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Title: Dynamic regimes of local homogeneous population model with time lag

Abstract

We investigated Moran - Ricker model with time lag 1. It is made analytical and numerical study of the model. It is shown there is co-existence of various dynamic regimes under the same values of parameters. The model simultaneously possesses several different limit regimes: stable state, periodic fluctuations, and chaotic attractor. The research results show if present population size substantially depends on population number of previous year then it is observed quasi-periodic oscillations. Fluctuations with period 2 occur when the growth of population size is regulated by density dependence in the current year.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Institute for complex analysis of regional problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Far Eastern branch (ICARP FEB RAS), Birobidzhan (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608995
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1738; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: ICNAAM 2015: International conference of numerical analysis and applied mathematics 2015, Rhodes (Greece), 22-28 Sep 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ATTRACTORS; CHAOS THEORY; CURRENTS; DENSITY; FLUCTUATIONS; NUMERICAL ANALYSIS; OSCILLATIONS; PERIODICITY; POPULATIONS

Citation Formats

Neverova, Galina, and Frisman, Efim. Dynamic regimes of local homogeneous population model with time lag. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952178.
Neverova, Galina, & Frisman, Efim. Dynamic regimes of local homogeneous population model with time lag. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952178.
Neverova, Galina, and Frisman, Efim. 2016. "Dynamic regimes of local homogeneous population model with time lag". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952178.
@article{osti_22608995,
title = {Dynamic regimes of local homogeneous population model with time lag},
author = {Neverova, Galina and Frisman, Efim},
abstractNote = {We investigated Moran - Ricker model with time lag 1. It is made analytical and numerical study of the model. It is shown there is co-existence of various dynamic regimes under the same values of parameters. The model simultaneously possesses several different limit regimes: stable state, periodic fluctuations, and chaotic attractor. The research results show if present population size substantially depends on population number of previous year then it is observed quasi-periodic oscillations. Fluctuations with period 2 occur when the growth of population size is regulated by density dependence in the current year.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952178},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1738,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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