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Title: Open questions on nuclear collective motion

Abstract

The status of the macroscopic and microscopic description of the collective quadrupole modes is reviewed, where limits due to non-adiabaticity and decoherence are exposed. The microscopic description of the yrast states in vibrator-like nuclei in the framework of the rotating mean field is presented.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics, University Notre Dame, IN 46557 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608490
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1753; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Latin American symposium on nuclear physics and applications, Medellin (Colombia), 30 Nov - 4 Dec 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; COLLECTIVE MODEL; MEAN-FIELD THEORY; NUCLEAR PHYSICS; NUCLEI; QUANTUM DECOHERENCE; REVIEWS; YRAST STATES

Citation Formats

Frauendorf, S., E-mail: sfrauend@nd.edu. Open questions on nuclear collective motion. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955342.
Frauendorf, S., E-mail: sfrauend@nd.edu. Open questions on nuclear collective motion. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955342.
Frauendorf, S., E-mail: sfrauend@nd.edu. 2016. "Open questions on nuclear collective motion". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955342.
@article{osti_22608490,
title = {Open questions on nuclear collective motion},
author = {Frauendorf, S., E-mail: sfrauend@nd.edu},
abstractNote = {The status of the macroscopic and microscopic description of the collective quadrupole modes is reviewed, where limits due to non-adiabaticity and decoherence are exposed. The microscopic description of the yrast states in vibrator-like nuclei in the framework of the rotating mean field is presented.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955342},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1753,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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