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Title: Energy dispersive detector for white beam synchrotron x-ray fluorescence imaging

Abstract

A novel, “single-shot” fluorescence imaging technique has been demonstrated on the B16 beamline at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron using the HEXITEC energy dispersive imaging detector. A custom made furnace with 200µm thick metal alloy samples was positioned in a white X-ray beam with a hole made in the furnace walls to allow the transmitted beam to be imaged with a conventional X-ray imaging camera consisting of a 500 µm thick single crystal LYSO scintillator, mirror and lens coupled to an AVT Manta G125B CCD sensor. The samples were positioned 45° to the incident beam to enable simultaneous transmission and fluorescence imaging. The HEXITEC detector was positioned at 90° to the sample with a 50 µm pinhole 13 cm from the sample and the detector positioned 2.3m from pinhole. The geometric magnification provided a field of view of 1.1×1.1mm{sup 2} with one of the 80×80 pixels imaging an area equivalent to 13µm{sup 2}. Al-Cu alloys doped with Zr, Ag and Mo were imaged in transmission and fluorescence mode. The fluorescence images showed that the dopant metals could be simultaneously imaged with sufficient counts on all 80x80 pixels within 60 s, with the X-ray flux limiting the fluorescence imaging rate. Thismore » technique demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously image and identify multiple elements on a spatial resolution scale ~10µm or higher without the time consuming need to scan monochromatic energies or raster scan a focused beam of X-rays. Moving to high flux beamlines and using an array of detectors could improve the imaging speed of the technique with element specific imaging estimated to be on a 1 s timescale.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3]; ; ;  [4]
  1. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Campus,UK (United Kingdom)
  2. Diamond Light Source, I12 Beamline, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)
  3. Diamond Light Source, B16 Beamline, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)
  4. Department of Materials, University of Oxford Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608434
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ALLOYS; ALUMINIUM; BEAM OPTICS; CHARGE-COUPLED DEVICES; COPPER; DIAMONDS; DOPED MATERIALS; FLUORESCENCE; METALS; MIRRORS; MOLYBDENUM ADDITIONS; MONOCHROMATIC RADIATION; MONOCRYSTALS; SENSORS; SILVER ADDITIONS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SYNCHROTRONS; TRANSMISSION; X RADIATION; ZIRCONIUM ADDITIONS

Citation Formats

Wilson, Matthew D., E-mail: Matt.Wilson@stfc.ac.uk, Seller, Paul, Veale, Matthew C., Connolley, Thomas, Dolbnya, Igor P., Malandain, Andrew, Sawhney, Kawal, Grant, Patrick S., Liotti, Enzo, and Lui, Andrew. Energy dispersive detector for white beam synchrotron x-ray fluorescence imaging. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952928.
Wilson, Matthew D., E-mail: Matt.Wilson@stfc.ac.uk, Seller, Paul, Veale, Matthew C., Connolley, Thomas, Dolbnya, Igor P., Malandain, Andrew, Sawhney, Kawal, Grant, Patrick S., Liotti, Enzo, & Lui, Andrew. Energy dispersive detector for white beam synchrotron x-ray fluorescence imaging. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952928.
Wilson, Matthew D., E-mail: Matt.Wilson@stfc.ac.uk, Seller, Paul, Veale, Matthew C., Connolley, Thomas, Dolbnya, Igor P., Malandain, Andrew, Sawhney, Kawal, Grant, Patrick S., Liotti, Enzo, and Lui, Andrew. 2016. "Energy dispersive detector for white beam synchrotron x-ray fluorescence imaging". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952928.
@article{osti_22608434,
title = {Energy dispersive detector for white beam synchrotron x-ray fluorescence imaging},
author = {Wilson, Matthew D., E-mail: Matt.Wilson@stfc.ac.uk and Seller, Paul and Veale, Matthew C. and Connolley, Thomas and Dolbnya, Igor P. and Malandain, Andrew and Sawhney, Kawal and Grant, Patrick S. and Liotti, Enzo and Lui, Andrew},
abstractNote = {A novel, “single-shot” fluorescence imaging technique has been demonstrated on the B16 beamline at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron using the HEXITEC energy dispersive imaging detector. A custom made furnace with 200µm thick metal alloy samples was positioned in a white X-ray beam with a hole made in the furnace walls to allow the transmitted beam to be imaged with a conventional X-ray imaging camera consisting of a 500 µm thick single crystal LYSO scintillator, mirror and lens coupled to an AVT Manta G125B CCD sensor. The samples were positioned 45° to the incident beam to enable simultaneous transmission and fluorescence imaging. The HEXITEC detector was positioned at 90° to the sample with a 50 µm pinhole 13 cm from the sample and the detector positioned 2.3m from pinhole. The geometric magnification provided a field of view of 1.1×1.1mm{sup 2} with one of the 80×80 pixels imaging an area equivalent to 13µm{sup 2}. Al-Cu alloys doped with Zr, Ag and Mo were imaged in transmission and fluorescence mode. The fluorescence images showed that the dopant metals could be simultaneously imaged with sufficient counts on all 80x80 pixels within 60 s, with the X-ray flux limiting the fluorescence imaging rate. This technique demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously image and identify multiple elements on a spatial resolution scale ~10µm or higher without the time consuming need to scan monochromatic energies or raster scan a focused beam of X-rays. Moving to high flux beamlines and using an array of detectors could improve the imaging speed of the technique with element specific imaging estimated to be on a 1 s timescale.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952928},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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