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Title: Examination of biogenic selenium-containing nanosystems based on polyelectrolyte complexes by atomic force, Kelvin probe force and electron microscopy methods

Abstract

The morphology and electrical properties of biogenic selenium-containing nanosystems based on polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) were examined using AFM, Kelvin Probe Force and electron microscopy methods. It has been found, that prepared nanostructures significantly differed in their morphological types and parameters. In particular, multilayers capsules can be produced via varying synthesis conditions, especially, the selenium–PEC mass ratio ν. At the “special point” (ν = 0.1), filled and hollow nano- and microcapsules are formed in the system. The multilayer character of the capsules walls is visible in the phase images. Kelvin Probe Force images showed the inhomogeneity of potential distribution in capsules and outside them.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Institute of Macromolecular Compounds RAS, 199004 Bolshoy Pr., 31, St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation)
  2. Kotel’nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Fryazino Branch) Russian Academy of Sciences, Fryazino, Moscow region, 141190 (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22609113
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1748; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: STRANN 2016: 5. international conference on state-of-the-art trends of scientific research of artificial and natural nanoobjects, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation), 26-29 Apr 2016; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; DISTRIBUTION; ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; ELECTRONS; IMAGES; LAYERS; MASS; NANOSTRUCTURES; SELENIUM; SYNTHESIS

Citation Formats

Sukhanova, T. E., E-mail: tat-sukhanova@mail.ru, Vylegzhanina, M. E., Valueva, S. V., Volkov, A. Ya., Kutin, A. A., Temiryazeva, M. P., and Temiryazev, A. G. Examination of biogenic selenium-containing nanosystems based on polyelectrolyte complexes by atomic force, Kelvin probe force and electron microscopy methods. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4954337.
Sukhanova, T. E., E-mail: tat-sukhanova@mail.ru, Vylegzhanina, M. E., Valueva, S. V., Volkov, A. Ya., Kutin, A. A., Temiryazeva, M. P., & Temiryazev, A. G. Examination of biogenic selenium-containing nanosystems based on polyelectrolyte complexes by atomic force, Kelvin probe force and electron microscopy methods. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954337.
Sukhanova, T. E., E-mail: tat-sukhanova@mail.ru, Vylegzhanina, M. E., Valueva, S. V., Volkov, A. Ya., Kutin, A. A., Temiryazeva, M. P., and Temiryazev, A. G. 2016. "Examination of biogenic selenium-containing nanosystems based on polyelectrolyte complexes by atomic force, Kelvin probe force and electron microscopy methods". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954337.
@article{osti_22609113,
title = {Examination of biogenic selenium-containing nanosystems based on polyelectrolyte complexes by atomic force, Kelvin probe force and electron microscopy methods},
author = {Sukhanova, T. E., E-mail: tat-sukhanova@mail.ru and Vylegzhanina, M. E. and Valueva, S. V. and Volkov, A. Ya. and Kutin, A. A. and Temiryazeva, M. P. and Temiryazev, A. G.},
abstractNote = {The morphology and electrical properties of biogenic selenium-containing nanosystems based on polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) were examined using AFM, Kelvin Probe Force and electron microscopy methods. It has been found, that prepared nanostructures significantly differed in their morphological types and parameters. In particular, multilayers capsules can be produced via varying synthesis conditions, especially, the selenium–PEC mass ratio ν. At the “special point” (ν = 0.1), filled and hollow nano- and microcapsules are formed in the system. The multilayer character of the capsules walls is visible in the phase images. Kelvin Probe Force images showed the inhomogeneity of potential distribution in capsules and outside them.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4954337},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1748,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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