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Title: Electric current distribution of a multiwall carbon nanotube

Abstract

The electric current distribution in a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was studied by in situ measuring the electric potential along an individual MWCNT in the ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscope (TEM). The current induced voltage drop along each section of a side-bonded MWCNT was measured by a potentiometric probe in TEM. We have quantitatively derived that the current on the outermost shell depends on the applied current and the shell diameter. More proportion of the total electronic carriers hop into the inner shells when the applied current is increased. The larger a MWCNT’s diameter is, the easier the electronic carriers can hop into the inner shells. We observed that, for an 8 nm MWCNT with 10 μA current applied, 99% of the total current was distributed on the outer two shells.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)
  2. (China)
  3. Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22611450
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Advances; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; CARBON NANOTUBES; CARRIERS; DISTRIBUTION; ELECTRIC CURRENTS; ELECTRONS; POTENTIOMETRY; TRANSMISSION; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; VOLTAGE DROP

Citation Formats

Chen, Li-Ying, Chang, Chia-Seng, E-mail: jasonc@phys.sinica.edu.tw, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica and National Taiwan University, Taiwan, and Chen, Yu-Jyun. Electric current distribution of a multiwall carbon nanotube. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4959907.
Chen, Li-Ying, Chang, Chia-Seng, E-mail: jasonc@phys.sinica.edu.tw, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica and National Taiwan University, Taiwan, & Chen, Yu-Jyun. Electric current distribution of a multiwall carbon nanotube. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959907.
Chen, Li-Ying, Chang, Chia-Seng, E-mail: jasonc@phys.sinica.edu.tw, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica and National Taiwan University, Taiwan, and Chen, Yu-Jyun. 2016. "Electric current distribution of a multiwall carbon nanotube". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959907.
@article{osti_22611450,
title = {Electric current distribution of a multiwall carbon nanotube},
author = {Chen, Li-Ying and Chang, Chia-Seng, E-mail: jasonc@phys.sinica.edu.tw and Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan and Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica and National Taiwan University, Taiwan and Chen, Yu-Jyun},
abstractNote = {The electric current distribution in a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was studied by in situ measuring the electric potential along an individual MWCNT in the ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscope (TEM). The current induced voltage drop along each section of a side-bonded MWCNT was measured by a potentiometric probe in TEM. We have quantitatively derived that the current on the outermost shell depends on the applied current and the shell diameter. More proportion of the total electronic carriers hop into the inner shells when the applied current is increased. The larger a MWCNT’s diameter is, the easier the electronic carriers can hop into the inner shells. We observed that, for an 8 nm MWCNT with 10 μA current applied, 99% of the total current was distributed on the outer two shells.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4959907},
journal = {AIP Advances},
number = 7,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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