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Title: Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy

Abstract

Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic)
  2. German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)
  3. Advacam, Prague (Czech Republic)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608524
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1753; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Latin American symposium on nuclear physics and applications, Medellin (Colombia), 30 Nov - 4 Dec 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DEPOSITION; ION BEAMS; LIGHT IONS; PROTONS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; REVIEWS; VERIFICATION

Citation Formats

Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz, Opalka, Lukas, Martisikova, Maria, Gwosch, Klaus, and Jakubek, Jan. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955377.
Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz, Opalka, Lukas, Martisikova, Maria, Gwosch, Klaus, & Jakubek, Jan. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955377.
Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz, Opalka, Lukas, Martisikova, Maria, Gwosch, Klaus, and Jakubek, Jan. 2016. "Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955377.
@article{osti_22608524,
title = {Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy},
author = {Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz and Opalka, Lukas and Martisikova, Maria and Gwosch, Klaus and Jakubek, Jan},
abstractNote = {Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955377},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1753,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • Purpose: Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and other tumors undergo radiation therapy (RT) before surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials: A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activatedmore » fluorescent probes, and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a hand-held imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by Western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results: RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b-positive tumor-associated immune cells. Conclusions: In this primary murine model of STS, RT did not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes labeled tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to include patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes.« less
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