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Title: The quest for an electric dipole moment of the neutron

Abstract

To date no electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM) has been observed. Why it is so vanishing small, escaping detection in the last 50 years, is not easy to explain. In general it is considered as the most sensitive probe for the violation of the combined symmetry of charge and parity (CP). A discovery could shed light on the poorly understood matter/anti-matter asymmetry of the universe. The neutron might one day help to distinguish different sources of CP-violation in combination with measurements of the electron and diamagnetic EDMs. This proceedings article presents an overview of the most important concepts in searches for an nEDM and presents a brief overview of the world wide efforts.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608510
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1753; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Latin American symposium on nuclear physics and applications, Medellin (Colombia), 30 Nov - 4 Dec 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ASYMMETRY; CP INVARIANCE; DETECTION; ELECTRIC DIPOLE MOMENTS; ELECTRIC DIPOLES; ELECTRONS; NEUTRONS; PARITY; SYMMETRY; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Schmidt-Wellenburg, P., E-mail: philipp.schmidt-wellenburg@psi.ch. The quest for an electric dipole moment of the neutron. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955363.
Schmidt-Wellenburg, P., E-mail: philipp.schmidt-wellenburg@psi.ch. The quest for an electric dipole moment of the neutron. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955363.
Schmidt-Wellenburg, P., E-mail: philipp.schmidt-wellenburg@psi.ch. 2016. "The quest for an electric dipole moment of the neutron". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955363.
@article{osti_22608510,
title = {The quest for an electric dipole moment of the neutron},
author = {Schmidt-Wellenburg, P., E-mail: philipp.schmidt-wellenburg@psi.ch},
abstractNote = {To date no electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM) has been observed. Why it is so vanishing small, escaping detection in the last 50 years, is not easy to explain. In general it is considered as the most sensitive probe for the violation of the combined symmetry of charge and parity (CP). A discovery could shed light on the poorly understood matter/anti-matter asymmetry of the universe. The neutron might one day help to distinguish different sources of CP-violation in combination with measurements of the electron and diamagnetic EDMs. This proceedings article presents an overview of the most important concepts in searches for an nEDM and presents a brief overview of the world wide efforts.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955363},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1753,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • The search for particle electric dipole moments (EDM's) is one of the best places to look for physics beyond the standard model of electroweak interaction because the size of time reversal violation predicted by the standard model is incompatible with present ideas concerning the creation of the baryon-antibaryon asymmetry. As the sensitivity of these EDM searches increases more subtle systematic effects become important. We develop a general analytical approach to describe a systematic effect recently observed in an electric dipole moment experiment using stored particles [J. M. Pendlebury et al., Phys. Rev. A 70, 032102 (2004)]. Our approach is basedmore » on the relationship between the systematic frequency shift and the velocity autocorrelation function of the resonating particles. Our results, when applied to well-known limiting forms of the correlation function, are in good agreement with both the limiting cases studied in recent work that employed a numerical and heuristic analysis. Our general approach explains some of the surprising results observed in that work and displays the rich behavior of the shift for intermediate frequencies, which has not been studied previously.« less
  • We discuss a possibility that the neutron electric dipole moment (NEDM) can be calculated in lattice QCD simulations in the presence of the CP-violating {theta} term. In this paper we measure the energy difference between spin-up and spin-down states of the neutron in the presence of a uniform and static external electric field. We first test this method in quenched QCD with the renormalization group improved gauge action on a 16{sup 3}x32 lattice at a{sup -1}{approx_equal}2 GeV, employing two different lattice fermion formulations, the domain-wall fermion and the clover fermion for quarks, at relatively heavy quark mass (m{sub PS}/m{sub V}{approx_equal}0.85).more » We obtain nonzero values of the NEDM from calculations with both fermion formulations. We next consider some systematic uncertainties of our method for the NEDM, using 24{sup 3}x32 lattice at the same lattice spacing only with the clover fermion. We finally investigate the quark mass dependence of the NEDM and observe a nonvanishing behavior of the NEDM toward the chiral limit. We interpret this behavior as a manifestation of the pathology in the quenched approximation.« less
  • We have calculated the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) in the presence of the CP violating {theta} term in lattice QCD with two-flavor dynamical clover quarks, using the external electric field method. Accumulating a large number of statistics by the averages over 16 different source points and over forward and backward nucleon propagators, we have obtained nonzero signals of neutron and proton EDM beyond 1 standard deviation at each quark mass in full QCD. We have investigated the quark mass dependence of nucleon EDM in full QCD, and have found that nucleon EDM in full QCD does not decrease towardmore » the chiral limit, as opposed to the theoretical expectation. We briefly discuss possible reasons for this behavior.« less
  • We have considered a mechanism for inducing a time-reversal violating electric dipole moment (EDM) in atoms through the interaction of a nuclear EDM d{sub N} with the hyperfine interaction, the ''magnetic moment effect''. We have derived the operator for this interaction and presented analytical formulas for the matrix elements between atomic states. Induced EDMs in the diamagnetic atoms {sup 129}Xe, {sup 171}Yb, {sup 199}Hg, {sup 211}Rn, and {sup 225}Ra have been calculated numerically. From the experimental limits on the atomic EDMs of {sup 129}Xe and {sup 199}Hg we have placed the following constraints on the nuclear EDMs, |d{sub N}({sup 129}Xe)|<1.1x10{supmore » -21}|e|cm and |d{sub N}({sup 199}Hg)|<2.8x10{sup -24}|e|cm.« less