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Title: Transmission diamond imaging detector

Abstract

Many modern synchrotron techniques are trending toward use of high flux beams and/or beams which require enhanced stability and precise understanding of beam position and intensity from the front end of the beamline all the way to the sample. For high flux beams, major challenges include heat load management in optics (including the vacuum windows) and a mechanism of real-time volumetric measurement of beam properties such as flux, position, and morphology. For beam stability in these environments, feedback from such measurements directly to control systems for optical elements or to sample positioning stages would be invaluable. To address these challenges, we are developing diamond-based instrumented vacuum windows with integrated volumetric x-ray intensity, beam profile and beam-position monitoring capabilities. A 50 µm thick single crystal diamond has been lithographically patterned to produce 60 µm pixels, creating a >1kilopixel free-standing transmission imaging detector. This device, coupled with a custom, FPGA-based readout, has been used to image both white and monochromatic x-ray beams and capture the last x-ray photons at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This technology will form the basis for the instrumented end-station window of the x-ray footprinting beamline (XFP) at NSLS-II.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)
  2. Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States)
  3. Case Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608391
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; BEAM POSITION; BEAM PROFILES; BEAMS; CAPTURE; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DIAMONDS; EQUIPMENT; FEEDBACK; IMAGES; MONOCHROMATIC RADIATION; MONOCRYSTALS; NSLS; OPTICS; PHOTONS; READOUT SYSTEMS; STABILITY; SYNCHROTRONS; TRANSMISSION; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Smedley, John, E-mail: smedley@bnl.gov, Pinelli, Don, Gaoweia, Mengjia, Muller, Erik, Ding, Wenxiang, Zhou, Tianyi, and Bohon, Jen. Transmission diamond imaging detector. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952878.
Smedley, John, E-mail: smedley@bnl.gov, Pinelli, Don, Gaoweia, Mengjia, Muller, Erik, Ding, Wenxiang, Zhou, Tianyi, & Bohon, Jen. Transmission diamond imaging detector. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952878.
Smedley, John, E-mail: smedley@bnl.gov, Pinelli, Don, Gaoweia, Mengjia, Muller, Erik, Ding, Wenxiang, Zhou, Tianyi, and Bohon, Jen. Wed . "Transmission diamond imaging detector". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952878.
@article{osti_22608391,
title = {Transmission diamond imaging detector},
author = {Smedley, John, E-mail: smedley@bnl.gov and Pinelli, Don and Gaoweia, Mengjia and Muller, Erik and Ding, Wenxiang and Zhou, Tianyi and Bohon, Jen},
abstractNote = {Many modern synchrotron techniques are trending toward use of high flux beams and/or beams which require enhanced stability and precise understanding of beam position and intensity from the front end of the beamline all the way to the sample. For high flux beams, major challenges include heat load management in optics (including the vacuum windows) and a mechanism of real-time volumetric measurement of beam properties such as flux, position, and morphology. For beam stability in these environments, feedback from such measurements directly to control systems for optical elements or to sample positioning stages would be invaluable. To address these challenges, we are developing diamond-based instrumented vacuum windows with integrated volumetric x-ray intensity, beam profile and beam-position monitoring capabilities. A 50 µm thick single crystal diamond has been lithographically patterned to produce 60 µm pixels, creating a >1kilopixel free-standing transmission imaging detector. This device, coupled with a custom, FPGA-based readout, has been used to image both white and monochromatic x-ray beams and capture the last x-ray photons at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This technology will form the basis for the instrumented end-station window of the x-ray footprinting beamline (XFP) at NSLS-II.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952878},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Fabrication and testing of a prototype transmission-mode pixelated diamond X-ray detector (pitch size 60–100 µm), designed to simultaneously measure the flux, position and morphology of an X-ray beam in real time, are described. The pixel density is achieved by lithographically patterning vertical stripes on the front and horizontal stripes on the back of an electronic-grade chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond. The bias is rotated through the back horizontal stripes and the current is read out on the front vertical stripes at a rate of ~1 kHz, which leads to an image sampling rate of ~30 Hz. This novel signal readoutmore » scheme was tested at beamline X28C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (white beam, 5–15 keV) and at beamline G3 at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (monochromatic beam, 11.3 keV) with incident beam flux ranges from 1.8 × 10 -2to 90 W mm -2. Test results show that the novel detector provides precise beam position (positional noise within 1%) and morphology information (error within 2%), with an additional software-controlled single channel mode providing accurate flux measurement (fluctuation within 1%).« less
  • Fabrication and testing of a prototype transmission-mode pixelated diamond X-ray detector (pitch size 60–100 µm), designed to simultaneously measure the flux, position and morphology of an X-ray beam in real time, are described. The pixel density is achieved by lithographically patterning vertical stripes on the front and horizontal stripes on the back of an electronic-grade chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond. The bias is rotated through the back horizontal stripes and the current is read out on the front vertical stripes at a rate of ~1 kHz, which leads to an image sampling rate of ~30 Hz. This novel signal readoutmore » scheme was tested at beamline X28C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (white beam, 5–15 keV) and at beamline G3 at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (monochromatic beam, 11.3 keV) with incident beam flux ranges from 1.8 × 10 -2 to 90 W mm -2. Test results show that the novel detector provides precise beam position (positional noise within 1%) and morphology information (error within 2%), with an additional software-controlled single channel mode providing accurate flux measurement (fluctuation within 1%).« less
  • Several applications of external microbeam techniques demand a very accurate and controlled dose delivery. To satisfy these requirements when post-sample ion detection is not feasible, we constructed a transmission single-ion detector based on an ultra-thin diamond membrane. The negligible intrinsic noise provides an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and enables a hit-detection efficiency of close to 100%, even for energetic protons, while the small thickness of the membrane limits beam spreading. Moreover, because of the superb mechanical stiffness of diamond, this membrane can simultaneously serve as a vacuum window and allow the extraction of an ion microbeam into the atmosphere.
  • Precise monitoring of the incoming photon flux is crucial for many experiments using synchrotron radiation. For photon energies above a few keV, thin semiconductor photodiodes can be operated in transmission for this purpose. Diamond is a particularly attractive material as a result of its low absorption. The responsivity of a state-of-the art diamond quadrant transmission detector has been determined, with relative uncertainties below 1% by direct calibration against an electrical substitution radiometer. From these data and the measured transmittance, the thickness of the involved layers as well as the mean electron–hole pair creation energy were determined, the latter with anmore » unprecedented relative uncertainty of 1%. Lastly, the linearity and X-ray scattering properties of the device are also described.« less
  • Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) has been shown to be a powerful method for obtaining quantitative internal structural and chemical information from materials at the nanoscale. The installation of a Full-field TXM station will extend the current microtomographic capabilities of the Diamond-Manchester I13 Imaging Branchline at Diamond Light Source (UK) into the sub-100 nm spatial resolution range using photon energies from 8 to 14 keV. The dedicated Full-field TXM station will be built in-house with contributions of Diamond Light Source support divisions and via collaboration with the X-ray Optics Group of Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland) which will develop state-of-the-art diffractive X-raymore » optical elements. Preliminary results of the I13 Full-field TXM station are shown. The Full-field TXM will become an important Diamond Light Source direct imaging asset for material science, energy science and biology at the nanoscale.« less