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Title: Energy properties of solid fossil fuels and solid biofuels

Abstract

The paper deals about the problematic of energy properties of solid biofuels in comparison with solid fossil fuels. Biofuels are alternative to fossil fuels and their properties are very similar. During the experiments were done in detail experiments to obtain various properties of spruce wood pellets and wheat straw pellets like biofuels in comparison with brown coal and black coal like fossil fuels. There were tested moisture content, volatile content, fixed carbon content, ash content, elementary analysis (C, H, N, S content) and ash fusion temperatures. The results show that biofuels have some advantages and also disadvantages in comparison with solid fossil fuels.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. University of Žilina, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Power Engineering, Univerzitná 8215/1, 010 26 Žilina (Slovakia)
  2. Research centre, University of Žilina, Univerzitna 8215/1, 010 26 Žilina (Slovakia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608627
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1745; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 20. International scientific conference on the application of experimental and numerical methods in fluid mechanics and energy 2016, Terchova (Slovakia), 27-29 Apr 2016; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; ASH CONTENT; ASHES; BLACK COAL; BROWN COAL; CARBON; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; FOSSILS; MOISTURE; PELLETS; SOLIDS; SPRUCES; STRAW; VOLATILITY; WHEAT; WOOD; WOOD FUELS

Citation Formats

Holubcik, Michal, E-mail: michal.holubcik@fstroj.uniza.sk, Jandacka, Jozef, E-mail: jozef.jandacka@fstroj.uniza.sk, and Kolkova, Zuzana, E-mail: zuzana.kolkova@rc.uniza.sk. Energy properties of solid fossil fuels and solid biofuels. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4953705.
Holubcik, Michal, E-mail: michal.holubcik@fstroj.uniza.sk, Jandacka, Jozef, E-mail: jozef.jandacka@fstroj.uniza.sk, & Kolkova, Zuzana, E-mail: zuzana.kolkova@rc.uniza.sk. Energy properties of solid fossil fuels and solid biofuels. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953705.
Holubcik, Michal, E-mail: michal.holubcik@fstroj.uniza.sk, Jandacka, Jozef, E-mail: jozef.jandacka@fstroj.uniza.sk, and Kolkova, Zuzana, E-mail: zuzana.kolkova@rc.uniza.sk. 2016. "Energy properties of solid fossil fuels and solid biofuels". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953705.
@article{osti_22608627,
title = {Energy properties of solid fossil fuels and solid biofuels},
author = {Holubcik, Michal, E-mail: michal.holubcik@fstroj.uniza.sk and Jandacka, Jozef, E-mail: jozef.jandacka@fstroj.uniza.sk and Kolkova, Zuzana, E-mail: zuzana.kolkova@rc.uniza.sk},
abstractNote = {The paper deals about the problematic of energy properties of solid biofuels in comparison with solid fossil fuels. Biofuels are alternative to fossil fuels and their properties are very similar. During the experiments were done in detail experiments to obtain various properties of spruce wood pellets and wheat straw pellets like biofuels in comparison with brown coal and black coal like fossil fuels. There were tested moisture content, volatile content, fixed carbon content, ash content, elementary analysis (C, H, N, S content) and ash fusion temperatures. The results show that biofuels have some advantages and also disadvantages in comparison with solid fossil fuels.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4953705},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1745,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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