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Title: Contribution of the conferences of the parties and the renewable energy role for the fight against climate change

Abstract

The Kyoto Protocol, which entered into force on 16 February 2005, commits developed countries to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases by 5% in 2012 compared to 1990. Due to the abstention of the United States and the absence of constraint on Southern countries, the protocol establishes obligations only to countries that represent only 33% of global CO{sub 2} emissions. All the diplomatic effort is therefore to seek the commitment of discussion for the period after 2012. The participation of the United States and emerging countries is imperative. The essential point of this second negotiation process is to search in the effort to integrate the United States and the developing countries and, more particularly, emerging economies such as China, India or Brazil, whose current emissions and / or projected should exceed those of developed countries during the first half of the twenty-first century. Real progress has been made in recent years. Indeed, a first universal historic agreement and legally binding was adopted after two weeks of intense negotiations by the Parties from 30 November to 12 December 2015, which aims to limit global warming by the end of this century well below 2 ° C while continuing efforts to notmore » exceed 1.5 ° C. Moreover, the European Union, China and the United States have expressed their willingness to reduce their greenhouse gas. Because, one of the great hopes of the fight against the emission of greenhouse gases is the development of renewable energy, the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report highlights the need to move towards renewable energy sources. The European Union, China and United States also expressed their willingness to increase the share of renewable energy. It is therefore necessary to develop the only inexhaustible energy, renewable energy, to fight against climate change.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Centre de Développement des Energies Renouvelables, CDER, BP 62 Route de l’Observatoire, Bouzaréah, 16340, Algiers (Algeria)
  2. Université d’Alger, Algiers (Algeria)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608461
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1758; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: TMREES2016: Conference on technologies and materials for renewable energy, environment and sustainability, Beirut (Lebanon), 15-18 Apr 2016; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BRAZIL; CARBON DIOXIDE; CHINA; CLIMATES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; EMISSION; EUROPEAN UNION; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; GREENHOUSE GASES; GREENHOUSES; INDIA; KYOTO PROTOCOL; LEGAL ASPECTS; MEETINGS; NEGOTIATION; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; USA

Citation Formats

Ghezloun, A., E-mail: a.ghezloun@cder.dz, Oucher, N., Merabet, H., and Saidane, A. Contribution of the conferences of the parties and the renewable energy role for the fight against climate change. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4959426.
Ghezloun, A., E-mail: a.ghezloun@cder.dz, Oucher, N., Merabet, H., & Saidane, A. Contribution of the conferences of the parties and the renewable energy role for the fight against climate change. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959426.
Ghezloun, A., E-mail: a.ghezloun@cder.dz, Oucher, N., Merabet, H., and Saidane, A. 2016. "Contribution of the conferences of the parties and the renewable energy role for the fight against climate change". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959426.
@article{osti_22608461,
title = {Contribution of the conferences of the parties and the renewable energy role for the fight against climate change},
author = {Ghezloun, A., E-mail: a.ghezloun@cder.dz and Oucher, N. and Merabet, H. and Saidane, A.},
abstractNote = {The Kyoto Protocol, which entered into force on 16 February 2005, commits developed countries to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases by 5% in 2012 compared to 1990. Due to the abstention of the United States and the absence of constraint on Southern countries, the protocol establishes obligations only to countries that represent only 33% of global CO{sub 2} emissions. All the diplomatic effort is therefore to seek the commitment of discussion for the period after 2012. The participation of the United States and emerging countries is imperative. The essential point of this second negotiation process is to search in the effort to integrate the United States and the developing countries and, more particularly, emerging economies such as China, India or Brazil, whose current emissions and / or projected should exceed those of developed countries during the first half of the twenty-first century. Real progress has been made in recent years. Indeed, a first universal historic agreement and legally binding was adopted after two weeks of intense negotiations by the Parties from 30 November to 12 December 2015, which aims to limit global warming by the end of this century well below 2 ° C while continuing efforts to not exceed 1.5 ° C. Moreover, the European Union, China and the United States have expressed their willingness to reduce their greenhouse gas. Because, one of the great hopes of the fight against the emission of greenhouse gases is the development of renewable energy, the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report highlights the need to move towards renewable energy sources. The European Union, China and United States also expressed their willingness to increase the share of renewable energy. It is therefore necessary to develop the only inexhaustible energy, renewable energy, to fight against climate change.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4959426},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1758,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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