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Title: Utilization of bio-degradable fermented tapioca to synthesized low toxicity of carbon nanotubes for drug delivery applications

Abstract

Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have potential biomedical applications, and investigations are shifting towards the production of such nanotubes using renewable natural sources. CNTs were synthesized at various temperatures of 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900 °C, respectively, using a local fermented food known as “tapai ubi” or fermented tapioca as a precursor. The liquid part of this fermented food was heated separately at 80°C and channeled directly into the furnace system that employs the thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Ferrocene, which was the catalyst was placed in furnace 1 in the thermal CVD process. The resulting CNTs produced from the process were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The FESEM images showed the growth morphology of the CNTs at the different temperatures employed. It was observed that the higher the synthesis temperature up to a point, the diameter of CNTs produced, after which the diameter increased. CNTs with helical structures were observed at 700 °C with a diameter range of 111 - 143 nm. A more straightened structure was observed at 750 °C with a diameter range of 59 - 121 nm. From 800 °C onwards, the diameters of the CNTs were less than 60more » nm. Raman analysis revealed the present of D, G and G’ peak were observed at 1227-1358, 1565-1582, and 2678-2695 cm{sup −1}, respectively. The highest degree of crystallity of the carbon nanotubes synthesized were obtained at 800 °C. The radial breathing mode (RBM) were in range between 212-220 and 279-292 cm{sup −1}. Carbon nanotubes also being functionalized with Polyethylene bis(amine) Mw2000 (PEG 2000-NH2) and showed highly cells viability compared to non-functionalized CNT. The nanotubes synthesized will be applied as drug delivery in future study.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ;
  1. NANO-SciTech Centre, Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)
  2. Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)
  3. Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)
  4. NANO-Electronic Centre, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608608
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1733; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: IC-NET 2015: International conference on nano-electronic technology devices and materials 2015, Selangor (Malaysia), 27 Feb - 2 Mar 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; CARBON NANOTUBES; CATALYSTS; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; FERROCENE; FIELD EMISSION; LIQUIDS; POLYETHYLENES; PRECURSOR; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; RESPIRATION; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SYNTHESIS; TOXICITY; VIABILITY

Citation Formats

Nurulhuda, I., E-mail: nurulnye@gmail.com, Poh, R., Mazatulikhma, M. Z., Rusop, M., E-mail: nanouitm@gmail.com, Salman, A. H. A., and Haseeb, A. K.. Utilization of bio-degradable fermented tapioca to synthesized low toxicity of carbon nanotubes for drug delivery applications. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4948876.
Nurulhuda, I., E-mail: nurulnye@gmail.com, Poh, R., Mazatulikhma, M. Z., Rusop, M., E-mail: nanouitm@gmail.com, Salman, A. H. A., & Haseeb, A. K.. Utilization of bio-degradable fermented tapioca to synthesized low toxicity of carbon nanotubes for drug delivery applications. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4948876.
Nurulhuda, I., E-mail: nurulnye@gmail.com, Poh, R., Mazatulikhma, M. Z., Rusop, M., E-mail: nanouitm@gmail.com, Salman, A. H. A., and Haseeb, A. K.. Wed . "Utilization of bio-degradable fermented tapioca to synthesized low toxicity of carbon nanotubes for drug delivery applications". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4948876.
@article{osti_22608608,
title = {Utilization of bio-degradable fermented tapioca to synthesized low toxicity of carbon nanotubes for drug delivery applications},
author = {Nurulhuda, I., E-mail: nurulnye@gmail.com and Poh, R. and Mazatulikhma, M. Z. and Rusop, M., E-mail: nanouitm@gmail.com and Salman, A. H. A. and Haseeb, A. K.},
abstractNote = {Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have potential biomedical applications, and investigations are shifting towards the production of such nanotubes using renewable natural sources. CNTs were synthesized at various temperatures of 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900 °C, respectively, using a local fermented food known as “tapai ubi” or fermented tapioca as a precursor. The liquid part of this fermented food was heated separately at 80°C and channeled directly into the furnace system that employs the thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Ferrocene, which was the catalyst was placed in furnace 1 in the thermal CVD process. The resulting CNTs produced from the process were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The FESEM images showed the growth morphology of the CNTs at the different temperatures employed. It was observed that the higher the synthesis temperature up to a point, the diameter of CNTs produced, after which the diameter increased. CNTs with helical structures were observed at 700 °C with a diameter range of 111 - 143 nm. A more straightened structure was observed at 750 °C with a diameter range of 59 - 121 nm. From 800 °C onwards, the diameters of the CNTs were less than 60 nm. Raman analysis revealed the present of D, G and G’ peak were observed at 1227-1358, 1565-1582, and 2678-2695 cm{sup −1}, respectively. The highest degree of crystallity of the carbon nanotubes synthesized were obtained at 800 °C. The radial breathing mode (RBM) were in range between 212-220 and 279-292 cm{sup −1}. Carbon nanotubes also being functionalized with Polyethylene bis(amine) Mw2000 (PEG 2000-NH2) and showed highly cells viability compared to non-functionalized CNT. The nanotubes synthesized will be applied as drug delivery in future study.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4948876},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1733,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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