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Title: High-speed imaging at high x-ray energy: CdTe sensors coupled to charge-integrating pixel array detectors

Abstract

Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) consist of an x-ray sensor layer bonded pixel-by-pixel to an underlying readout chip. This approach allows both the sensor and the custom pixel electronics to be tailored independently to best match the x-ray imaging requirements. Here we describe the hybridization of CdTe sensors to two different charge-integrating readout chips, the Keck PAD and the Mixed-Mode PAD (MM-PAD), both developed previously in our laboratory. The charge-integrating architecture of each of these PADs extends the instantaneous counting rate by many orders of magnitude beyond that obtainable with photon counting architectures. The Keck PAD chip consists of rapid, 8-frame, in-pixel storage elements with framing periods <150 ns. The second detector, the MM-PAD, has an extended dynamic range by utilizing an in-pixel overflow counter coupled with charge removal circuitry activated at each overflow. This allows the recording of signals from the single-photon level to tens of millions of x-rays/pixel/frame while framing at 1 kHz. Both detector chips consist of a 128×128 pixel array with (150 µm){sup 2} pixels.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)
  2. Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)
  3. (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608419
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; CADMIUM TELLURIDES; COUNTING RATES; IMAGES; LAYERS; PHOTONS; READOUT SYSTEMS; SENSORS; STORAGE; X RADIATION; PHOTON COUNTING

Citation Formats

Becker, Julian, Tate, Mark W., Shanks, Katherine S., Philipp, Hugh T., Weiss, Joel T., Purohit, Prafull, Chamberlain, Darol, Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu, and Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. High-speed imaging at high x-ray energy: CdTe sensors coupled to charge-integrating pixel array detectors. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952909.
Becker, Julian, Tate, Mark W., Shanks, Katherine S., Philipp, Hugh T., Weiss, Joel T., Purohit, Prafull, Chamberlain, Darol, Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu, & Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. High-speed imaging at high x-ray energy: CdTe sensors coupled to charge-integrating pixel array detectors. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952909.
Becker, Julian, Tate, Mark W., Shanks, Katherine S., Philipp, Hugh T., Weiss, Joel T., Purohit, Prafull, Chamberlain, Darol, Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu, and Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. 2016. "High-speed imaging at high x-ray energy: CdTe sensors coupled to charge-integrating pixel array detectors". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952909.
@article{osti_22608419,
title = {High-speed imaging at high x-ray energy: CdTe sensors coupled to charge-integrating pixel array detectors},
author = {Becker, Julian and Tate, Mark W. and Shanks, Katherine S. and Philipp, Hugh T. and Weiss, Joel T. and Purohit, Prafull and Chamberlain, Darol and Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu and Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source},
abstractNote = {Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) consist of an x-ray sensor layer bonded pixel-by-pixel to an underlying readout chip. This approach allows both the sensor and the custom pixel electronics to be tailored independently to best match the x-ray imaging requirements. Here we describe the hybridization of CdTe sensors to two different charge-integrating readout chips, the Keck PAD and the Mixed-Mode PAD (MM-PAD), both developed previously in our laboratory. The charge-integrating architecture of each of these PADs extends the instantaneous counting rate by many orders of magnitude beyond that obtainable with photon counting architectures. The Keck PAD chip consists of rapid, 8-frame, in-pixel storage elements with framing periods <150 ns. The second detector, the MM-PAD, has an extended dynamic range by utilizing an in-pixel overflow counter coupled with charge removal circuitry activated at each overflow. This allows the recording of signals from the single-photon level to tens of millions of x-rays/pixel/frame while framing at 1 kHz. Both detector chips consist of a 128×128 pixel array with (150 µm){sup 2} pixels.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952909},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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