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Title: A multi-perspective review of microbial fuel-cells for wastewater treatment: Bio-electro-chemical, microbiologic and modeling aspects

Abstract

Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) represent a still novel technology for the recovery of energy and resources through wastewater treatment. Although the technology is quite appealing, due its potential benefits, its practical application is still hampered by several drawbacks, such as systems instability (especially when attempting to scale-up reactors from laboratory prototype), internally competing microbial reactions, and limited power generation. This paper is an attempt to address several of the operational issues related to MFCs application to wastewater treatment, in particular when dealing with simultaneous organic matter and nitrogen pollution control. Reactor configuration, operational schemes, electrochemical and microbiological characterization, optimization methods and modelling strategies are reviewed and discussed with a multidisciplinary, multi-perspective approach. The conclusions drawn herein can be of practical interest for all MFC researchers dealing with domestic or industrial wastewater treatment..

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. DICAr, University of Pavia (Italy)
  2. LEQUIA, University of Girona (Spain)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608462
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1758; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: TMREES2016: Conference on technologies and materials for renewable energy, environment and sustainability, Beirut (Lebanon), 15-18 Apr 2016; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; BIOFUELS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; FUEL CELLS; FUELS; INSTABILITY; NITROGEN; OPTIMIZATION; ORGANIC MATTER; POLLUTION; POLLUTION CONTROL; POWER GENERATION; RESOURCES; REVIEWS; SIMULATION; WASTE WATER; WATER TREATMENT

Citation Formats

Capodaglio, Andrea G., E-mail: capo@unipv.it, Molognoni, Daniele, and Pons, Anna Vilajeliu. A multi-perspective review of microbial fuel-cells for wastewater treatment: Bio-electro-chemical, microbiologic and modeling aspects. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4959428.
Capodaglio, Andrea G., E-mail: capo@unipv.it, Molognoni, Daniele, & Pons, Anna Vilajeliu. A multi-perspective review of microbial fuel-cells for wastewater treatment: Bio-electro-chemical, microbiologic and modeling aspects. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959428.
Capodaglio, Andrea G., E-mail: capo@unipv.it, Molognoni, Daniele, and Pons, Anna Vilajeliu. Mon . "A multi-perspective review of microbial fuel-cells for wastewater treatment: Bio-electro-chemical, microbiologic and modeling aspects". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959428.
@article{osti_22608462,
title = {A multi-perspective review of microbial fuel-cells for wastewater treatment: Bio-electro-chemical, microbiologic and modeling aspects},
author = {Capodaglio, Andrea G., E-mail: capo@unipv.it and Molognoni, Daniele and Pons, Anna Vilajeliu},
abstractNote = {Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) represent a still novel technology for the recovery of energy and resources through wastewater treatment. Although the technology is quite appealing, due its potential benefits, its practical application is still hampered by several drawbacks, such as systems instability (especially when attempting to scale-up reactors from laboratory prototype), internally competing microbial reactions, and limited power generation. This paper is an attempt to address several of the operational issues related to MFCs application to wastewater treatment, in particular when dealing with simultaneous organic matter and nitrogen pollution control. Reactor configuration, operational schemes, electrochemical and microbiological characterization, optimization methods and modelling strategies are reviewed and discussed with a multidisciplinary, multi-perspective approach. The conclusions drawn herein can be of practical interest for all MFC researchers dealing with domestic or industrial wastewater treatment..},
doi = {10.1063/1.4959428},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1758,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 25 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Jul 25 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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