and piezoelectric devices.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4959197},
journal = {AIP Advances},
number = 7,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • The impact of UV laser irradiation on the distribution of lithium ions in ferroelectric lithium niobate single crystals has been numerically modelled. Strongly absorbed UV radiation at wavelengths of 244–305 nm produces steep temperature gradients which cause lithium ions to migrate and result in a local variation of the lithium concentration. In addition to the diffusion, here the pyroelectric effect is also taken into account which predicts a complex distribution of lithium concentration along the c-axis of the crystal: two separated lithium deficient regions on the surface and in depth. The modelling on the local lithium concentration and the subsequentmore » variation of the coercive field are used to explain experimental results on the domain inversion of such UV treated lithium niobate crystals.« less
  • We report the fabrication of periodically poled domain patterns in x-cut lithium niobate thin-film. Here, thin films on insulator have drawn particular attention due to their intrinsic waveguiding properties offering high mode confinement and smaller devices compared to in-diffused waveguides in bulk material. In contrast to z-cut thin film lithium niobate, the x-cut geometry does not require back electrodes for poling. Further, the x-cut geometry grants direct access to the largest nonlinear and electro-optical tensor element, which overall promises smaller devices. The domain inversion was realized via electric field poling utilizing deposited aluminum top electrodes on a stack of LNmore » thin film/SiO{sub 2} layer/Bulk LN, which were patterned by optical lithography. The periodic domain inversion was verified by non-invasive confocal second harmonic microscopy. Our results show domain patterns in accordance to the electrode mask layout. The second harmonic signatures can be interpreted in terms of spatially, overlapping domain filaments which start their growth on the +z side.« less
  • Congruent lithium niobate is characterized by its internal field, which arises due to defect clusters within the crystal. Here, it is shown experimentally that this internal field is a function of the molecular configuration in a particular domain and also on the stability of that particular configuration. The measurements of internal field are done using interferometric technique, while the variation of domain configuration is brought about by room temperature high voltage electric field poling.
  • The influence of ultraviolet (UV) light (wavelengths {lambda}=334 and 305 nm) on the ferroelectric domain inversion of lithium niobate crystals doped with different amounts of magnesium ranging from 0 to 7.5 mol % is investigated. Illumination at {lambda}=334 nm leads to a coercive field reduction of up to 50%, but only in samples doped with a magnesium concentration above the so-called optical damage threshold. For {lambda}=305 nm the effective coercive field is reduced significantly in all samples. Different behavior of the coercive field reduction at both wavelengths indicates the presence of two mechanisms. To explain the effect occurring for 305more » nm illumination a model is presented in which an UV-induced photoconductivity alters the electric-field distribution through the crystal thickness. Utilizing an UV-interference pattern and a suitable homogeneous external electrical field, periodically poled lithium niobate with a period length of 55 {mu}m is produced.« less
  • The observation of Barkhausen current spikes during the recording of volume phase holograms in potassium lithium tantalate niobate is reported on. These spikes are due to the ferroelectric domain reversal induced by photorefractive space charge fields. Both {open_quotes}small{close_quotes} (1 nA) and {open_quotes}large{close_quotes} (100 nA) spikes are observed, which correspond to micro and macro domain reversal, respectively. The diffraction efficiency can change as much as 50{percent} during a single macrodomain switching. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}