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Title: DCS - A high flux beamline for time resolved dynamic compression science – Design highlights

Abstract

The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures. Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm{sup 2}. A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve amore » peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm{sup 2}. A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608372
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE; ANL; APERTURES; BEAM CURRENTS; BEAM OPTICS; BEAMS; COMPRESSION; FOCUSING; HEAT; HEAT FLUX; INTERLOCKS; MIRRORS; MONOCHROMATIC RADIATION; PHOTONS; PULSES; RADIATION PROTECTION; SECURITY; TIME RESOLUTION; WIGGLER MAGNETS

Citation Formats

Capatina, D., E-mail: capatina@aps.anl.gov, D’Amico, K., E-mail: kdamico@aps.anl.gov, Nudell, J., E-mail: jnudell@aps.anl.gov, Collins, J., E-mail: collins@aps.anl.gov, and Schmidt, O., E-mail: oschmidt@aps.anl.gov. DCS - A high flux beamline for time resolved dynamic compression science – Design highlights. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952859.
Capatina, D., E-mail: capatina@aps.anl.gov, D’Amico, K., E-mail: kdamico@aps.anl.gov, Nudell, J., E-mail: jnudell@aps.anl.gov, Collins, J., E-mail: collins@aps.anl.gov, & Schmidt, O., E-mail: oschmidt@aps.anl.gov. DCS - A high flux beamline for time resolved dynamic compression science – Design highlights. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952859.
Capatina, D., E-mail: capatina@aps.anl.gov, D’Amico, K., E-mail: kdamico@aps.anl.gov, Nudell, J., E-mail: jnudell@aps.anl.gov, Collins, J., E-mail: collins@aps.anl.gov, and Schmidt, O., E-mail: oschmidt@aps.anl.gov. 2016. "DCS - A high flux beamline for time resolved dynamic compression science – Design highlights". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952859.
@article{osti_22608372,
title = {DCS - A high flux beamline for time resolved dynamic compression science – Design highlights},
author = {Capatina, D., E-mail: capatina@aps.anl.gov and D’Amico, K., E-mail: kdamico@aps.anl.gov and Nudell, J., E-mail: jnudell@aps.anl.gov and Collins, J., E-mail: collins@aps.anl.gov and Schmidt, O., E-mail: oschmidt@aps.anl.gov},
abstractNote = {The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures. Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm{sup 2}. A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm{sup 2}. A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952859},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures.more » Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm 2. A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm 2. Finally, a new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.« less
  • The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures.more » Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm2. A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm2. A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.« less
  • We present subnanosecond-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments at the SPring-8 high flux beamline BL40XU by use of time structure of synchrotron radiation. A phase-locked mechanical chopper (x-ray pulse selector), which is made by Forschungszentrum Juelich, has minimum opening time of 400 nanoseconds and generates single-bunch x-ray pulse trains with variable intervals of 1-2 millisecond (0.5-1 kHz) depending on the rotation speed and with the x-ray pulse duration of {approx} 30 picoseconds from the hybrid bunch mode (D-mode) of the SPring-8 ring operation. The interval of pulse trains is further expanded to more than 1 second by another slower shutter, if necessary.more » The pulse train is applicable to time-resolved diffraction experiments with both monochromatic and pink beams. An observed Laue data set from lysozyme crystal showed sufficient quality to refine the protein structure at 1.9 A resolution. A 10-nanosecond pulse from a Nd:YAG laser initiating photoreaction in a crystal can be synchronized with the X-ray pulse. Installation of a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser/regenerative amplifier system which has a pulse duration of {approx} 2 picoseconds for further pump-probe experiments is also planed.« less
  • Originally conceived and developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) as an 'area' detector for rapid x-ray imaging studies, the fast readout low noise (FReLoN) detector of the ESRF [J.-C. Labiche, ESRF Newsletter 25, 41 (1996)] has been demonstrated to be a highly versatile and unique detector. Charge coupled device (CCD) cameras at present available on the public market offer either a high dynamic range or a high readout speed. A compromise between signal dynamic range and readout speed is always sought. The parameters of the commercial cameras can sometimes be tuned, in order to better fulfill the needsmore » of specific experiments, but in general these cameras have a poor duty cycle (i.e., the signal integration time is much smaller than the readout time). In order to address scientific problems such as time resolved experiments at the ESRF, a FReLoN camera has been developed by the Instrument Support Group at ESRF. This camera is a low noise CCD camera that combines high dynamic range, high readout speed, accuracy, and improved duty cycle in a single image. In this paper, we show its application in a quasi-one-dimensional sense to dynamic problems in materials science, catalysis, and chemistry that require data acquisition on a time scale of milliseconds or a few tens of milliseconds. It is demonstrated that in this mode the FReLoN can be applied equally to the investigation of rapid changes in long range order (via diffraction) and local order (via energy dispersive extended x-ray absorption fine structure) and in situations of x-ray hardness and flux beyond the capacity of other detectors.« less
  • A vacuum-ultraviolet bending-magnet beamline for circular dichroism (CD) experiments has been designed. To maximize the photon flux and minimize the focused beam size, a cylindrical mirror and a cylindrical grating with independent optical functions are utilized. The beamline can collect a 30 mrad horizontal by 7 mrad vertical solid angle of synchrotron radiation. By using a 600 grooves/mm grating, the calculated photon flux is greater than 1x10{sup 13} photons/sec and the focused beam size is 0.4 mmx0.65 mm for the spectral range from 130 nm to 330 nm with the energy resolving power set at 1000. The linear polarization degreemore » is better than 75% and can be increased to 90% by reducing the vertical acceptance angle down to 2 mrad. In addition to the high flux mode described above, this beamline can also be operated in a high resolution mode. By using a 1200 grooves/mm grating, a resolving power greater than 10,000 can be achieved for the spectral range from 180 to 330 nm. This beamline can provide photon flux as high as the best synchrotron CD beamlines in the world while offers simultaneously a smaller focused beam size.« less