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Title: Development of contamination-free x-ray optics for next-generation light sources

Abstract

We studied typical forms of contamination on X-ray mirrors that cause degradation of beam quality, investigated techniques to remove the contaminants, and propose methods to eliminate the sources of the contamination. The total amount of carbon-containing substances on various materials in the vicinity of a mirror was measured by thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was found that cleanliness and ultra-high vacuum techniques are required to produce the contamination-free surfaces that are essential for the propagation of high-quality X-ray beams. The reduction of carbonaceous residue adsorbed on the surfaces, and absorbed into the bulk, of the materials in the vicinity of the mirrors is a key step toward achieving contamination-free X-ray optics.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. JASRI / SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 JAPAN (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608407
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; BEAM OPTICS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; DESORPTION; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY; MASS; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; MIRRORS; REDUCTION; RESIDUES; SURFACES; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Ohashi, Haruhiko, E-mail: hohashi@spring8.or.jp, Senba, Yasunori, Yumoto, Hirokatsu, Koyama, Takahisa, Miura, Takanori, and Kishimoto, Hikaru. Development of contamination-free x-ray optics for next-generation light sources. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952895.
Ohashi, Haruhiko, E-mail: hohashi@spring8.or.jp, Senba, Yasunori, Yumoto, Hirokatsu, Koyama, Takahisa, Miura, Takanori, & Kishimoto, Hikaru. Development of contamination-free x-ray optics for next-generation light sources. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952895.
Ohashi, Haruhiko, E-mail: hohashi@spring8.or.jp, Senba, Yasunori, Yumoto, Hirokatsu, Koyama, Takahisa, Miura, Takanori, and Kishimoto, Hikaru. 2016. "Development of contamination-free x-ray optics for next-generation light sources". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952895.
@article{osti_22608407,
title = {Development of contamination-free x-ray optics for next-generation light sources},
author = {Ohashi, Haruhiko, E-mail: hohashi@spring8.or.jp and Senba, Yasunori and Yumoto, Hirokatsu and Koyama, Takahisa and Miura, Takanori and Kishimoto, Hikaru},
abstractNote = {We studied typical forms of contamination on X-ray mirrors that cause degradation of beam quality, investigated techniques to remove the contaminants, and propose methods to eliminate the sources of the contamination. The total amount of carbon-containing substances on various materials in the vicinity of a mirror was measured by thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was found that cleanliness and ultra-high vacuum techniques are required to produce the contamination-free surfaces that are essential for the propagation of high-quality X-ray beams. The reduction of carbonaceous residue adsorbed on the surfaces, and absorbed into the bulk, of the materials in the vicinity of the mirrors is a key step toward achieving contamination-free X-ray optics.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952895},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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