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Title: Transmission diamond imaging detector

Abstract

Many modern synchrotron techniques are trending toward use of high flux beams and/or beams which require enhanced stability and precise understanding of beam position and intensity from the front end of the beamline all the way to the sample. For high flux beams, major challenges include heat load management in optics (including the vacuum windows) and a mechanism of real-time volumetric measurement of beam properties such as flux, position, and morphology. For beam stability in these environments, feedback from such measurements directly to control systems for optical elements or to sample positioning stages would be invaluable. To address these challenges, we are developing diamond-based instrumented vacuum windows with integrated volumetric x-ray intensity, beam profile and beam-position monitoring capabilities. A 50 µm thick single crystal diamond has been lithographically patterned to produce 60 µm pixels, creating a >1kilopixel free-standing transmission imaging detector. This device, coupled with a custom, FPGA-based readout, has been used to image both white and monochromatic x-ray beams and capture the last x-ray photons at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This technology will form the basis for the instrumented end-station window of the x-ray footprinting beamline (XFP) at NSLS-II.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)
  2. Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States)
  3. Case Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608391
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; BEAM POSITION; BEAM PROFILES; BEAMS; CAPTURE; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DIAMONDS; EQUIPMENT; FEEDBACK; IMAGES; MONOCHROMATIC RADIATION; MONOCRYSTALS; NSLS; OPTICS; PHOTONS; READOUT SYSTEMS; STABILITY; SYNCHROTRONS; TRANSMISSION; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Smedley, John, E-mail: smedley@bnl.gov, Pinelli, Don, Gaoweia, Mengjia, Muller, Erik, Ding, Wenxiang, Zhou, Tianyi, and Bohon, Jen. Transmission diamond imaging detector. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952878.
Smedley, John, E-mail: smedley@bnl.gov, Pinelli, Don, Gaoweia, Mengjia, Muller, Erik, Ding, Wenxiang, Zhou, Tianyi, & Bohon, Jen. Transmission diamond imaging detector. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952878.
Smedley, John, E-mail: smedley@bnl.gov, Pinelli, Don, Gaoweia, Mengjia, Muller, Erik, Ding, Wenxiang, Zhou, Tianyi, and Bohon, Jen. Wed . "Transmission diamond imaging detector". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952878.
@article{osti_22608391,
title = {Transmission diamond imaging detector},
author = {Smedley, John, E-mail: smedley@bnl.gov and Pinelli, Don and Gaoweia, Mengjia and Muller, Erik and Ding, Wenxiang and Zhou, Tianyi and Bohon, Jen},
abstractNote = {Many modern synchrotron techniques are trending toward use of high flux beams and/or beams which require enhanced stability and precise understanding of beam position and intensity from the front end of the beamline all the way to the sample. For high flux beams, major challenges include heat load management in optics (including the vacuum windows) and a mechanism of real-time volumetric measurement of beam properties such as flux, position, and morphology. For beam stability in these environments, feedback from such measurements directly to control systems for optical elements or to sample positioning stages would be invaluable. To address these challenges, we are developing diamond-based instrumented vacuum windows with integrated volumetric x-ray intensity, beam profile and beam-position monitoring capabilities. A 50 µm thick single crystal diamond has been lithographically patterned to produce 60 µm pixels, creating a >1kilopixel free-standing transmission imaging detector. This device, coupled with a custom, FPGA-based readout, has been used to image both white and monochromatic x-ray beams and capture the last x-ray photons at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This technology will form the basis for the instrumented end-station window of the x-ray footprinting beamline (XFP) at NSLS-II.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952878},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}