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Title: Plasmon-enhanced electron scattering in nanostructured thin metal films revealed by low-voltage scanning electron microscopy

Abstract

The drastic enhancement of backscattered electrons (BSE) yield from nanostructured thin metal film which exceeded well the one from massive metal was observed at accelerating voltages below 400 V. The dependences of BSE signal from nanostructured gold film on accelerating voltage and on retarding grid potential applied to BSE detector were investigated. It was shown that enhanced BSE signal was formed by inelastic scattered electrons coming from the gaps between nanoparticles. A tentative explanation of the mechanism of BSE signal enhancement was suggested.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [1]
  1. V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)
  2. (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22609115
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1748; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: STRANN 2016: 5. international conference on state-of-the-art trends of scientific research of artificial and natural nanoobjects, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation), 26-29 Apr 2016; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; BACKSCATTERING; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRONS; FILMS; GOLD; NANOPARTICLES; NANOSTRUCTURES; PLASMONS; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SCATTERING

Citation Formats

Mikhailovskii, V., E-mail: v.mikhailovskii@spbu.ru, IRC for Nanotechnology, Research Park, St.-Petersburg State University, Petrov, Yu., and Vyvenko, O. Plasmon-enhanced electron scattering in nanostructured thin metal films revealed by low-voltage scanning electron microscopy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4954339.
Mikhailovskii, V., E-mail: v.mikhailovskii@spbu.ru, IRC for Nanotechnology, Research Park, St.-Petersburg State University, Petrov, Yu., & Vyvenko, O. Plasmon-enhanced electron scattering in nanostructured thin metal films revealed by low-voltage scanning electron microscopy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954339.
Mikhailovskii, V., E-mail: v.mikhailovskii@spbu.ru, IRC for Nanotechnology, Research Park, St.-Petersburg State University, Petrov, Yu., and Vyvenko, O. 2016. "Plasmon-enhanced electron scattering in nanostructured thin metal films revealed by low-voltage scanning electron microscopy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954339.
@article{osti_22609115,
title = {Plasmon-enhanced electron scattering in nanostructured thin metal films revealed by low-voltage scanning electron microscopy},
author = {Mikhailovskii, V., E-mail: v.mikhailovskii@spbu.ru and IRC for Nanotechnology, Research Park, St.-Petersburg State University and Petrov, Yu. and Vyvenko, O.},
abstractNote = {The drastic enhancement of backscattered electrons (BSE) yield from nanostructured thin metal film which exceeded well the one from massive metal was observed at accelerating voltages below 400 V. The dependences of BSE signal from nanostructured gold film on accelerating voltage and on retarding grid potential applied to BSE detector were investigated. It was shown that enhanced BSE signal was formed by inelastic scattered electrons coming from the gaps between nanoparticles. A tentative explanation of the mechanism of BSE signal enhancement was suggested.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4954339},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1748,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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